James Raia

Saturn Aura, 2007: The Weekly Driver Car Review

Saturn Aura, 2007: The Weekly Driver Car Review 1With 16 manufacturers offering midsize cars and another 10 manufacturers in the premium midsize market, newcomers in the exceedingly popular category often face rough sales roads. Saturn didn’t fare well with its midsize L-Series, which was discontinued in 2004. But the General Motors division is trying again with the 2007 Aura.

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Mercury Mountaineer, 2006: The Weekly Driver Car Review

mountaineerIn the 15-year span beginning in 1990, sales of sport utility vehicles grew at at alarming rate. In 1990, about 900,000 SUVs were purchased. By the end of 2004, about 28 percent of all new vehicle sales, or about 4.75 million units, were SUVs.

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Volvo C70 T5, 2006: The Weekly Driver Car Review

Volvo C70 T5, 2006: The Weekly Driver Car Review 5Hardtop convertibles have been around periodically in the United States for about 50 years. And from the early years of Ford Fairliner to the current offerings of several manufacturers, the same question always arises: How mechanically sound is the retracting hardtop mechanism?

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Suzuki Aerio, 2006: The Weekly Driver Car Review

Suzuki Aerio, 2006: The Weekly Driver Car Review 6In January, 2004, the automotive industry arrived at another unique plateau. For the first time, the average price of a new car in the United States surpassed $30,000. Ironically, it was also only a few years ago, the same amount designated the minimum amount of a luxury car.

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Volkswagen Passat, 2006: The Weekly Driver Car Review

Volkswagen Passat, 2006: The Weekly Driver Car Review 7Golf courses to restaurants, the quaintness of the small towns to the Pacific Ocean, there’s nothing quite like a visit to the Monterey Peninsula. But the 200-mile drive from Sacramento is also an ideal route for testing cars, particularly the 2006 Volkswagen Passat.

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Suzuki Reno, 2006: The Weekly Driver Car Review

Suzuki Reno, 2006: The Weekly Driver Car Review 10According to the National Automobile Dealers’ Association, the average price of a new car in the United States in 2006 is $28,600. That’s $1,400 less than what not too long was considered beginning price point for a luxury vehicle.

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