2014 Toyota Tundra: Spacious new workhorse

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Redesigned for the first time in seven years, the 2014 Toyota Tundra features an integrated hood, tightened surfaces and new overall lines to further enhance the full-size pick-up’s pulling power and wide stance.

The 2014 Tundra will be offered in a new five-grade strategy: the hard-working SR, volume-leading SR5, the well-appointed Limited, and two premium grades: Platinum and “1794 Edition.” Three cab styles, two-door Regular Cab, four-door Double Cab and four-door CrewMax, all available in 4×2 and 4×4. Each grade is well-equipped with key standard features.

Showcased at a recent regional media gathering at Cle Elum, Wa., the 2014 Toyota Tundra lineup will range from $25,920 for the SR grade 4×2 Regular Cab, 4.0-liter V6 to $47,320 for the Platinum and 1794 Edition CrewMax 4×4 grades equipped with a 5.7-liter V8.

The newly redesigned 2014 Toyota Tundra
The newly redesigned 2014 Toyota Tundra. Images © James Raia/2013

Based on comparisons between the new grade strategy for 2014  models and 2013 models with comparable equipment levels, the MSRP’s reflect an overall average decrease of $263, or 0.7 percent.

The Weekly Driver drove the CrewMax 4×4 Limited for a 30-minute test through several small Northwest cities and compiled a brief, quick list of observations:

Likes:

Superior interior space, particularly the rear seat where’s plenty of room for three adults.

Big truck, small turning radius.

Big truck, drives smaller (it’s a compliment).

Smooth, carlike ride.

Dislikes:

Small navigation screen for a large truck.

The Entune technology system includes the app for Yelp, the small business review. Yelp? It just seems like a bad idea.

The Tundra has a huge amount of power, but it’s not that aggressively quick.

The 2014 Tundra is the only full-size pickup with available Blind Spot Monitor with RearCross Traffic Alert (available on Limited CrewMax, Platinum and 1794 Edition only). All Tundra models feature the standard Toyota Star Safety System™ that includes
Vehicle Stability Control (VSC), Traction Control (TRAC), an Anti-lock Braking System (ABS), Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD), Brake Assist (BA), and Smart Stop (SST) brake override technology.

The front lower bumpers are now a three-piece design, allowing for lower replacement costs.  In addition, the fenders and wheel wells have been squared-off for a wide and sturdy stance. A new exterior design helps carry the chiseled character lines all the way down the profile, leading to a rugged new bed and tail gate, with an integrated spoiler and “TUNDRA” embossed into the sheet metal, creating a one-piece forged look. Like the front bumper, the rear bumper changes from one piece to three, for lower replacement costs.

A 4.0-liter Dual Overhead Cam (DOHC) V6 is standard on Tundra Regular and Double Cab SR models and produces 270 horsepower at 5,600 rpm and 278 foot-pounds of peak torque at 4,400 rpm.  It is paired with a five-speed automatic transmission with uphill/downhill shift logic. The 4.6-liter, DOHC i-Force V8 offers 310 horsepower at 5,600 rpm and 327 foot-pounds of peak torque at 3,400rpm.

Source: Toyota Motor Corporation.

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