THE WEEKLY DRIVER https://theweeklydriver.com/blog/ THE WEEKLY DRIVER PODCAST IS AN EXTENSION OF THEWEEKLYDRIVER.COM, ONLINE SINCE 2004 Tue, 24 Mar 2020 06:22:34 +0000 en hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 THE WEEKLY DRIVER PODCAST IS AN EXTENSION OF THEWEEKLYDRIVER.COM, ONLINE SINCE 2004 James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean episodic James Raia and Bruce Aldrich james@jamesraia.com james@jamesraia.com (James Raia and Bruce Aldrich) © Copyright 2019 The Weekly Driver. All rights reserved. THE WEEKLY DRIVER PODCAST IS AN EXTENSION OF THEWEEKLYDRIVER.COM, ONLINE SINCE 2004 THE WEEKLY DRIVER https://www.theweeklydriver.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/ddriver1400.jpg https://theweeklydriver.com/blog/ TV-G #126 podcast: Couple embraces home tech business https://theweeklydriver.com/2020/03/126-podcast-couple-embraces-home-tech-business/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=126-podcast-couple-embraces-home-tech-business Tue, 17 Mar 2020 00:42:42 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32372 Valerie Antkowiak and Mark Pallone are retired Intel engineers, but they're still involved in their careers via a home-based business about home technology. The husband-wife team, who lives in El Dorado Hills, California, publishes the website AppMyHome.com. The site and their home is the testing ground for all things in the extended home technology field. Valerie Antkowiak of appmyhome.com discussing the technology in her new 2020 Hyundai Santa Fe. Antkowiak is our guest on episode No. 126 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss talk with Antowiak about the couple's history with the site and their process for testing home technology equipment. The couple's home technology extends to the automobile industry, and we discuss that, too. We talk about navigation systems to the future of autonomous driving. Antkowiak and Pallone recently purchased a Hyundai Santa Fe, and they're impressed with varied and efficient technology functions the South Korean SUV features. Antkowiak narrates and Pallone produces a piece on the extensive features available on the Hyundai. It's among the many videos the couple has featured on their YouTube channel. Here's how Antkowiak and Pallone define their business: “Exploring technology and products available for the Smart Home, the Kitchen and Travel. We test and review products in our own home or occasionally, at our friends’ and relatives’ homes, and share our experience with stories and videos.” For more tech reviews, visit: www.appmyhome.com. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Valerie Antkowiak and Mark Pallone are retired Intel engineers, but they're still involved in their careers via a home-based business about home technology. - The husband-wife team, who lives in El Dorado Hills, California,
The husband-wife team, who lives in El Dorado Hills, California, publishes the website AppMyHome.com. The site and their home is the testing ground for all things in the extended home technology field.

Valerie Antkowiak of appmyhome.com discussing the technology in her new 2020 Hyundai Santa Fe.

Antkowiak is our guest on episode No. 126 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss talk with Antowiak about the couple's history with the site and their process for testing home technology equipment.

The couple's home technology extends to the automobile industry, and we discuss that, too. We talk about navigation systems to the future of autonomous driving.

Antkowiak and Pallone recently purchased a Hyundai Santa Fe, and they're impressed with varied and efficient technology functions the South Korean SUV features.

Antkowiak narrates and Pallone produces a piece on the extensive features available on the Hyundai. It's among the many videos the couple has featured on their YouTube channel.

Here's how Antkowiak and Pallone define their business:

“Exploring technology and products available for the Smart Home, the Kitchen and Travel. We test and review products in our own home or occasionally, at our friends’ and relatives’ homes, and share our experience with stories and videos.”

For more tech reviews, visit: www.appmyhome.com.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich 1 41:52
#125 podcast, Drive Toward A Parkinson’s Disease Cure https://theweeklydriver.com/2020/03/125-podcast-drive-toward-a-parkinsons-disease-cure/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=125-podcast-drive-toward-a-parkinsons-disease-cure Tue, 10 Mar 2020 01:20:08 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32333 Deb Pollack has been involved in the automotive industry for decades. She's worked for small and large companies and several manufacturers, Ferrari to Maserati and General Motors to Mitsubishi Pollack's work in public relations, which the Los Angeles-based businesswoman describes as the "blending of cars and camaraderie," has also resulted in her national philanthropic efforts with the organization she founded, Drive Toward A Cure (www.drivetowardacure.org). Deb Pollack (driving) is the founder of the non-profit Drive Toward A Cure. It raises money to benefit the fight against Parkinson's Disease. Image courtesy of Deb Pollack. In addition to currently working as the publicist for the boutique restoration house Singer Vehicle Design, Pollack advocates the ability to team cars and camaraderie to raise funds to benefit the battle against Parkinson's Disease. Pollack is our guest on Episode #125 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with the organization's founder how her idea — fundraising automotive-travel events around the country — has grown, and what's planned this year. "Having been in the car industry for several decades — blending cars and camaraderie has always been something of second nature," said Pollack, based in Los Angeles. "But when I lost my mom to Parkinson’s in 2006, I realized there were meaningful ways to share friendships and the emotional bonds and gratification that driving can bring to support the challenges others may face." The first of a diverse series of Drive Toward A Cure events this season is the organization's inaugural 'weekend getaway.' Specifically, it's The Kentucky Bourbon Trail Getaway. As Pollack describes the weekend: "It's a full day of unlimited Touring Lapping at the NCM Motorsports Park before heading to Louisville. After we’ve checked into the historic Brown Hotel, we’ll hit a local 'speakeasy' for great food and libations, and a chance to unwind. "Saturday will feature a relaxing day touring several hand-picked Kentucky Bourbon distilleries and three great meals. Finally, on Sunday we apply the tried-and-true Drive Toward a Cure formula of great back road driving, crossing state lines into Tennessee and changing time zones with great visits to the Bavarian Bierhaus in Nashville and the Lane Motor Museum!" In addition to other rally-travel days, Drive Toward A Cure also recently expanded its fundraising efforts to support for those challenged by Parkinson’s Disease by establishing an all-new "Special Assistance Fund." It will provide financial assistance to qualified applicants following extenuating circumstances, such as the recent devastating tornado in Nashville, Tennessee. Since its inception, Drive Toward A Cure has raised more than $300,000, including contributions that provide financial assistance for research and patient programs. For program details and this season's schedule of events, visit: www.drivetowardacure.org The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Deb Pollack has been involved in the automotive industry for decades. She's worked for small and large companies and several manufacturers, Ferrari to Maserati and General Motors to Mitsubishi - Pollack's work in public relations,
Pollack's work in public relations, which the Los Angeles-based businesswoman describes as the "blending of cars and camaraderie," has also resulted in her national philanthropic efforts with the organization she founded, Drive Toward A Cure (www.drivetowardacure.org).

Deb Pollack (driving) is the founder of the non-profit Drive Toward A Cure. It raises money to benefit the fight against Parkinson's Disease. Image courtesy of Deb Pollack.

In addition to currently working as the publicist for the boutique restoration house Singer Vehicle Design, Pollack advocates the ability to team cars and camaraderie to raise funds to benefit the battle against Parkinson's Disease.

Pollack is our guest on Episode #125 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with the organization's founder how her idea — fundraising automotive-travel events around the country — has grown, and what's planned this year.

"Having been in the car industry for several decades — blending cars and camaraderie has always been something of second nature," said Pollack, based in Los Angeles. "But when I lost my mom to Parkinson’s in 2006, I realized there were meaningful ways to share friendships and the emotional bonds and gratification that driving can bring to support the challenges others may face."

The first of a diverse series of Drive Toward A Cure events this season is the organization's inaugural 'weekend getaway.'

Specifically, it's The Kentucky Bourbon Trail Getaway.

As Pollack describes the weekend:

"It's a full day of unlimited Touring Lapping at the NCM Motorsports Park before heading to Louisville. After we’ve checked into the historic Brown Hotel, we’ll hit a local 'speakeasy' for great food and libations, and a chance to unwind.

"Saturday will feature a relaxing day touring several hand-picked Kentucky Bourbon distilleries and three great meals. Finally, on Sunday we apply the tried-and-true Drive Toward a Cure formula of great back road driving, crossing state lines into Tennessee and changing time zones with great visits to the Bavarian Bierhaus in Nashville and the Lane Motor Museum!"

In addition to other rally-travel days, Drive Toward A Cure also recently expanded its fundraising efforts to support for those challenged by Parkinson’s Disease by establishing an all-new "Special Assistance Fund." It will provide financial assistance to qualified applicants following extenuating circumstances, such as the recent devastating tornado in Nashville, Tennessee.

Since its inception, Drive Toward A Cure has raised more than $300,000, including contributions that provide financial assistance for research and patient programs.

For program details and this season's schedule of events, visit: www.drivetowardacure.org

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast
]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich 1 23:34
#124, Cartoonist is auto world’s wacky, witty futurist https://theweeklydriver.com/2020/03/124-cartoonist-is-auto-worlds-wacky-witty-futurist/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=124-cartoonist-is-auto-worlds-wacky-witty-futurist Tue, 03 Mar 2020 19:49:16 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32311 Steven M. Johnson is a cartoonist with a fondness for the absurd. With astute detail, humor and poignancy, he's a purveyor of wacky, futuristic product ideas. It's all silly, except for when it's not. Johnson, an editorial cartoonist and illustrator for nearly 60 years, is our guest on this week's episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. The 81-year-old author of 10 books lives and works in Carmichael, California. The Honest Commute (above) is among Steven M. Johnson's Patent Depending panels about the auto industry. Below, left to right, a cover of one of Johnson's books and two additional examples of Patent Depending series. All images courtesy of Steven M. Johnson. A former city planner who attended Yale but transferred and graduated from UC Berkeley with a degree in Journalistic Studies, Johnson was a long-time general assignment cartoonist for the Sacramento Bee. He also had a weekly panel at the newspaper with future ideas called A Step Ahead. Feature reporters were fortunate when Johnson was assigned to illustrate their stories. We didn't work together often, but more than 35 years ago, I wrote an article about taking "gambler's buses" for the newspaper'a long-ago defunct section called Out & About. It was a glimpse into the popular transportation method of many pensioners who enjoyed making the trip from Sacramento to Lake Tahoe. Johnson's illustration showed the bus, newly equipped with arms and legs, sitting a poker table playing card with other patrons. It one of my brief moments into the cartoonist's world. On another occasion, during the major long-distance running frenzy in the 1980s, Johnson illustrated an article I wrote for the same outdoors section on newfangled running gear. The cartoon showed a runner burdened with all kinds of contraptions, some of which were included in the article. Johnson added other ideas for embellishment, hilarious doses of worthy, light-hearted sarcasm about some of the ludicrous products. The former high school and collegiate runner had already accomplished much before his 17-year career at the newspaper. And much has happened since. Johnson's favorite topics include the automobile and transportation industries. It was how his admirable career began at age 36 while he was employed as the editorial cartoonist for formerly titled Sierra Club Bulletin. "The first assignment that triggered the 'inner inventor' in me was in 1974 when I was asked to envision future RVs," Johnson recalls. "The editor wanted 16 cartoons and I created 109. I could not stop!" Follow his tenure working for the Bee, Johnson was hired as a "futurist" for the research and development division of Honda. It's part of Johnson's collection of employment titles, some self-determined like whimsicalist and possibilitist. Some of Johnson's bizarre ideas have proven prophetic. In 1975, Johnson fashioned the idea of pre-torn clothing. He described a product similar to Google Glasses in 1992. Several ideas in his theme of Public Therapy Buses have been made. His auto panels include Road Office, Honest Commute and Tunnel Bus. Thousands of his ideas abound in cartoons. Nearly a decade ago, Johnson began his involvement with the Maker Faire, the global yearly gathering of inventors and artists. He had a booth in Xian China in 2017 and in Shenzhen two years ago. Johnson's involvement resulted in a contract with a publisher in China. His current two-book project is scheduled for publication this year in the world's largest automotive market. Please join co-host Bruce Aldrich and me for our interview with Johnson. We discuss the artist's long-time fascination with automobiles and other transportation matters, all wonderfully absurd. The full spectrum of Johnson's work is available on www.patentdepending.com. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. Steven M. Johnson is a cartoonist with a fondness for the absurd. With astute detail, humor and poignancy, he's a purveyor of wacky, futuristic product ideas. It's all silly, except for when it's not. - Johnson,
Johnson, an editorial cartoonist and illustrator for nearly 60 years, is our guest on this week's episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. The 81-year-old author of 10 books lives and works in Carmichael, California.

The Honest Commute (above) is among Steven M. Johnson's Patent Depending panels about the auto industry. Below, left to right, a cover of one of Johnson's books and two additional examples of Patent Depending series. All images courtesy of Steven M. Johnson.







A former city planner who attended Yale but transferred and graduated from UC Berkeley with a degree in Journalistic Studies, Johnson was a long-time general assignment cartoonist for the Sacramento Bee. He also had a weekly panel at the newspaper with future ideas called A Step Ahead.

Feature reporters were fortunate when Johnson was assigned to illustrate their stories. We didn't work together often, but more than 35 years ago, I wrote an article about taking "gambler's buses" for the newspaper'a long-ago defunct section called Out & About. It was a glimpse into the popular transportation method of many pensioners who enjoyed making the trip from Sacramento to Lake Tahoe.

Johnson's illustration showed the bus, newly equipped with arms and legs, sitting a poker table playing card with other patrons. It one of my brief moments into the cartoonist's world.

On another occasion, during the major long-distance running frenzy in the 1980s, Johnson illustrated an article I wrote for the same outdoors section on newfangled running gear.

The cartoon showed a runner burdened with all kinds of contraptions, some of which were included in the article. Johnson added other ideas for embellishment, hilarious doses of worthy, light-hearted sarcasm about some of the ludicrous products.

The former high school and collegiate runner had already accomplished much before his 17-year career at the newspaper. And much has happened since.

Johnson's favorite topics include the automobile and transportation industries. It was how his admirable career began at age 36 while he was employed as the editorial cartoonist for formerly titled Sierra Club Bulletin.

"The first assignment that triggered the 'inner inventor' in me was in 1974 when I was asked to envision future RVs," Johnson recalls. "The editor wanted 16 cartoons and I created 109. I could not stop!"

Follow his tenure working for the Bee, Johnson was hired as a "futurist" for the research and development division of Honda. It's part of Johnson's collection of employment titles, some self-determined like whimsicalist and possibilitist.

Some of Johnson's bizarre ideas have proven prophetic. In 1975, Johnson fashioned the idea of pre-torn clothing. He described a product similar to Google Glasses in 1992. Several ideas in his theme of Public Therapy Buses have been made. His auto panels include Road Office, Honest Commute and Tunnel Bus. Thousands of his ideas abound in cartoons.

Nearly a decade ago, Johnson began his involvement with the Maker Faire, the global yearly gathering of inventors and artists. He had a booth in Xian China in 2017 and in Shenzhen two years ago.
]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich 1 34:54
#123, Danny Shapiro discusses 2020 Nvidia GTC Technology Show https://theweeklydriver.com/2020/02/123-danny-shapiro-discusses-2020-nvidia-gtc-technology-show/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=123-danny-shapiro-discusses-2020-nvidia-gtc-technology-show Tue, 25 Feb 2020 01:30:37 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32282 Danny Shapiro, Senior Director of Automotive at Nvidia Corporation in Santa Clara, California, is as knowledgeable as anyone in the autonomous automotive industry. The technology company is at the forefront of delivering solutions to automakers for self-driving cars, infotainment, digital instrument clusters, rear-seat entertainment and advanced driver assistance systems. Nvidia's GTC Technology Conference, scheduled March 22-26 in San Jose, California, is the premier AI and deep learning event, providing you with training, insights, and direct access to experts from NVIDIA and other leading organizations. Danny Shapiro discusses Nvidia and the 2020 GTC Technology Conference in this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Shapiro is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-host Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss all things related to the future of autonomous vehicles with the 25-year veteran of the computer graphics and semiconductor industries. Shapiro has degrees in electrical engineering, computer science and business administration from Princeton and UC Berkeley. And he's keen on the solutions that will enable faster and better design of automobiles, as well as in-vehicle solutions for infotainment, navigation and driver assistance. Since 2014, Nvidia has diversified its business focusing on four markets: gaming, professional visualization, data centers and auto. Nvidia is also now focused on artificial intelligence. In addition to manufacturing, Nvidia provides parallel processing capabilities to researchers and scientists that allow them to efficiently run high-performance applications. They are deployed in supercomputing sites around the world. Where is the future of autonomous driving? We discuss that. How safe is it? We cover that, too, as well as the fierce competition in the marketplace of the Silicon Valley in California and China. Join us for an informative episode from an expert in the future of autonomous vehicles. For additional information, visit: GTC Technology Conference The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Danny Shapiro, Senior Director of Automotive at Nvidia Corporation in Santa Clara, California, is as knowledgeable as anyone in the autonomous automotive industry. The technology company is at the forefront of delivering solutions to automakers for sel...
Nvidia's GTC Technology Conference, scheduled March 22-26 in San Jose, California, is the premier AI and deep learning event, providing you with training, insights, and direct access to experts from NVIDIA and other leading organizations.

Danny Shapiro discusses Nvidia and the 2020 GTC Technology Conference in this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Shapiro is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-host Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss all things related to the future of autonomous vehicles with the 25-year veteran of the computer graphics and semiconductor industries.

Shapiro has degrees in electrical engineering, computer science and business administration from Princeton and UC Berkeley. And he's keen on the solutions that will enable faster and better design of automobiles, as well as in-vehicle solutions for infotainment, navigation and driver assistance.

Since 2014, Nvidia has diversified its business focusing on four markets: gaming, professional visualization, data centers and auto. Nvidia is also now focused on artificial intelligence.

In addition to manufacturing, Nvidia provides parallel processing capabilities to researchers and scientists that allow them to efficiently run high-performance applications. They are deployed in supercomputing sites around the world.

Where is the future of autonomous driving? We discuss that. How safe is it? We cover that, too, as well as the fierce competition in the marketplace of the Silicon Valley in California and China.

Join us for an informative episode from an expert in the future of autonomous vehicles.

For additional information, visit: GTC Technology Conference

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich 1 23:11
#122, Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich, James Raia talk car stuff https://theweeklydriver.com/2020/02/122-co-hosts-bruce-aldrich-james-raia-talk-car-stuff/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=122-co-hosts-bruce-aldrich-james-raia-talk-car-stuff Wed, 19 Feb 2020 06:28:09 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32241 The Weekly Driver Podcast usually has at least one guest each week, sometimes more. But sometimes co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia just talk it out. We did exactly that in episode #122. There's always a lot going on in the automotive industry— recalls to Tesla's latest fiascos, the further saga of the autonomous driving industry to new car and truck models. Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview automotive experts every week on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Bruce and I agree on many areas of the automotive industry, but not everything. Listen to the new episode of our 30-minute podcast as we cover a lot of areas, the above-mentioned topics to a few random opinions about cars old and new. It's also a good time to reiterate our appreciation for the guests we interviewed from many areas of the automotive world. We've talked with famous people, renowned mountain climber and van enthusiast Alex Honnold to Larry Dominique, President of Peugeot North America. We've chatted with spokespeople from trade shows, auctions and various entrepreneurs. We interviewed vintage car collectors, artists and memorabilia experts. We're having a blast. The Weekly Driver Podcast also needs our listeners' assistance. The more listeners, the better our chances of secure funding to expand what we do best — staying abreast of the automotive industry. Spread the word about our podcast via your social media accounts. The archives of our 2 1/2 years of podcasting, all my automotive reviews dating to 2005 as well a sign-up for my just-debuting electronic weekly newsletter are all available on my website, theweeklydriver.com. If you'd like to support theweekldydriver.com financially via advertising or sponsorship, please contact me via email: james@jamesraia.com. The Weekly Driver Podcast also encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Also support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   The Weekly Driver Podcast usually has at least one guest each week, sometimes more. But sometimes co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia just talk it out. - We did exactly that in episode #122. There's always a lot going on in the automotive industry— ...
We did exactly that in episode #122. There's always a lot going on in the automotive industry— recalls to Tesla's latest fiascos, the further saga of the autonomous driving industry to new car and truck models.

Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview automotive experts every week on The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Bruce and I agree on many areas of the automotive industry, but not everything.

Listen to the new episode of our 30-minute podcast as we cover a lot of areas, the above-mentioned topics to a few random opinions about cars old and new.

It's also a good time to reiterate our appreciation for the guests we interviewed from many areas of the automotive world. We've talked with famous people, renowned mountain climber and van enthusiast Alex Honnold to Larry Dominique, President of Peugeot North America.

We've chatted with spokespeople from trade shows, auctions and various entrepreneurs. We interviewed vintage car collectors, artists and memorabilia experts. We're having a blast.

The Weekly Driver Podcast also needs our listeners' assistance. The more listeners, the better our chances of secure funding to expand what we do best — staying abreast of the automotive industry. Spread the word about our podcast via your social media accounts.

The archives of our 2 1/2 years of podcasting, all my automotive reviews dating to 2005 as well a sign-up for my just-debuting electronic weekly newsletter are all available on my website, theweeklydriver.com.

If you'd like to support theweekldydriver.com financially via advertising or sponsorship, please contact me via email: james@jamesraia.com.

The Weekly Driver Podcast also encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Also support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich 1 38:59
#121, Best used cars, best enduring cars from iseecars.com https://theweeklydriver.com/2020/02/121-best-used-cars-best-enduring-cars-from-iseecars-com/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=121-best-used-cars-best-enduring-cars-from-iseecars-com Fri, 07 Feb 2020 20:56:46 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32238 Julie Blackley, communications manager for the car search engine iSeeCars.com, is a frequent guest on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Blackley writes and distributes monthly studies that analyze automotive data, on topics ranging best used cars to popular car colors to states with the most pick-ups. The wide-ranging categories, according to the website, are aggregations of a massive amount of information tabulated from "proprietary algorithms to objectively analyze, score and rank millions of cars and tens of thousands of dealers, providing helpful insights and guidance to users to find a good car at a good price from a trustworthy seller." Best used cars, best new cars, best enduring cars from iseecars.com. For automotive statistics junkies, the site is a tremendous fix. Blackley was our recent guest in her fourth appearance on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discussed with her the results of data from three recent studies: 1. Top 15 Vehicles Owners Keep for 15 Years or Longer; 2. The Most Popular Cars By State (the 10 largest states) ; 3. The Best Used Cars For 2020. Due to technical issues, our interview with Blackley is not available. Instead, Bruce and James revisit the three areas of the most recent iSeeCars.com surveys and recap the knowledge and insight Blackley provided. In separate posts, I have also published each of the surveys and well as a new analysis of the most popular car colors. Links to the posts our archived podcast episodes with Blackley are also provided below. The iSeeCars.com site is a comprehensive platform for all car buyers, and The Weekly Driver Podcast recommends visiting the site for practical information to help determine your next purchase. As Blackley says, "I write and disseminate monthly studies that analyze iSeeCars data on topics that help consumers navigate the difficult car-buying process." The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Julie Blackley, communications manager for the car search engine iSeeCars.com, is a frequent guest on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Blackley writes and distributes monthly studies that analyze automotive data, iSeeCars.com, is a frequent guest on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Blackley writes and distributes monthly studies that analyze automotive data, on topics ranging best used cars to popular car colors to states with the most pick-ups.

The wide-ranging categories, according to the website, are aggregations of a massive amount of information tabulated from "proprietary algorithms to objectively analyze, score and rank millions of cars and tens of thousands of dealers, providing helpful insights and guidance to users to find a good car at a good price from a trustworthy seller."

Best used cars, best new cars, best enduring cars from iseecars.com.

For automotive statistics junkies, the site is a tremendous fix.

Blackley was our recent guest in her fourth appearance on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discussed with her the results of data from three recent studies:

1. Top 15 Vehicles Owners Keep for 15 Years or Longer; 2. The Most Popular Cars By State (the 10 largest states) ; 3. The Best Used Cars For 2020.

Due to technical issues, our interview with Blackley is not available.

Instead, Bruce and James revisit the three areas of the most recent iSeeCars.com surveys and recap the knowledge and insight Blackley provided. In separate posts, I have also published each of the surveys and well as a new analysis of the most popular car colors.

Links to the posts our archived podcast episodes with Blackley are also provided below.

The iSeeCars.com site is a comprehensive platform for all car buyers, and The Weekly Driver Podcast recommends visiting the site for practical information to help determine your next purchase.

As Blackley says, "I write and disseminate monthly studies that analyze iSeeCars data on topics that help consumers navigate the difficult car-buying process."

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 23:37
#120, Author Patrick Foster celebrates 80 years of Jeep https://theweeklydriver.com/2020/01/120-author-patrick-foster-celebrates-80-years-of-jeep/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=120-author-patrick-foster-celebrates-80-years-of-jeep Wed, 22 Jan 2020 06:52:52 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32196 Author Patrick Foster knows as much as anyone about automaker Jeep. With more than 30 years in the automotive industry, Foster is a prolific journalist, particularly when writing about the long history of the utilitarian, four-wheel-drive vehicles. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview Foster in episode #120 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. The eight-decade of Jeep is detailed in Patrick Foster's new book. Foster's latest book is JEEP: EIGHT DECADES FROM WILLYS TO WRANGLER (Motorbooks $32.99.) Accompanied by more than 200 photographs, the 192-page paperback is described as "the definitive book on the greatest four-wheel-drive vehicle ever." During our 30-minute interview, Foster details his passion for Jeep and gives an insightful account of the stories behind the design and production of the vehicle. The automaker's well-known World War II presence to current models are all covered. Military-issued Jeeps, as well as the first post-war JC and now-classic SUVs, are all included in Foster's impressive chronicling of the enduring machines. The new volume updates Foster's previous Jeep books. It includes five years of new model editions and prototypes, Jeep's return to the pickup market, and recent marketplace successes. The book's color and black-and-white photographs are complemented by unique Jeep advertisement material from throughout its tenure. Foster's latest book, as well as his collection of previous works, are available on his website www.oldemilfordpress.com. New buyers receive signed copies. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio The Weekly Driver, published since 2004, has also reviewed many Jeeps. Visit: JEEP REVIEWS Author Patrick Foster knows as much as anyone about automaker Jeep. With more than 30 years in the automotive industry, Foster is a prolific journalist, particularly when writing about the long history of the utilitarian, four-wheel-drive vehicles.
Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview Foster in episode #120 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

The eight-decade of Jeep is detailed in Patrick Foster's new book.

Foster's latest book is JEEP: EIGHT DECADES FROM WILLYS TO WRANGLER (Motorbooks $32.99.)

Accompanied by more than 200 photographs, the 192-page paperback is described as "the definitive book on the greatest four-wheel-drive vehicle ever."

During our 30-minute interview, Foster details his passion for Jeep and gives an insightful account of the stories behind the design and production of the vehicle. The automaker's well-known World War II presence to current models are all covered.

Military-issued Jeeps, as well as the first post-war JC and now-classic SUVs, are all included in Foster's impressive chronicling of the enduring machines.

The new volume updates Foster's previous Jeep books. It includes five years of new model editions and prototypes, Jeep's return to the pickup market, and recent marketplace successes.

The book's color and black-and-white photographs are complemented by unique Jeep advertisement material from throughout its tenure.

Foster's latest book, as well as his collection of previous works, are available on his website www.oldemilfordpress.com. New buyers receive signed copies.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

The Weekly Driver, published since 2004, has also reviewed many Jeeps. Visit: JEEP REVIEWS]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 31:38
#119, Pro cycling teams rely on team cars’ assistance https://theweeklydriver.com/2020/01/119-pro-cycling-teams-rely-on-team-cars-assistance/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=119-pro-cycling-teams-rely-on-team-cars-assistance Tue, 14 Jan 2020 19:42:50 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32178 Professional road cyclists were once self-sustaining athletes. Vehicle support wasn't allowed in races like the Tour de France unless via unscrupulous means. Catching a rider getting assistance from a car meant disqualification. Much has changed. With various other company relationships for bicycles, helmets, sunglasses and energy food, vehicle sponsorship is as much part of a team as its riders. The Rally Cycling Team supports its men's and women's team with 2019 Acura RDX sport utility vehicles. Images courtesy of Sam Wiebe/Rally Cycling Team. Race organizers rely on manufacturer vehicles to keep the race intact and safe as it progresses along country roads and into mountain ranges. Andrew Bajadali, a former pro cycling and director with the Rally Cycling Team, is our guest this week on Episode #119 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. We discuss how pro cycling teams rely on team vehicles to assist their riders. Co-host James Raia talks with Bajadali from the passenger seat of a 2019 Acura RDX during the opening day of the team's training camp in Oxnard, California. Bruce Aldrich, the broadcast's other co-host, produced the episode from Sacramento. During more than a four-hour team ride along the Pacific Coast Highways and into the surrounding foothills, Bajadali and I discuss the learning curve of the transition of a pro career into a director's role. It includes learning from other directors the ins-and-outs driving during races that may 150 cyclists and several-dozen team cars “A team car is really there to support in all ways,” said Bajadali. “I don’t know if people who don’t know the ins-and-outs of the sport know how important it is to have a car there. It’s a major luxury.” Unlike cycling teams of yesteryear that relied on panel vans or mini cars with questionable reliability, most current teams opt for all-wheel drive wagons or SUVs. One now-defunct team in recent years had two Porsche Panamera sports cars as support vehicles. It didn’t go well. During training and races, team vehicles transport extra bikes, wheels, various equipment, food, water and medical equipment. If a race includes 20 teams, 40 team vehicles, plus official race vehicles, all advance along the route in an ever-changing processional that also may include 150 riders. Every team’s vehicles are detailed in team colors and have signage for its sponsors. A road race may advance smoothly for hours on a long, open road. But chaos can occur in an instant after a crash. Team cars require skilled drivers, usually former pro cyclists, who negotiate winding roads often at high speeds to assist riders. “Basically, you’re just always learning,” said Bajadali who first drove a team car in the early season Dubai Tour. “It was amazing just to see a race on that level. You learn a lot. It was my first day driving solo. You’re just working your way up in understanding. A few years into it, you find your groove and your way of doing things. You just have to get in there and get your hands dirty.” If a cyclist needs a new bike or medical assistance, the exchange between the team car and rider is similar to a pitstop in auto racing. It’s not uncommon for riders to take advantage of a team car’s speed and hang on too long for a rest. But race officials are watchful for infractions. “Team cars in road cycling is just part of the game,” said Bajadali, who rode as a passenger in team cars before assuming driving responsibilities. “It kind of equalizes the race where everyone has that kind of support and you can get down to business and do tactics and fast racing.” The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: jam... Professional road cyclists were once self-sustaining athletes. Vehicle support wasn't allowed in races like the Tour de France unless via unscrupulous means. Catching a rider getting assistance from a car meant disqualification. - Much has changed.
Much has changed. With various other company relationships for bicycles, helmets, sunglasses and energy food, vehicle sponsorship is as much part of a team as its riders.

The Rally Cycling Team supports its men's and women's team with 2019 Acura RDX sport utility vehicles. Images courtesy of Sam Wiebe/Rally Cycling Team.










Race organizers rely on manufacturer vehicles to keep the race intact and safe as it progresses along country roads and into mountain ranges.

Andrew Bajadali, a former pro cycling and director with the Rally Cycling Team, is our guest this week on Episode #119 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. We discuss how pro cycling teams rely on team vehicles to assist their riders.

Co-host James Raia talks with Bajadali from the passenger seat of a 2019 Acura RDX during the opening day of the team's training camp in Oxnard, California. Bruce Aldrich, the broadcast's other co-host, produced the episode from Sacramento.

During more than a four-hour team ride along the Pacific Coast Highways and into the surrounding foothills, Bajadali and I discuss the learning curve of the transition of a pro career into a director's role. It includes learning from other directors the ins-and-outs driving during races that may 150 cyclists and several-dozen team cars

“A team car is really there to support in all ways,” said Bajadali. “I don’t know if people who don’t know the ins-and-outs of the sport know how important it is to have a car there. It’s a major luxury.”

Unlike cycling teams of yesteryear that relied on panel vans or mini cars with questionable reliability, most current teams opt for all-wheel drive wagons or SUVs. One now-defunct team in recent years had two Porsche Panamera sports cars as support vehicles. It didn’t go well.

During training and races, team vehicles transport extra bikes, wheels, various equipment, food, water and medical equipment. If a race includes 20 teams, 40 team vehicles, plus official race vehicles, all advance along the route in an ever-changing processional that also may include 150 riders. Every team’s vehicles are detailed in team colors and have signage for its sponsors.

A road race may advance smoothly for hours on a long, open road. But chaos can occur in an instant after a crash. Team cars require skilled drivers, usually former pro cyclists, who negotiate winding roads often at high speeds to assist riders.

“Basically, you’re just always learning,” said Bajadali who first drove a team car in the early season Dubai Tour. “It was amazing just to see a race on that level. You learn a lot. It was my first day driving solo. You’re just working your way up in understanding. A few years into it, you find your groove and your way of doing things.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 31:01
#118, Alex Guberman: YouTube electric vehicle expert https://theweeklydriver.com/2020/01/118-alex-guberman-youtube-electric-vehicle-expert/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=118-alex-guberman-youtube-electric-vehicle-expert Mon, 06 Jan 2020 17:36:18 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32170 Alex Guberman is a force in the electric vehicle industry. A recent new resident in Sacramento, Guberman publishes the increasingly popular YouTube Channel, E For Electric. A native of Moscow, Russia, the former resident of the Silicon Valley, is also a former Tesla owner. But he's also passionate about Byton, for which he's worked as an ambassador, and other prominent and pending electric vehicle manufacturers. Alex Guberman is a prominent electric vehicle expert on YouTube and on other social media platforms. Guberman is our guest on Episode #118 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Guberman, who moved to the United States in 1992, the current status of the electric vehicle industry and what the future may hold. Guberman, who in addition to his prominent YouTube, Instagram and Facebook prominence recently joined TikTok, has lots of opinions and he shares them with a keen knowledge of the fast-moving electric vehicle industry. For example, he appreciates Tesla and its status and the innovation of owner Elon Musk. But he's not a "fanboy." It's the term Guberman uses the describe those who follow the manufacturer without discretion. Guberman is prolific. He produces a lot of videos per day for his channel. He breaks electric vehicle news. He discusses trends in the industry and talks about his travels to vehicle debuts, including China. He was also our guest on Episode #76 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Alex Guberman is a force in the electric vehicle industry. A recent new resident in Sacramento, Guberman publishes the increasingly popular YouTube Channel, E For Electric. - A native of Moscow, Russia, the former resident of the Silicon Valley,
A native of Moscow, Russia, the former resident of the Silicon Valley, is also a former Tesla owner. But he's also passionate about Byton, for which he's worked as an ambassador, and other prominent and pending electric vehicle manufacturers.

Alex Guberman is a prominent electric vehicle expert on YouTube and on other social media platforms.

Guberman is our guest on Episode #118 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Guberman, who moved to the United States in 1992, the current status of the electric vehicle industry and what the future may hold.

Guberman, who in addition to his prominent YouTube, Instagram and Facebook prominence recently joined TikTok, has lots of opinions and he shares them with a keen knowledge of the fast-moving electric vehicle industry.

For example, he appreciates Tesla and its status and the innovation of owner Elon Musk. But he's not a "fanboy." It's the term Guberman uses the describe those who follow the manufacturer without discretion.

Guberman is prolific. He produces a lot of videos per day for his channel. He breaks electric vehicle news. He discusses trends in the industry and talks about his travels to vehicle debuts, including China. He was also our guest on Episode #76 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 41:45
#117, New decade auto predictions from Cars.com https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/12/117-new-decade-auto-predictions-from-cars-com/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=117-new-decade-auto-predictions-from-cars-com Mon, 30 Dec 2019 18:42:06 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32139 The automotive industry is ever-changing. Advancement in technology, autonomous driving and alternative fuels, keep manufacturers moving quickly. Joe Wiesenfelder, executive editor of Cars.com and a 25-year automotive expert, knows the industry trends as well as anyone. He's our guest on episode #117 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Joe Wisenfelder, executive editor of Cars.com, discusses the top-5 auto trends for the next decade. Wiesenfelder discusses with co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia the top five trends in the industry that will shape the automotive future for the next decade. Joe Wisenfelder, executive editor of Cars.com The prominent automotive website believes increasing consumer expectations, connected technology, rising loan prices, a pivotal presidential election, and an infatuation with electric and autonomous vehicles will shape the automotive future. As such, Wiesenfelder believes the consumer marketplace will offer markedly different experiences for buyers and sellers. The website's editors report: "As new competitors are entering and disrupting auto retail, car manufacturers are attempting to sell online, and car dealers are adopting new technology to change the car buying process forever. "But due to the expensive, personal and emotional nature of the car purchase, in the next decade, most consumers will still want and need to 'touch' and 'feel' their new vehicle before collecting the keys. By tapping into advanced technology on the market that better connects the online and in-store experience, car dealers are best positioned to dominate this space." Wisenfelder knows of what he speaks. He oversees a digital marketplace and solutions provider for the automotive industry online since 1998. Headquartered in Chicago, Cars.com provides data, resources and digital tools needed to make informed buying decisions. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   The automotive industry is ever-changing. Advancement in technology, autonomous driving and alternative fuels, keep manufacturers moving quickly. Joe Wiesenfelder, executive editor of Cars.com and a 25-year automotive expert, Cars.com and a 25-year automotive expert, knows the industry trends as well as anyone. He's our guest on episode #117 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Joe Wisenfelder, executive editor of Cars.com, discusses the top-5 auto trends for the next decade.

Wiesenfelder discusses with co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia the top five trends in the industry that will shape the automotive future for the next decade.

Joe Wisenfelder, executive editor of Cars.com

The prominent automotive website believes increasing consumer expectations, connected technology, rising loan prices, a pivotal presidential election, and an infatuation with electric and autonomous vehicles will shape the automotive future.

As such, Wiesenfelder believes the consumer marketplace will offer markedly different experiences for buyers and sellers.

The website's editors report:

"As new competitors are entering and disrupting auto retail, car manufacturers are attempting to sell online, and car dealers are adopting new technology to change the car buying process forever.

"But due to the expensive, personal and emotional nature of the car purchase, in the next decade, most consumers will still want and need to 'touch' and 'feel' their new vehicle before collecting the keys. By tapping into advanced technology on the market that better connects the online and in-store experience, car dealers are best positioned to dominate this space."

Wisenfelder knows of what he speaks. He oversees a digital marketplace and solutions provider for the automotive industry online since 1998. Headquartered in Chicago, Cars.com provides data, resources and digital tools needed to make informed buying decisions.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 33:12
#116, The Weekly Driver Podcast’s 2019 Best Cars, Trucks https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/12/116-the-weekly-driver-podcasts-2019-best-cars-trucks/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=116-the-weekly-driver-podcasts-2019-best-cars-trucks Tue, 17 Dec 2019 20:30:18 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32122 The Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 to the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid and the Kia K900 to the Toyota Camry. These four diverse vehicles are on the list of the 2019 Best Cars and Trucks of the Year, announced by The Weekly Driver Podcast. Podcast co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the list on episode #116 of the weekly program that reports on all things automotive. The 2019 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 is among the top-10 Cars and Trucks of 2019, according to Bruce Aldrich and James Raia, co-hosts of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Image © James Raia. As is our logical way, we wait until the end of the year to name our selections. As in previous years, the 2019 choices were selected only from the list of 35-40 cars and trucks manufacturers provided for weekly reviews for my weekly syndicated automotive column. It's published by Bay Area News Group in San Jose, California, Motors Matters in Delaware and Gulfshore Business in Naples, Florida. Bruce also drove most of the cars on the list and we have a lively discussion during the podcast. Which is to say, we disagreed on some of the choices. The 10 vehicles on the 2019 Best Cars and Trucks list include manufacturers from the United States, South Korea and Japan. The Weekly Driver has been writing about our main automotive vent for years. How do prestigious industry publications determine their vehicles-of-the-year selections before the calendar year starts? Selecting a list of the year’s best at the end of the calendar year makes sense. How can a 2020 list be announced (several have) in December of 2019 when not all of the 2020 models vehicles are available. Here's the list in alphabetical order of the 2019 Best Cars and Trucks of the Year: Chevrolet Camaro ZL1, Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid, GMC Sierra, Honda Civic, Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid, Infiniti QX80, Kia K900, Lexus LS500, Subaru Ascent, Toyota Camry. The Kia K900 is among The Weekly Driver Podcast's 2019 Best Cars and Trucks. All of the vehicles on the list are reviewed on The Weekly Driver.com. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   The Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 to the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid and the Kia K900 to the Toyota Camry. These four diverse vehicles are on the list of the 2019 Best Cars and Trucks of the Year, announced by The Weekly Driver Podcast. -
Podcast co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the list on episode #116 of the weekly program that reports on all things automotive.

The 2019 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 is among the top-10 Cars and Trucks of 2019, according to Bruce Aldrich and James Raia, co-hosts of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Image © James Raia.

As is our logical way, we wait until the end of the year to name our selections. As in previous years, the 2019 choices were selected only from the list of 35-40 cars and trucks manufacturers provided for weekly reviews for my weekly syndicated automotive column. It's published by Bay Area News Group in San Jose, California, Motors Matters in Delaware and Gulfshore Business in Naples, Florida.

Bruce also drove most of the cars on the list and we have a lively discussion during the podcast. Which is to say, we disagreed on some of the choices.

The 10 vehicles on the 2019 Best Cars and Trucks list include manufacturers from the United States, South Korea and Japan.

The Weekly Driver has been writing about our main automotive vent for years. How do prestigious industry publications determine their vehicles-of-the-year selections before the calendar year starts?

Selecting a list of the year’s best at the end of the calendar year makes sense. How can a 2020 list be announced (several have) in December of 2019 when not all of the 2020 models vehicles are available.

Here's the list in alphabetical order of the 2019 Best Cars and Trucks of the Year:

Chevrolet Camaro ZL1, Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid, GMC Sierra, Honda Civic, Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid, Infiniti QX80, Kia K900, Lexus LS500, Subaru Ascent, Toyota Camry.

The Kia K900 is among The Weekly Driver Podcast's 2019 Best Cars and Trucks.

All of the vehicles on the list are reviewed on The Weekly Driver.com.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 35:39
#115, Charity sweepstakes starts for 36 rare Corvettes https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/12/115-charity-sweepstakes-starts-for-36-rare-corvettes/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=115-charity-sweepstakes-starts-for-36-rare-corvettes Tue, 10 Dec 2019 01:35:20 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32083 It's difficult to imagine a more impressive integration of charity, automotive history and philanthropic generosity than "The Lost Corvettes" sweepstakes. The group called Corvette Heroes has launched a national sweepstakes in which 36 classic Corvettes will be the prizes. The collection includes one vehicle from 1953, the year the iconic car was introduced, through a 1989 model. The Corvette Heroes charity will give away 36 Corvettes in a sweepstakes. Chris Mazzilli of the Gotham (New York) Comedy Club and a renowned Corvette expert as the owner of Dream Car Restorations on Long Island, N.Y., is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Mazzilli, who's among the group of New York real estate and parking garage professionals who comprise the Corvette Heroes, talks with co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia about the project and its usual circumstances. The collection is known both as "The Lost Corvettes" and the Peter Max Collection because the renowned pop artist once owned the vehicles. He was going to use the cars as canvases for a series of paintings but never pursued the project. The cars were stored in parking garages throughout New York for more than 25 years. But a few years ago, a representative for Max reached out to Scott Heller, who for two decades helped his friend move the cars to the garages. The agent asked Heller if he was interested in purchasing the collection. Heller discussed the offer with his sons Michael and Adam Heller, and his cousin Peter Heller, as well as real estate associates Gary, Adam and Fred Spindler. They contacted Mazzilli to determine what it would take to restore the cars. Mazzilli compiled a detailed analysis for the group on what each car needed and the cost of repairs and then the decision was made to purchase the entire collection. Among the vehicles is a 1953 Corvette, among the rarest years of the automotive icon. The collection also includes a 1956 Corvette, resplendent in Cascade Green, and a highly coveted 1967 Corvette convertible. Mazzilli also discusses the restoration details and the idea to make the project into a charity with the podcast co-hosts. Proceeds from the sweepstakes of what is believed to be the greatest collection of Corvettes in history will go to American military veterans through the National Guard Educational Foundation. To participate in the sweepstakes, donation entries (ages 18 years of age or older) are $3 each with discounts for multiple entries. Visit www.thelostcorvettesgiveaway.com. The deadline is April 30. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio It's difficult to imagine a more impressive integration of charity, automotive history and philanthropic generosity than "The Lost Corvettes" sweepstakes. - The group called Corvette Heroes has launched a national sweepstakes in which 36 classic Corve...
The group called Corvette Heroes has launched a national sweepstakes in which 36 classic Corvettes will be the prizes. The collection includes one vehicle from 1953, the year the iconic car was introduced, through a 1989 model.

The Corvette Heroes charity will give away 36 Corvettes in a sweepstakes.

Chris Mazzilli of the Gotham (New York) Comedy Club and a renowned Corvette expert as the owner of Dream Car Restorations on Long Island, N.Y., is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Mazzilli, who's among the group of New York real estate and parking garage professionals who comprise the Corvette Heroes, talks with co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia about the project and its usual circumstances.

The collection is known both as "The Lost Corvettes" and the Peter Max Collection because the renowned pop artist once owned the vehicles. He was going to use the cars as canvases for a series of paintings but never pursued the project.

The cars were stored in parking garages throughout New York for more than 25 years. But a few years ago, a representative for Max reached out to Scott Heller, who for two decades helped his friend move the cars to the garages.

The agent asked Heller if he was interested in purchasing the collection. Heller discussed the offer with his sons Michael and Adam Heller, and his cousin Peter Heller, as well as real estate associates Gary, Adam and Fred Spindler.

They contacted Mazzilli to determine what it would take to restore the cars. Mazzilli compiled a detailed analysis for the group on what each car needed and the cost of repairs and then the decision was made to purchase the entire collection.

Among the vehicles is a 1953 Corvette, among the rarest years of the automotive icon. The collection also includes a 1956 Corvette, resplendent in Cascade Green, and a highly coveted 1967 Corvette convertible.

Mazzilli also discusses the restoration details and the idea to make the project into a charity with the podcast co-hosts.

Proceeds from the sweepstakes of what is believed to be the greatest collection of Corvettes in history will go to American military veterans through the National Guard Educational Foundation.

To participate in the sweepstakes, donation entries (ages 18 years of age or older) are $3 each with discounts for multiple entries. Visit www.thelostcorvettesgiveaway.com. The deadline is April 30.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 26:00
#114, Indianapolis Motor Speedway set for driverless race https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/12/114-indianapolis-motor-speedway-set-for-driverless-race/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=114-indianapolis-motor-speedway-set-for-driverless-race Thu, 05 Dec 2019 01:56:55 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32058 The Indianapolis Motor Speedway has been the home to many of motorsports' greatest drivers and races. In less than two years, the renowned racetrack will host another iconic racing event — without drivers. The speedway (IMS) and Energy Systems Network (ESN) recently announced a two-year, $1 million prize competition that will culminate in a head-to-head, high-speed autonomous vehicle race Oct. 23, 2021, around the Speedway's famed 2.5-mile oval. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway will host an autonomous car race in 2021. Matt Peak, director of mobility at Energy Systems Network, is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Peak talks with co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia about the pending event, The Indy Autonomous Challenge. The competition will be among universities to create software that enables self-driving Indy Lights race cars to compete in a head-to-head race on the IMS track. The development of the software can help speed the commercialization of fully autonomous vehicles and enhance existing advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) in people-driven cars. These technologies help drivers remain in control and avoid accidents by prompting awareness and improving accuracy. "What we're asking universities to do is hard," said Peak. "Our hope is that by bringing together and offering up to participating teams the world's premier automotive proving ground, performance chassis manufacturer, engineering research center and simulation platform, as well as nearly $1.5 million in total cash awards, universities will see the Challenge as not just throwing down the gauntlet but also extending the helping hand to accelerate innovation and the arrival of new technologies." The Challenge consists of five rounds. Teams submit a short white paper during the first round, and in the second round, teams must demonstrate vehicular automation by sharing a short video of an existing vehicle or by participating in Purdue University's self-driving go-kart competition at IMS. Five universities registered for the competition upon its opening this morning: Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology (KAIST), Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI), University of Florida, University of Illinois and the University of Virginia. Registration is open for accredited, tax-exempt colleges and universities (including foreign institutions of higher education) through Feb. 28, 2020. For more information and to register for the competition, visit www.indyautonomouschallenge.com. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio     The Indianapolis Motor Speedway has been the home to many of motorsports' greatest drivers and races. In less than two years, the renowned racetrack will host another iconic racing event — without drivers. -
The speedway (IMS) and Energy Systems Network (ESN) recently announced a two-year, $1 million prize competition that will culminate in a head-to-head, high-speed autonomous vehicle race Oct. 23, 2021, around the Speedway's famed 2.5-mile oval.

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway will host an autonomous car race in 2021.

Matt Peak, director of mobility at Energy Systems Network, is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Peak talks with co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia about the pending event, The Indy Autonomous Challenge. The competition will be among universities to create software that enables self-driving Indy Lights race cars to compete in a head-to-head race on the IMS track.

The development of the software can help speed the commercialization of fully autonomous vehicles and enhance existing advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) in people-driven cars. These technologies help drivers remain in control and avoid accidents by prompting awareness and improving accuracy.

"What we're asking universities to do is hard," said Peak. "Our hope is that by bringing together and offering up to participating teams the world's premier automotive proving ground, performance chassis manufacturer, engineering research center and simulation platform, as well as nearly $1.5 million in total cash awards, universities will see the Challenge as not just throwing down the gauntlet but also extending the helping hand to accelerate innovation and the arrival of new technologies."

The Challenge consists of five rounds. Teams submit a short white paper during the first round, and in the second round, teams must demonstrate vehicular automation by sharing a short video of an existing vehicle or by participating in Purdue University's self-driving go-kart competition at IMS.

Five universities registered for the competition upon its opening this morning: Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology (KAIST), Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI), University of Florida, University of Illinois and the University of Virginia.

Registration is open for accredited, tax-exempt colleges and universities (including foreign institutions of higher education) through Feb. 28, 2020.

For more information and to register for the competition, visit www.indyautonomouschallenge.com.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32041 Where you live and what kind of vehicle you drive has a lot to do with how much your car insurance is going to cost. carinsurance.com has all the data. It's crunched the numbers and determined the cheapest cars to insure in every state and the cheapest state in which to insure vehicles. The 2019 Fiat 500 Pop is the least expensive car to insure in 15 states, according to carinsurance.com Penny Gusner, a Consumer Analyst for the website, is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Gusner talks with co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia about the cheapest cars to insure in every state and how the results were determined. She details how cars are built and how other factors fit into the equation. Road quality, technology, weather, etc., all contribute to a vehicle's insurance rate. "Most new vehicles are loaded with technology and that can lead to a safety discount, but all of that technology also comes with increased repair costs," said Gusner. “In luxury vehicles, due materials used, a teak wood interior is much more expensive to repair than a plastic one.” CarInsurance.com’s numbers determined that 15 vehicles were the cheapest to insure in at least one state during 2019. Subaru has the best results. It has three models on the list. Fiat, Jeep, Mazda and Honda had two models on the list. The Fiat Pop 500 is the least expensive vehicle to insure in 15 states. Maine is the least expensive state to insure a car, with the Mazda CX-3 the least expensive vehicle in the state to insure at the cost of $695. Michigan is the most expensive state to insure a vehicle. The Ford F-150 costs $2,501 per year on average to insure. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Where you live and what kind of vehicle you drive has a lot to do with how much your car insurance is going to cost. carinsurance.com has all the data. - It's crunched the numbers and determined the cheapest cars to insure in every state and the cheap... carinsurance.com has all the data.

It's crunched the numbers and determined the cheapest cars to insure in every state and the cheapest state in which to insure vehicles.

The 2019 Fiat 500 Pop is the least expensive car to insure in 15 states, according to carinsurance.com

Penny Gusner, a Consumer Analyst for the website, is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Gusner talks with co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia about the cheapest cars to insure in every state and how the results were determined. She details how cars are built and how other factors fit into the equation. Road quality, technology, weather, etc., all contribute to a vehicle's insurance rate.

"Most new vehicles are loaded with technology and that can lead to a safety discount, but all of that technology also comes with increased repair costs," said Gusner. “In luxury vehicles, due materials used, a teak wood interior is much more expensive to repair than a plastic one.”

CarInsurance.com’s numbers determined that 15 vehicles were the cheapest to insure in at least one state during 2019.
Subaru has the best results. It has three models on the list. Fiat, Jeep, Mazda and Honda had two models on the list. The Fiat Pop 500 is the least expensive vehicle to insure in 15 states.

Maine is the least expensive state to insure a car, with the Mazda CX-3 the least expensive vehicle in the state to insure at the cost of $695. Michigan is the most expensive state to insure a vehicle. The Ford F-150 costs $2,501 per year on average to insure.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 29:15
#112, LA Auto Show, Day 2: Kia president touts new Seltos SUV https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/11/112-la-auto-show-day-2-kia-president-touts-new-seltos-suv/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=112-la-auto-show-day-2-kia-president-touts-new-seltos-suv Thu, 21 Nov 2019 01:07:14 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32067 The huge banner promotes the 2019 Kia Telluride as the Motor Trend sport utility vehicle of the year. It's a perfect marketing location for the manufacturer since the signage is hanging above the Los Angeles Convention Center, the site of the 2019 LA Auto Show. Named the 2020 SUV of the year, the Telluride also has a new stablemate, the 2021 Kia Seltos. It's positioned between the Kia Soul and Sportage as an entry-level SUV. Michael Cole, President of Kia Motors America, unveils the 2021 Kia Seltos at the Los Angeles Auto Show. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2019 Michael Cole, the newly named President of Kia Motors America, is our guest on Day 2 of The Weekly Driver Podcast special episodes from the LA Auto Show. Co-host Bruce Aldrich and James Raia speak with Cole about two hours after he presided over the reveal of the Seltos to a large crowd of media representatives on Day 2 of this year's show. While seated in a conference room overlooking a showroom floor, we discuss with Cole the anticipated debut of the entry-level SUV. According to Kia, the Seltos "combines the SUV capability of available All-Wheel Drive with advanced driver assistance technologies, available Bose premium sound and exceptional cargo space." While the price of the Seltos hasn't been announced, it's expected to debut next February. Cole also discusses the history of Kia, how the company decided on its new SUV's name, the status of the industry and the continuing popularity of the SUV segment. Kia hasn't announced its plans for the electric or autonomous vehicle segment but Cole commented: "We'll be ready, rest assured." Join us for an engaging episode. Cole is enthusiastic and optimistic about the future of Kia. And he convinced us. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   The huge banner promotes the 2019 Kia Telluride as the Motor Trend sport utility vehicle of the year. It's a perfect marketing location for the manufacturer since the signage is hanging above the Los Angeles Convention Center,
Named the 2020 SUV of the year, the Telluride also has a new stablemate, the 2021 Kia Seltos. It's positioned between the Kia Soul and Sportage as an entry-level SUV.

Michael Cole, President of Kia Motors America, unveils the 2021 Kia Seltos at the Los Angeles Auto Show. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2019

Michael Cole, the newly named President of Kia Motors America, is our guest on Day 2 of The Weekly Driver Podcast special episodes from the LA Auto Show.

Co-host Bruce Aldrich and James Raia speak with Cole about two hours after he presided over the reveal of the Seltos to a large crowd of media representatives on Day 2 of this year's show.

While seated in a conference room overlooking a showroom floor, we discuss with Cole the anticipated debut of the entry-level SUV.

According to Kia, the Seltos "combines the SUV capability of available All-Wheel Drive with advanced driver assistance technologies, available Bose premium sound and exceptional cargo space."

While the price of the Seltos hasn't been announced, it's expected to debut next February.

Cole also discusses the history of Kia, how the company decided on its new SUV's name, the status of the industry and the continuing popularity of the SUV segment.

Kia hasn't announced its plans for the electric or autonomous vehicle segment but Cole commented: "We'll be ready, rest assured."

Join us for an engaging episode. Cole is enthusiastic and optimistic about the future of Kia. And he convinced us.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 20:09
#111, Day 1: LA Auto Show: Brembo, Bollinger Motors https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/11/111-day-1-la-auto-show-brembo-bollinger-motors/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=111-day-1-la-auto-show-brembo-bollinger-motors Wed, 20 Nov 2019 01:28:26 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32060 Welcome to The Weekly Driver Podcast. We're broadcasting special daily episodes this week from the 2019 Los Angeles Auto Show at the LA Convention Center. It's the day before the showroom floors open for the global and North American debuts of several dozen vehicle debuts. But there's still plenty to see and discuss. Bollinger Motors is exhibiting the pre-production models of its utilitarian, electric pickups at the LA Auto Show. Image © Bruce Alrdrich/2019 Co-hosts James Raia and Bruce Aldrich conduct interviews with Daniel Sandberg, President and CEO at Brembo North America, Inc., and Robert Bollinger, CEO of Bollinger Motors. The two executives couldn't be further apart in their respective areas of expertise in the automotive landscape. Sandberg oversees the industry's most well-known innovator of premium disc brake technology. Brembo is showcasing its braking systems at the LA Auto Show. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2019. In addition to its long history in the racing industry, Brembo is the forefront in the design, development and production of braking systems and components for passenger cars, motorbikes, industrial vehicles and machinery. Sandberg discusses the company's involvement in the various markets. He also talks about the continuation of a previous career. A former radio announcer in Detroit, Sandberg hosts the Brembo Red Podcast. Guests have included Jay Leno, Adam Carolla and Wayne Carini. Bollinger manufactures the B1 Electric Sport Utility Truck and B2 Electric Pickup Truck. Both are currently in pre-production mode. The company recently announced the aluminum truck's debut MSRP of $125,000, with reservations of $1,000 available for the pending two vehicles. A 4x4 off-road and street legal, all-wheel-drive electric truck, Bollinger's utilitarian looks challenge the norms of mainstream truck design. Its specs include a 200-mile range, 514 horsepower dual motor and 15-inch ground clearance. For additional information about Brembo, visit: www.brembo.com. For additional information about Bollinger Motors, visit: www.bollingermotors.com. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Welcome to The Weekly Driver Podcast. We're broadcasting special daily episodes this week from the 2019 Los Angeles Auto Show at the LA Convention Center. - It's the day before the showroom floors open for the global and North American debuts of sever...
It's the day before the showroom floors open for the global and North American debuts of several dozen vehicle debuts. But there's still plenty to see and discuss.

Bollinger Motors is exhibiting the pre-production models of its utilitarian, electric pickups at the LA Auto Show. Image © Bruce Alrdrich/2019

Co-hosts James Raia and Bruce Aldrich conduct interviews with Daniel Sandberg, President and CEO at Brembo North America, Inc., and Robert Bollinger, CEO of Bollinger Motors.

The two executives couldn't be further apart in their respective areas of expertise in the automotive landscape.

Sandberg oversees the industry's most well-known innovator of premium disc brake technology.

Brembo is showcasing its braking systems at the LA Auto Show. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2019.

In addition to its long history in the racing industry, Brembo is the forefront in the design, development and production of braking systems and components for passenger cars, motorbikes, industrial vehicles and machinery.

Sandberg discusses the company's involvement in the various markets. He also talks about the continuation of a previous career. A former radio announcer in Detroit, Sandberg hosts the Brembo Red Podcast. Guests have included Jay Leno, Adam Carolla and Wayne Carini.

Bollinger manufactures the B1 Electric Sport Utility Truck and B2 Electric Pickup Truck. Both are currently in pre-production mode. The company recently announced the aluminum truck's debut MSRP of $125,000, with reservations of $1,000 available for the pending two vehicles.

A 4x4 off-road and street legal, all-wheel-drive electric truck, Bollinger's utilitarian looks challenge the norms of mainstream truck design. Its specs include a 200-mile range, 514 horsepower dual motor and 15-inch ground clearance.

For additional information about Brembo, visit: www.brembo.com.

For additional information about Bollinger Motors, visit: www.bollingermotors.com.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 44:06
#110, What’s in a used car color? Beige saves big bucks https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/11/110-whats-in-a-used-car-color-beige-saves-big-bucks/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=110-whats-in-a-used-car-color-beige-saves-big-bucks Tue, 12 Nov 2019 01:44:02 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=32027 Julie Blackley is a favorite guest on The Weekly Driver Podcast. She's an analyst for iseecars.com, the Boston-based online automotive search engine and research website. Blackley is a whirlwind of automotive industry statistics, and she's the first guest who's joined us three times. Used Toyota Sienna vans in beige are a great car color for good discounts, according to iseecars.com. During this episode, Bruce Aldrich and I discuss with Julie how certain exterior car colors are more likely to result in significant savings for used car shoppers according to a recent study the company conducted. The automotive research firm analyzed more than 4.1 million vehicles to determine which car colors were more likely to provide deals, defined as savings of at least 10 percent of a car’s market value. The analysis found less-popular colors don’t always amount to the most significant savings. Both common and uncommon colors can provide deals to used car shoppers. The average vehicle has significant savings on 11.3 percent of its inventory. The car color where consumers are most likely to find a deal is beige, which is 24.3 percent more likely to have a deal than the average vehicle. Ranking ninth in terms of popularity among vehicle colors, beige is not among the most popular color choices for consumers . . . black, white, silver and gray. The Volkswagen Passat, Chevrolet Malibu, Chevrolet Equinox and Toyota Sienna are among the most popular cars available in beige. Julie also discusses how the industry and public have reacted to the current survey on iseecars.com. In previous episodes, Julie discussed: Best End of the Year Deals (Episode #66) Best Depreciation After Five Years of Ownership (Episode #57) The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Julie Blackley is a favorite guest on The Weekly Driver Podcast. She's an analyst for iseecars.com, the Boston-based online automotive search engine and research website. - Blackley is a whirlwind of automotive industry statistics, iseecars.com, the Boston-based online automotive search engine and research website.

Blackley is a whirlwind of automotive industry statistics, and she's the first guest who's joined us three times.

Used Toyota Sienna vans in beige are a great car color for good discounts, according to iseecars.com.

During this episode, Bruce Aldrich and I discuss with Julie how certain exterior car colors are more likely to result in significant savings for used car shoppers according to a recent study the company conducted.

The automotive research firm analyzed more than 4.1 million vehicles to determine which car colors were more likely to provide deals, defined as savings of at least 10 percent of a car’s market value.

The analysis found less-popular colors don’t always amount to the most significant savings. Both common and uncommon colors can provide deals to used car shoppers.

The average vehicle has significant savings on 11.3 percent of its inventory. The car color where consumers are most likely to find a deal is beige, which is 24.3 percent more likely to have a deal than the average vehicle. Ranking ninth in terms of popularity among vehicle colors, beige is not among the most popular color choices for consumers . . . black, white, silver and gray.

The Volkswagen Passat, Chevrolet Malibu, Chevrolet Equinox and Toyota Sienna are among the most popular cars available in beige.

Julie also discusses how the industry and public have reacted to the current survey on iseecars.com.

In previous episodes, Julie discussed:

Best End of the Year Deals (Episode #66)

Best Depreciation After Five Years of Ownership (Episode #57)

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 23:29
#109, Sacramento collector talks vintage cars https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/10/109-sacramento-collector-talks-vintage-cars/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=109-sacramento-collector-talks-vintage-cars Mon, 28 Oct 2019 04:53:41 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31990 Like other ollectors, Joe Palmer of Sacramento has a passion for vintage cars with character, and chrome. If a vehicle has a long history, Palmern takes pleasure in sharing its pedigree. The real estate businessman and musician currently owns 14 cars and he's possessed more than 30 vehicles. He likes Lincoln, Cadillac and Rolls-Royce. And he also has a 1956 Bentley and a 1966 Ford Mustang. Joe Palmer of Sacramento has a collective of 14 vintage cars. Palmer, 59, is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia talked with the collector recently from inside one of his vintage Lincolns that was just purchased a young woman from Southern California. The Lincoln and many of his other vehicles are located in the backyard of his Midtown Sacramento home. He has the 23rd of 25 Rolls-Royce ever made and he has a 1941 Lincoln that weighs nearly 4,000 pounds and has a V12 engine. Palmer enjoys tinkering, restoring and talking about all things cars. He appreciates little things about cars as much as how they perform. He likes the loud sound of big, booming horns. And he appreciates moveable emblems as much power. He knows the value of vintage cars, but he also seemingly equally appreciates them as works of art and history on wheels. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Like other ollectors, Joe Palmer of Sacramento has a passion for vintage cars with character, and chrome. If a vehicle has a long history, Palmern takes pleasure in sharing its pedigree. - The real estate businessman and musician currently owns 14 car...
The real estate businessman and musician currently owns 14 cars and he's possessed more than 30 vehicles. He likes Lincoln, Cadillac and Rolls-Royce. And he also has a 1956 Bentley and a 1966 Ford Mustang.

Joe Palmer of Sacramento has a collective of 14 vintage cars.

Palmer, 59, is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia talked with the collector recently from inside one of his vintage Lincolns that was just purchased a young woman from Southern California.

The Lincoln and many of his other vehicles are located in the backyard of his Midtown Sacramento home. He has the 23rd of 25 Rolls-Royce ever made and he has a 1941 Lincoln that weighs nearly 4,000 pounds and has a V12 engine.

Palmer enjoys tinkering, restoring and talking about all things cars. He appreciates little things about cars as much as how they perform. He likes the loud sound of big, booming horns. And he appreciates moveable emblems as much power. He knows the value of vintage cars, but he also seemingly equally appreciates them as works of art and history on wheels.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 36:46
#108, Vintage auto poster collecting expert Tony Singer https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/10/107-vintage-auto-poster-collecting-expert-tony-singer/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=107-vintage-auto-poster-collecting-expert-tony-singer Tue, 22 Oct 2019 20:02:20 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31977 Everett Anton Singer, known mostly by everyone as Tony, is a vintage auto poster collecting expert and founder of Automobilia Monterey. It's the memorabilia segment of Monterey Auto Week, the yearly August gathering of car shows, auctions and nearly every component of the industry. Expanded to three days this year, Singer's vintage automotive posters were an integral part of the show held at the Embassy Suites in Seaside. And he's our guest on this week's episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Tony Singer is an expert in the niche collecting market of vintage auto posters. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Singer the world of vintage auto poster collecting and as well the larger scope of car memorabilia. Singer, who has been in the vintage automobile poster business since 1980, publishes the website www.vintageautoposters.com. It features a vast collection of posters and other memorabilia. Our guest discusses various areas of poster collecting — automotive-related movies and celebrities to racetracks and iconic events. He also details fraud in the industry, how the marketplace has changed and his travels around the world to find rare authentic posters. As Singer states on the website: "Whether building a collection or seeking a single decorative piece, most discerning buyers have sought expertise and personal service. The vast inventory begins in the late 1890s and runs primarily through the 1960s, featuring marque, event, and product advertising. Each poster is guaranteed original and is professionally archival linen mounted. Sizes are indicated in inches. Also available is a fine assortment of vintage auto-related window cards, signs and pins." Monterey Automobilia in 2020 will be held Aug. 10-12. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio Everett Anton Singer, known mostly by everyone as Tony, is a vintage auto poster collecting expert and founder of Automobilia Monterey. It's the memorabilia segment of Monterey Auto Week, the yearly August gathering of car shows, Monterey Auto Week, the yearly August gathering of car shows, auctions and nearly every component of the industry.

Expanded to three days this year, Singer's vintage automotive posters were an integral part of the show held at the Embassy Suites in Seaside. And he's our guest on this week's episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Tony Singer is an expert in the niche collecting market of vintage auto posters.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Singer the world of vintage auto poster collecting and as well the larger scope of car memorabilia.

Singer, who has been in the vintage automobile poster business since 1980, publishes the website www.vintageautoposters.com. It features a vast collection of posters and other memorabilia.

Our guest discusses various areas of poster collecting — automotive-related movies and celebrities to racetracks and iconic events. He also details fraud in the industry, how the marketplace has changed and his travels around the world to find rare authentic posters.

As Singer states on the website:

"Whether building a collection or seeking a single decorative piece, most discerning buyers have sought expertise and personal service. The vast inventory begins in the late 1890s and runs primarily through the 1960s, featuring marque, event, and product advertising.

Each poster is guaranteed original and is professionally archival linen mounted. Sizes are indicated in inches. Also available is a fine assortment of vintage auto-related window cards, signs and pins."

Monterey Automobilia in 2020 will be held Aug. 10-12.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 43:48
#107, LA Auto Show set for industry spotlight https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/10/107-la-auto-show-set-for-industry-spotlight/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=107-la-auto-show-set-for-industry-spotlight Mon, 14 Oct 2019 23:28:16 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31975 The yearly LA Auto Show is about a month away. It’s always a must-attend event as the first major car show of the automotive season despite is unique dates near the end of the calendar year. Alexis Evans, the show’s communications director, is our guest on Episode #107 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. The Byton all-electric sports car debut at the 2018 LA Auto Show. Image © James Raia/2018 Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss this year’s show with Evans. The event’s public days are scheduled Nov. 22. to Dec. 1 at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The location is the multi-floor, multi-hall venue for dozens of manufacturers and the North American or global debuts of their vehicles. With the vastness of the LA Convention Center, the show provides an all-encompassing automotive experience. It’s all about entry-level cars, top-end luxury vehicles, the ever-expanding alternative fuel industry, custom made machines and unique concepts. In addition to her communications’ responsibilities, Evans also oversees the top-10 start-up competition, Hackathon, for Automobility. It’s the four-day press and trade show that precedes the public show. With several halls of new vehicles, Evans shares tips for attending the show. She explains that unlike visiting a car dealership, the public is encouraged to ask manufacturers, sometimes called ambassadors, about the new vehicles. The carmakers’ representatives aren’t salespeople, but happy to help Evans reminds potential visitors the LA Auto can be a hands-on experience. Test drives are offered by many manufacturers. Several companies have interactive exhibits. The LA Convention Center is located in one of the busiest areas of metropolitan Los Angeles. Evans provides suggestions for parking and well as public transportation. Comprehensive details are available via the website https://laautoshow.com. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   The yearly LA Auto Show is about a month away. It’s always a must-attend event as the first major car show of the automotive season despite is unique dates near the end of the calendar year. Alexis Evans, the show’s communications director, Alexis Evans, the show’s communications director, is our guest on Episode #107 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.


The Byton all-electric sports car debut at the 2018 LA Auto Show. Image © James Raia/2018
Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss this year’s show with Evans. The event’s public days are scheduled Nov. 22. to Dec. 1 at the Los Angeles Convention Center.
The location is the multi-floor, multi-hall venue for dozens of manufacturers and the North American or global debuts of their vehicles. With the vastness of the LA Convention Center, the show provides an all-encompassing automotive experience.
It’s all about entry-level cars, top-end luxury vehicles, the ever-expanding alternative fuel industry, custom made machines and unique concepts.
In addition to her communications’ responsibilities, Evans also oversees the top-10 start-up competition, Hackathon, for Automobility. It’s the four-day press and trade show that precedes the public show.
With several halls of new vehicles, Evans shares tips for attending the show. She explains that unlike visiting a car dealership, the public is encouraged to ask manufacturers, sometimes called ambassadors, about the new vehicles. The carmakers’ representatives aren’t salespeople, but happy to help
Evans reminds potential visitors the LA Auto can be a hands-on experience. Test drives are offered by many manufacturers. Several companies have interactive exhibits.
The LA Convention Center is located in one of the busiest areas of metropolitan Los Angeles. Evans provides suggestions for parking and well as public transportation.
Comprehensive details are available via the website https://laautoshow.com.
The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.
Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play

iTunes

Spotify

Stitcher

iheartradio



 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 27:55
#106, Andrew Noakes’ new book celebrates Bentley centenary https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/10/106-andrew-noakes-new-book-celebrates-bentley-centenary/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=106-andrew-noakes-new-book-celebrates-bentley-centenary Sat, 05 Oct 2019 06:43:53 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31946 Sometimes forgotten in the 100-year legacy of Bentley is the English manufacturer's legacy at LeMans, the famous French racetrack and its 24-hour race. Joseph Bentley, the company earlier in-house designer was against the idea of participating in the event. He believed it was too severe to race a car at top speeds for 24 hours. Andrew Noakes' new book celebrates Bentley on its 100th anniversary. But after attending the race, Bentley changed his mind and the manufacturer changed its perspective. Bentley won five of the first eight 24 Hours of LeMans events beginning in 1924 — and the legacy of the luxury vehicle had begun. Andrew Noakes, the author of the new book 100 Years of Bentley, writes about Bentley's legacy at LeMans and many other topics in his volume that celebrates the manufacturer's centenary. Noakes is our guest from England in Episode #106 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Noakes the celebration of of the iconic carbuilder — from its earliest models to its modern-day vehicles. Featuring more than 200 images, including some never seen in prints, 100 Years of Bentley include the history of W.O. Bentley’s early days as a railway engineer along with his first attempts at modifying French DFP cars, to the company’s early racing exploits. Despite its prominence, Bentley has endured financial difficulties One result was its acquisition by Rolls-Royce in 1933. The respective brands’ vehicles were exceedingly similar, particularly during the 1970s. The companies separated in 1998 after a contentious legal negotiation. Rolls-Royce is now owned by BMW; Bentley is part of Volkswagen AG. Bentley’s reliance on others for its continuing heritage doesn’t diminish its long tenure of individualism. It's all in the book and it's all part of our interview with Noakes. Please join us. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Sometimes forgotten in the 100-year legacy of Bentley is the English manufacturer's legacy at LeMans, the famous French racetrack and its 24-hour race. - Joseph Bentley, the company earlier in-house designer was against the idea of participating in th...
Joseph Bentley, the company earlier in-house designer was against the idea of participating in the event. He believed it was too severe to race a car at top speeds for 24 hours.

Andrew Noakes' new book celebrates Bentley on its 100th anniversary.

But after attending the race, Bentley changed his mind and the manufacturer changed its perspective. Bentley won five of the first eight 24 Hours of LeMans events beginning in 1924 — and the legacy of the luxury vehicle had begun.

Andrew Noakes, the author of the new book 100 Years of Bentley, writes about Bentley's legacy at LeMans and many other topics in his volume that celebrates the manufacturer's centenary.

Noakes is our guest from England in Episode #106 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Noakes the celebration of of the iconic carbuilder — from its earliest models to its modern-day vehicles.

Featuring more than 200 images, including some never seen in prints, 100 Years of Bentley include the history of W.O. Bentley’s early days as a railway engineer along with his first attempts at modifying French DFP cars, to the company’s early racing exploits.

Despite its prominence, Bentley has endured financial difficulties One result was its acquisition by Rolls-Royce in 1933. The respective brands’ vehicles were exceedingly similar, particularly during the 1970s.

The companies separated in 1998 after a contentious legal negotiation. Rolls-Royce is now owned by BMW; Bentley is part of Volkswagen AG.

Bentley’s reliance on others for its continuing heritage doesn’t diminish its long tenure of individualism.

It's all in the book and it's all part of our interview with Noakes. Please join us.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 35:57
#105, Stuntman Robert Nagle talks Ford v Ferrari, long career https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/10/105-stuntman-robert-nagle-talks-ford-v-ferrari-long-career/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=105-stuntman-robert-nagle-talks-ford-v-ferrari-long-career Wed, 02 Oct 2019 00:06:33 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31916 Robert Nagle is a Hollywood star. But he’s unheralded except for industry insiders who know his stuntman and engineering talents. Name a movie with the hard-to-fathom automotive scenes and Nagle problem was part of it. Nagle’s current project is the soon-to-be-released movie Ford v Ferrari, and he’s our guest on Episode #105 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Matt Damon and Christian Bale star in the racing movie Ford v Ferrari. In 2015, Nagle was awarded an Academy Technical Achievement Award (with Allan Padelford). The honor was presented for the self-propelled, high-performance, drivable camera and vehicle platform dubbed "The Biscuit Jr.”). The platform was named after a similar giant rig put on mechanical horses on to film the actors up close in the movie Sea Biscuit. The vehicle was also used in the movie Aviator. Tragedy struck when the platform was lost in a fire. Biscuit Jr., was made a few years later. And it's an integral part of Ford v Ferrari. The movie, which premiered at the recent Toronto Film Festival and Telluride Film Festival, is scheduled for nationwide release November 15.   The movis stars Christian Bale as British-born driving icon Ken Miles and Matt Damon as Carroll Shelby, the visionary car builder. They’re dispatched by Henry Ford II and Lee Iacocca, then an executive with Ford, with the mission of building the Ford GT40, a new car with the potential to finally defeat the perennially dominant Ferrari. Shelby and Miles battle corporate interference, the laws of physics and their individual demons to build a revolutionary race car for Ford and challenge Ferrari at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1966. During our podcast, Nagle discusses working with Damon and Bale and training the actors to a skill level above what they'll need to for the movie. Nagle also discusses his long tenure in filmmaking and gives us behind-the-scenes insight into working with famous actors, the art of his craft and revisits his long career. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio Robert Nagle is a Hollywood star. But he’s unheralded except for industry insiders who know his stuntman and engineering talents. Name a movie with the hard-to-fathom automotive scenes and Nagle problem was part of it. -
Nagle’s current project is the soon-to-be-released movie Ford v Ferrari, and he’s our guest on Episode #105 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Matt Damon and Christian Bale star in the racing movie Ford v Ferrari.

In 2015, Nagle was awarded an Academy Technical Achievement Award (with Allan Padelford). The honor was presented for the self-propelled, high-performance, drivable camera and vehicle platform dubbed "The Biscuit Jr.”).

The platform was named after a similar giant rig put on mechanical horses on to film the actors up close in the movie Sea Biscuit. The vehicle was also used in the movie Aviator.

Tragedy struck when the platform was lost in a fire. Biscuit Jr., was made a few years later. And it's an integral part of Ford v Ferrari.

The movie, which premiered at the recent Toronto Film Festival and Telluride Film Festival, is scheduled for nationwide release November 15.

 



The movis stars Christian Bale as British-born driving icon Ken Miles and Matt Damon as Carroll Shelby, the visionary car builder. They’re dispatched by Henry Ford II and Lee Iacocca, then an executive with Ford, with the mission of building the Ford GT40, a new car with the potential to finally defeat the perennially dominant Ferrari.

Shelby and Miles battle corporate interference, the laws of physics and their individual demons to build a revolutionary race car for Ford and challenge Ferrari at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1966.

During our podcast, Nagle discusses working with Damon and Bale and training the actors to a skill level above what they'll need to for the movie.

Nagle also discusses his long tenure in filmmaking and gives us behind-the-scenes insight into working with famous actors, the art of his craft and revisits his long career.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 27:59
#104, RV expert discusses the ever-changing industry https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/09/104-rv-expert-discusses-the-ever-changing-industry/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=104-rv-expert-discusses-the-ever-changing-industry Wed, 25 Sep 2019 00:26:15 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31910 Chuck Woodbury, publisher of RVTravel.com, is the preeminent expert in the ever-evolving recreational vehicle community. He's traveled throughout the United States and in several other countries, documenting his journeys via the RV lifestyle. With his website and electronic newsletters, Woodbury and his contributors provide the industry’s leading source of news and information. Chuck Woodbury, publisher of RVTravel.com, joins The Weekly Driver Podcast to discuss the ever-changing RV industry. Woodbury is also one of the few repeat guests on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia cover multiple components of the industry in episode #104. As we previously discussed, the RV industry offers many types of vehicles and various ways to experience a mobile lifestyle — as a getaway weekend or as part-time or permanent residence options. Woodbury is an advocate for the enjoyment of the RV world. But he's also a savvy watchdog of an industry ripe with major issues. Too many RV buyers are taken advantage of by RV manufacturers offering vehicles poorly constructed. Buyer recourse in the industry needs revision. Some financing programs benefit the sellers, not the buyers. Woodbury's website and his free comprehensive weekly newsletter and his five-times-per week travel tips newsletter are must reads for RV travelers and those considering it. Revisit our first interview with Woodbury about the RV industry from February 2018 in Episode # 25. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio Chuck Woodbury, publisher of RVTravel.com, is the preeminent expert in the ever-evolving recreational vehicle community. He's traveled throughout the United States and in several other countries, documenting his journeys via the RV lifestyle. -
With his website and electronic newsletters, Woodbury and his contributors provide the industry’s leading source of news and information.

Chuck Woodbury, publisher of RVTravel.com, joins The Weekly Driver Podcast to discuss the ever-changing RV industry.

Woodbury is also one of the few repeat guests on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia cover multiple components of the industry in episode #104.

As we previously discussed, the RV industry offers many types of vehicles and various ways to experience a mobile lifestyle — as a getaway weekend or as part-time or permanent residence options.

Woodbury is an advocate for the enjoyment of the RV world. But he's also a savvy watchdog of an industry ripe with major issues.

Too many RV buyers are taken advantage of by RV manufacturers offering vehicles poorly constructed. Buyer recourse in the industry needs revision. Some financing programs benefit the sellers, not the buyers.

Woodbury's website and his free comprehensive weekly newsletter and his five-times-per week travel tips newsletter are must reads for RV travelers and those considering it.

Revisit our first interview with Woodbury about the RV industry from February 2018 in Episode # 25.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 34:34
#103, On the mend for years, U.S. roads crumbling again https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/09/103-on-the-mend-for-years-u-s-roads-crumbling-again/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=103-on-the-mend-for-years-u-s-roads-crumbling-again Tue, 17 Sep 2019 01:30:40 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31905 Poor newspaper delivery, slow internet speed and increasing utility costs are constant public annoyances. But arguably at the top of the list of everyday frustrations is the worsening condition of roads. The Reason Foundation has been reporting on the issue for nearly a quarter-century. And in its recently released 24th Annual Highway Report, the libertarian think tank based in Los Angeles reports the nation's roads are deteriorating. U.S. roads crumbling again after years of improvement. Baruch Feigenbaum, lead author of the Annual Highway Report and assistant director of transportation at Reason Foundation, is our guest this week in an abbreviated edition of The Weekly Driver Podcast. We experienced technical difficulties in this episode, but podcast co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the new report with Feigenbaum. He explains the reasons for fluctuation in yearly results and how states react to the Reason Foundation's determinations. In the current report, North Dakota, Virginia, and Missouri have the best performing, most cost-efficient state highway systems. New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Hawaii have the worst. The 24th annual report is a definitively summarized: "After decades of incremental progress in several key highway categories, the Reason Foundation's Annual Highway Report published finds the nation’s highway conditions are deteriorating, especially in a group of problem-plagued states struggling to repair deficient bridges, maintain Interstate pavement and reduce urban traffic congestion." Feigenbaum, who has am eight-year tenure with the Reason Foundation, reports: "In looking at the nation's highway system as a whole, there was a decades-long trend of incremental improvement in some key categories, but the overall condition of the highway system has now worsened. "We see some improvement on structurally deficient bridges, but pavement conditions on rural and urban highways are declining, the rise in traffic fatalities is worrying, and we aren't making needed progress on traffic congestion in our major cities." The 24th Annual Highway Report, based on data that states submitted to the federal government, ranks each state’s highway system in 13 categories, including traffic fatalities, pavement condition, congestion, spending per mile and nd administrative costs, among other data. The new report uses state-submitted highway data from 2016. It's the most recent year with complete figures currently available. Traffic congestion and bridge data from 2017 is included in the report. North Dakota ranks first in overall performance and cost-effectiveness rankings of state highway systems for the second straight year. North Dakota’s rural and urban Interstate pavement conditions both rank in the top 10 and the state has kept its per-mile costs down. Virginia jumps an impressive 25 spots in the rankings—from 27th overall in the previous annual report—into second-place in performance and cost-effectiveness. Missouri, Maine and Kentucky round out the top five states. The state highway systems in New Jersey (50th), Alaska (49th), Rhode Island (48th), Hawaii (47th), Massachusetts (46th) and New York (45th) rank at the bottom of the nation in overall performance and cost-effectiveness. Despite spending more money per mile than any other state, New Jersey has the worst urban traffic congestion and among the worst urban Interstate pavement conditions in the country. The study finds pavement conditions on both urban Interstates and rural Interstates are deteriorating, with the percentage of urban Interstate mileage in poor condition increasing in 29 of 50 states. One-third, 33 percent, of the nation's urban Interstate mileage in poor condition is concentrated in just five states: California, Delaware, Hawaii, Louisiana, and New York. It’s not just urban Interstates with the rougher pavement, however, the Annual Highway Report also finds the percentage of rural arterial... Poor newspaper delivery, slow internet speed and increasing utility costs are constant public annoyances. But arguably at the top of the list of everyday frustrations is the worsening condition of roads. -
The Reason Foundation has been reporting on the issue for nearly a quarter-century. And in its recently released 24th Annual Highway Report, the libertarian think tank based in Los Angeles reports the nation's roads are deteriorating.

U.S. roads crumbling again after years of improvement.

Baruch Feigenbaum, lead author of the Annual Highway Report and assistant director of transportation at Reason Foundation, is our guest this week in an abbreviated edition of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

We experienced technical difficulties in this episode, but podcast co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the new report with Feigenbaum. He explains the reasons for fluctuation in yearly results and how states react to the Reason Foundation's determinations.

In the current report, North Dakota, Virginia, and Missouri have the best performing, most cost-efficient state highway systems. New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Hawaii have the worst.

The 24th annual report is a definitively summarized:

"After decades of incremental progress in several key highway categories, the Reason Foundation's Annual Highway Report published finds the nation’s highway conditions are deteriorating, especially in a group of problem-plagued states struggling to repair deficient bridges, maintain Interstate pavement and reduce urban traffic congestion."

Feigenbaum, who has am eight-year tenure with the Reason Foundation, reports:

"In looking at the nation's highway system as a whole, there was a decades-long trend of incremental improvement in some key categories, but the overall condition of the highway system has now worsened.

"We see some improvement on structurally deficient bridges, but pavement conditions on rural and urban highways are declining, the rise in traffic fatalities is worrying, and we aren't making needed progress on traffic congestion in our major cities."

The 24th Annual Highway Report, based on data that states submitted to the federal government, ranks each state’s highway system in 13 categories, including traffic fatalities, pavement condition, congestion, spending per mile and nd administrative costs, among other data.

The new report uses state-submitted highway data from 2016. It's the most recent year with complete figures currently available. Traffic congestion and bridge data from 2017 is included in the report.

North Dakota ranks first in overall performance and cost-effectiveness rankings of state highway systems for the second straight year. North Dakota’s rural and urban Interstate pavement conditions both rank in the top 10 and the state has kept its per-mile costs down. Virginia jumps an impressive 25 spots in the rankings—from 27th overall in the previous annual report—into second-place in performance and cost-effectiveness. Missouri, Maine and Kentucky round out the top five states.

The state highway systems in New Jersey (50th), Alaska (49th), Rhode Island (48th), Hawaii (47th), Massachusetts (46th) and New York (45th) rank at the bottom of the nation in overall performance and cost-effectiveness. Despite spending more money per mile than any other state, New Jersey has the worst urban traffic congestion and among the worst urban Interstate pavement conditions in the country.

The study finds pavement conditions on both urban Interstates and rural Interstates are deteriorating, with the percentage of urban Interstate mileage in poor condition increasing in 29 of 50 states...]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 8:54
#102, Sacramento renaissance man drives a 1961 Studebaker https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/09/102-sacramento-renaissance-man-drives-a-1961-studebaker/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=102-sacramento-renaissance-man-drives-a-1961-studebaker Fri, 06 Sep 2019 01:05:03 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31891 Dean Seavers has long appreciated vintage cars. He's owned several, a passion that continues a family heritage. Seavers' now-deceased father worked for General Motors in Fremont, California, and his son learned about mechanics and vehicle history at a young age. Seavers is also a renaissance man. He likes old stuff in his East Sacramento home. He appreciates craftsmanship from yesterday. Seavers' interests are represented ideally by his current favorite automobile — a 1961 Studebaker Lark VIII station wagon. He's owned the car for about three years and seemingly knows every inch of it. Dean Seavers of Sacramento owns a 1961 Studebaker Lark VIII. Image Courtesy of Dean Seavers. Seavers is our guest on Episode #102 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia talk with Seavers at a coffee shop near his downtown Sacramento workplace. Seavers, a procurement officer for the State of California, sometimes drives his Studebaker to work. But mostly it's a weekend car and he enjoys working participating in Studebaker clubs of like-minded folks. The Studebaker company, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in 1952, ceased automobile production in 1966. The Lark was made from 1959 to 1966. Studebaker and Packard were once aligned. Both companies independently and together made heavy vehicles with lots of chrome. The vehicles were simultaneously innovative and problematic. Studebaker owners are passionate about their cars as any vintage car enthusiasts. Seavers is no exception. Please join us in this episode, a lively discussion with Seavers. He talks about acquiring parts, working on his vehicle and his appreciation for Studebaker. It's a manufacturer he believes is largely under-appreciated. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio Dean Seavers has long appreciated vintage cars. He's owned several, a passion that continues a family heritage. Seavers' now-deceased father worked for General Motors in Fremont, California, and his son learned about mechanics and vehicle history at a ...
Seavers is also a renaissance man. He likes old stuff in his East Sacramento home. He appreciates craftsmanship from yesterday. Seavers' interests are represented ideally by his current favorite automobile — a 1961 Studebaker Lark VIII station wagon. He's owned the car for about three years and seemingly knows every inch of it.

Dean Seavers of Sacramento owns a 1961 Studebaker Lark VIII. Image Courtesy of Dean Seavers.

Seavers is our guest on Episode #102 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia talk with Seavers at a coffee shop near his downtown Sacramento workplace.

Seavers, a procurement officer for the State of California, sometimes drives his Studebaker to work. But mostly it's a weekend car and he enjoys working participating in Studebaker clubs of like-minded folks.

The Studebaker company, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in 1952, ceased automobile production in 1966. The Lark was made from 1959 to 1966. Studebaker and Packard were once aligned. Both companies independently and together made heavy vehicles with lots of chrome. The vehicles were simultaneously innovative and problematic.

Studebaker owners are passionate about their cars as any vintage car enthusiasts. Seavers is no exception.

Please join us in this episode, a lively discussion with Seavers. He talks about acquiring parts, working on his vehicle and his appreciation for Studebaker. It's a manufacturer he believes is largely under-appreciated.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 33:31
#101, Mark Aldrich has 33-year family affair with ’59 Metro https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/09/101-mark-aldrich-has-33-year-family-affair-with-59-metro/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=101-mark-aldrich-has-33-year-family-affair-with-59-metro Wed, 04 Sep 2019 02:16:18 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31878 Ferraris and Porsches are fine and define precision performance. Mark Aldrich appreciates those iconic cars as much as anyone. But the Aliso Viejo, California, lawyer's preferred vehicle is a 1959 Metro 1500. When high-end machines arrive at car shows with their distinctive growls, massive engines or flawless designs as mechanical works of art, Aldrich makes his entrance in a 60-year-old masterpiece. Attorney Mark Aldrich drives a 1959 Metro 1500 convertible. Image © James Raia/2019 Aldrich is our guest on Episode #101 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich (no relation) and James Raia discuss with Mark his nearly lifelong interest in Metropolitan, Nash, Rambler and all vehicles under the umbrella of the American Motors Corporation. I met Mark and his friend at the Concours on the Avenue, the early week gathering during Monterey Auto Week on Ocean Ave. (and many side streets) in Carmel. The 12th annual show, held in mid-August, is it is every year, featured the full spectrum of vintage cars and trucks. Surrounded by muscle cars, a massive military vehicle and monstrous sedans replete with protruding body parts and lots of chrome, the Metro may have looked out of place. But it wasn't, and it never is in other automotive events. "The car gets a lot of attention because it is unusual," said Aldrich. “We live near Laguna Beach where a Porsche doesn't get a second look. This car goes down the street and people look. My saying is 'Children laugh and dogs bark.' " Aldrich bought the Metropolitan 33 years ago for $3,000 and the extend the legacy of his family owning classic, simple American cars. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Ferraris and Porsches are fine and define precision performance. Mark Aldrich appreciates those iconic cars as much as anyone. But the Aliso Viejo, California, lawyer's preferred vehicle is a 1959 Metro 1500. -
When high-end machines arrive at car shows with their distinctive growls, massive engines or flawless designs as mechanical works of art, Aldrich makes his entrance in a 60-year-old masterpiece.

Attorney Mark Aldrich drives a 1959 Metro 1500 convertible. Image © James Raia/2019

Aldrich is our guest on Episode #101 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich (no relation) and James Raia discuss with Mark his nearly lifelong interest in Metropolitan, Nash, Rambler and all vehicles under the umbrella of the American Motors Corporation.

I met Mark and his friend at the Concours on the Avenue, the early week gathering during Monterey Auto Week on Ocean Ave. (and many side streets) in Carmel. The 12th annual show, held in mid-August, is it is every year, featured the full spectrum of vintage cars and trucks.

Surrounded by muscle cars, a massive military vehicle and monstrous sedans replete with protruding body parts and lots of chrome, the Metro may have looked out of place. But it wasn't, and it never is in other automotive events.

"The car gets a lot of attention because it is unusual," said Aldrich. “We live near Laguna Beach where a Porsche doesn't get a second look. This car goes down the street and people look. My saying is 'Children laugh and dogs bark.' "

Aldrich bought the Metropolitan 33 years ago for $3,000 and the extend the legacy of his family owning classic, simple American cars.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 28:47
#100, Artist Robert Carter rides, vividly paints the auto world https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/08/100-artist-robert-carter-rides-vividly-paints-the-auto-world/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=100-artist-robert-carter-rides-vividly-paints-the-auto-world Fri, 23 Aug 2019 01:41:30 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31861 As a young commercial artist, Robert Carter left England for a motorcycle adventure in the United States. He malfunctioned one day in Chico, California. It's now been the entrepreneur’s home and workplace for more than 45 years. A vintage car and motorcycle enthusiast, Carter owns Carter Artworks. He creates large, vivid paintings of famous cars and motorsports venues. He’s also a motorsports enthusiast with extensive knowledge of the machines he paints. Carter is our guest on Episode #100 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and I began the podcast nearly two years ago. We've covered a lot of miles with a diverse selection of guests. Artist Robert Carter of Carter Artworks in Chico, California, had some of his work displayed at Monterey Automobilia during Monterey Auto Week. Image © James Raia/2019 Carter is as enthusiastic as any of our interviewees. We talk with him about his automotive paintings, his passion for cars and motorcycles, fraud in the automotive memorabilia industry and his worldwide travels on bikes. Often creating 4x6-foot presentations in enamel, Carter works for museums and raceways, and he has pieces in well-known automotive auction houses. His works range from $5,000 to $20,000. But Carter's driving passion remains with motorcycles. He owns many and participates in rallies and riding adventures in far-flung countries. Carter's career in Chico began with contracts with agricultural companies to make fruit labels. But the demand for his specialty work waned after more than a decade. “I was still a motorcycle nut and still into cars,” Carter said recently during Automobilia Monterey, the three-day memorabilia expo during Classic Car Week. “One day, I just took a fruit truck label and instead of adding oranges, I put a Ferrari in there. “It looked so much better. That's how it got started. One painting I have is really the best canned tomato label you’ll ever see.” The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   As a young commercial artist, Robert Carter left England for a motorcycle adventure in the United States. He malfunctioned one day in Chico, California. It's now been the entrepreneur’s home and workplace for more than 45 years. -
A vintage car and motorcycle enthusiast, Carter owns Carter Artworks. He creates large, vivid paintings of famous cars and motorsports venues. He’s also a motorsports enthusiast with extensive knowledge of the machines he paints.

Carter is our guest on Episode #100 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and I began the podcast nearly two years ago. We've covered a lot of miles with a diverse selection of guests.

Artist Robert Carter of Carter Artworks in Chico, California, had some of his work displayed at Monterey Automobilia during Monterey Auto Week. Image © James Raia/2019

Carter is as enthusiastic as any of our interviewees. We talk with him about his automotive paintings, his passion for cars and motorcycles, fraud in the automotive memorabilia industry and his worldwide travels on bikes.

Often creating 4x6-foot presentations in enamel, Carter works for museums and raceways, and he has pieces in well-known automotive auction houses. His works range from $5,000 to $20,000.

But Carter's driving passion remains with motorcycles. He owns many and participates in rallies and riding adventures in far-flung countries.

Carter's career in Chico began with contracts with agricultural companies to make fruit labels. But the demand for his specialty work waned after more than a decade.

“I was still a motorcycle nut and still into cars,” Carter said recently during Automobilia Monterey, the three-day memorabilia expo during Classic Car Week. “One day, I just took a fruit truck label and instead of adding oranges, I put a Ferrari in there.

“It looked so much better. That's how it got started. One painting I have is really the best canned tomato label you’ll ever see.”

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 30:30
#99, Pacific Grove Auto Rally celebrates 25th anniversary https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/08/99-pacific-grove-auto-rally-celebrates-25th-anniversary/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=99-pacific-grove-auto-rally-celebrates-25th-anniversary Fri, 16 Aug 2019 00:24:21 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31833 The Pacific Grove Concours Auto Rally is among the most popular free-to-spectator events in the celebration of all things automotive during Monterey Auto Week. The trek through portions of the picturesque Monterey Peninsula is scheduled Friday, Aug. 16. It began in 1995 with automotive legend Caroll Shelby participating to help raise money for charity. The Pacific Grove Auto Rally is celebrating its 25ht anniversary. Image courtesy of Pacific Grove Chamber of Commerce. To celebrate the rally's 25th anniversary, the legendary Cobra (Shelby's creation) Cobra will be the marque for the parade of drivers and their classics, sports cars and vintage machines. David Laws, a key event organizer, is our guest on Episode #99 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Laws the history of the event and the iconic vehicles involved through the years. He also stress the importance of the event's charity mission with the Rotary Club of Pacific Grove's projects and local youth programs. As organizers state, "Even if you don’t own Cobra, join us to help celebrate our Silver Anniversary. Enjoy the show in historic downtown, followed by a coastal drive along scenic 17-Mile Drive through Pebble Beach." "On return to town, all are welcome to enjoy a barbecue dinner in Chautauqua Hall. Bring your family and friends to discover our great restaurants and fine shops." As per tradition, spectators are encouraged to witness the rally along the course. There may be a Cobra or two in the parade, but as Laws explains, participating vehicles are as varied as the automobile industry. Laws details how the rally is planned in cooperation with city officials and law enforcement jurisdictions. He recalls some of the unusual circumstances that have occurred during the rally's tenure. It's not too late to participate in the rally, observe the vehicles or help celebrate after the event in the community barbecue. Another option is to revisit the podcast as a reminder early next year and put the rally on your schedule for Monterey Auto Week 2020. For registration and the full schedule, visit: Pacific Grove Concours Auto Rally The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   The Pacific Grove Concours Auto Rally is among the most popular free-to-spectator events in the celebration of all things automotive during Monterey Auto Week. - The trek through portions of the picturesque Monterey Peninsula is scheduled Friday,
The trek through portions of the picturesque Monterey Peninsula is scheduled Friday, Aug. 16. It began in 1995 with automotive legend Caroll Shelby participating to help raise money for charity.

The Pacific Grove Auto Rally is celebrating its 25ht anniversary. Image courtesy of Pacific Grove Chamber of Commerce.

To celebrate the rally's 25th anniversary, the legendary Cobra (Shelby's creation) Cobra will be the marque for the parade of drivers and their classics, sports cars and vintage machines.

David Laws, a key event organizer, is our guest on Episode #99 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Laws the history of the event and the iconic vehicles involved through the years. He also stress the importance of the event's charity mission with the Rotary Club of Pacific Grove's projects and local youth programs.

As organizers state, "Even if you don’t own Cobra, join us to help celebrate our Silver Anniversary. Enjoy the show in historic downtown, followed by a coastal drive along scenic 17-Mile Drive through Pebble Beach."

"On return to town, all are welcome to enjoy a barbecue dinner in Chautauqua Hall. Bring your family and friends to discover our great restaurants and fine shops."

As per tradition, spectators are encouraged to witness the rally along the course. There may be a Cobra or two in the parade, but as Laws explains, participating vehicles are as varied as the automobile industry.

Laws details how the rally is planned in cooperation with city officials and law enforcement jurisdictions. He recalls some of the unusual circumstances that have occurred during the rally's tenure.

It's not too late to participate in the rally, observe the vehicles or help celebrate after the event in the community barbecue. Another option is to revisit the podcast as a reminder early next year and put the rally on your schedule for Monterey Auto Week 2020.

For registration and the full schedule, visit: Pacific Grove Concours Auto Rally

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 27:39
#98, Mary McGee shares her career as motorcycle icon https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/08/98-mary-mcgee-shares-her-career-as-motorcycle-icon/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=98-mary-mcgee-shares-her-career-as-motorcycle-icon Thu, 15 Aug 2019 06:29:47 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31830 Mary McGee has been busy lately. In July, she was a guest at the Superbike World Championships at WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca on the Monterey Peninsula. A few weeks later, McGee was a guest at The Sacramento Mile, the long-standing motorcycle event. McGee's presence at various events provides a chance for the public to recognize the pioneering race car and motorcycle driver now age 82. Inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame last November, Mary is our guest on episode #98 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Mary McGee in 1962 competed in the first motorcycle race held at Laguna Seca Raceway. Image © Bob Heathcote/WeatherTech Laguna Seca Rcaway. I had the opportunity to interview McGee during the Superbike World Championships. Bruce joined me when we interviewed Mary in the coffee shop at the DoubleTree in Sacramento the day before the Sacramento Mile. McGee arrived earlier in the day after a several-hour drive in her 17 1/2-year old Toyota Tundra from her home in Gardnerville, Nev., to Sacramento. During our wide-ranging podcast, the women's sports pioneer discussed the trials, tribulations and successes of her career. She stopped riding at age 77 because of severe arthritis in her hands. She talks with the energy of youth, walks with a purpose and remains fit. Mary grins and laughs often. She dons a healthy supply of curly white hair. Please join us for this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio Mary McGee has been busy lately. In July, she was a guest at the Superbike World Championships at WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca on the Monterey Peninsula. A few weeks later, McGee was a guest at The Sacramento Mile,
McGee's presence at various events provides a chance for the public to recognize the pioneering race car and motorcycle driver now age 82. Inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame last November, Mary is our guest on episode #98 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Mary McGee in 1962 competed in the first motorcycle race held at Laguna Seca Raceway. Image © Bob Heathcote/WeatherTech Laguna Seca Rcaway.

I had the opportunity to interview McGee during the Superbike World Championships. Bruce joined me when we interviewed Mary in the coffee shop at the DoubleTree in Sacramento the day before the Sacramento Mile.

McGee arrived earlier in the day after a several-hour drive in her 17 1/2-year old Toyota Tundra from her home in Gardnerville, Nev., to Sacramento.

During our wide-ranging podcast, the women's sports pioneer discussed the trials, tribulations and successes of her career. She stopped riding at age 77 because of severe arthritis in her hands. She talks with the energy of youth, walks with a purpose and remains fit. Mary grins and laughs often. She dons a healthy supply of curly white hair.

Please join us for this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 49:51
#97, Don Martine, Pacific Grove inn owner, MG museum curator https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/08/97-don-martine-pacific-grove-inn-owner-mg-museum-curator/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=97-don-martine-pacific-grove-inn-owner-mg-museum-curator Wed, 07 Aug 2019 22:45:56 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31791 It's unlikely anyone is more knowledgeable and as fond of their favorite carmaker than Don Martine is about MG. A guest staying at the Martine Inn in Pacific Grove, California who appreciates automobiles and nature gets two treats. Not only do they experience classic accommodations across the street from the Pacific Ocean, but the location also pays homage to the British manufacturer. Don Martine owns the Martine Inn in Pacific Grove. He's also a renowned MG expert and former race car driver who houses a museum for the British race cars on the property. Images © Bruce Aldrich/2019. The Inn is home to the proprietor's museum of MGs and memorabilia. From paintings on the Inn's walls to vintage automotive posters positioned around the property, all things MG are featured as is Martine's legacy as a driver, mechanic and historian. As Monterey Auto Week nears, Martine is our guest on Episode #97 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Martine guides podcast co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia throughout his Inn. He discusses his long history with MG. Martine's father owned a 1949 MGTC and the younger Martine also witnessed Johnny Von Neumann drive his 1950 MGTD Special to victory at the inaugural Pebble Beach Road Races. Martine raced and owned the Von Neuman Special for 30 years. While often not driving the fastest or most powerful vehicle, Martine won on racing strategy. He discusses his track savvy and relationships with drivers. The MG garage and cave-like and open-air displays areas at the Martine Inn include watercolor and oil paintings in automotive themes. Car-related auto posters, prints, photos, tools, signs and gas pumps are among other memorabilia. Martine also has a restoration shop near the Martine Inn where he joins friends and mechanics to restore vintage MGs and share their respective passion for little, prideful vintage cars. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   It's unlikely anyone is more knowledgeable and as fond of their favorite carmaker than Don Martine is about MG. - A guest staying at the Martine Inn in Pacific Grove, California who appreciates automobiles and nature gets two treats.
A guest staying at the Martine Inn in Pacific Grove, California who appreciates automobiles and nature gets two treats. Not only do they experience classic accommodations across the street from the Pacific Ocean, but the location also pays homage to the British manufacturer.

Don Martine owns the Martine Inn in Pacific Grove. He's also a renowned MG expert and former race car driver who houses a museum for the British race cars on the property. Images © Bruce Aldrich/2019.

The Inn is home to the proprietor's museum of MGs and memorabilia. From paintings on the Inn's walls to vintage automotive posters positioned around the property, all things MG are featured as is Martine's legacy as a driver, mechanic and historian.

As Monterey Auto Week nears, Martine is our guest on Episode #97 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Martine guides podcast co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia throughout his Inn. He discusses his long history with MG. Martine's father owned a 1949 MGTC and the younger Martine also witnessed Johnny Von Neumann drive his 1950 MGTD Special to victory at the inaugural Pebble Beach Road Races.

Martine raced and owned the Von Neuman Special for 30 years. While often not driving the fastest or most powerful vehicle, Martine won on racing strategy. He discusses his track savvy and relationships with drivers.

The MG garage and cave-like and open-air displays areas at the Martine Inn include watercolor and oil paintings in automotive themes. Car-related auto posters, prints, photos, tools, signs and gas pumps are among other memorabilia.

Martine also has a restoration shop near the Martine Inn where he joins friends and mechanics to restore vintage MGs and share their respective passion for little, prideful vintage cars.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 46:15
#96, Husband-wife turn personal vintage car fleet into rentals https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/07/96-husband-wife-turn-personal-vintage-car-fleet-into-rentals/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=96-husband-wife-turn-personal-vintage-car-fleet-into-rentals Tue, 30 Jul 2019 23:41:48 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31749 Erin Sollecito looks into the spacious warehouse and begins to talk about the vintage car fleet spread in front of her like they're part of a family. She's driven many of the vehicles rented by Monterey Touring Vehicles and knows their pedigrees. Sollecito, the company's vice president of business development, is our guest this week on The Weekly Driver Podcast. The episode is particularly timely since Monterey Auto Week, now nearly two weeks long, begins unofficially on Aug. 5 and ends on Aug. 18. A 1961 (23-window) Volkswagen Van is part of the vintage car fleet available for rent at Monterey Touring Vehicles. It's popular for children's birthday parties. All images © Bruce Aldrich/2019. Monterey Touring Vehicles is the creation of Heather and Rob Gardner, a husband-wife team who live in Carmel Valley. Rob Gardner is a physician; Heather is a research scientist. And they decided their private vintage car fleet is best served as a driveable museum of individual works of art. It's better known as a vintage car rental company. The Gardners don’t host a rally, auction or concours. But they could and they are involved with their vehicles as sponsors of various component of the gathering of all things automotive on the peninsula. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the varied vintage car fleet with Sollecito. Muscle cars to kit cars and classic convertibles to a more than 80-year-old Mercedes limousine fill the 10,000 square-foot showroom. We discuss the rental process, insurance to vehicles that may be added to the fleet and some in the current stable that may be sold. We also talk about what vehicles renters' favorites: a 1965 Shelby Cobra Tribute, 1965 Mustang GT (blue), 1961 VW 23-window Bus, 1965 Camaro SS (teal and white) or a 1957 Porsche Speedster Tribute? The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Erin Sollecito looks into the spacious warehouse and begins to talk about the vintage car fleet spread in front of her like they're part of a family. She's driven many of the vehicles rented by Monterey Touring Vehicles and knows their pedigrees. -
Sollecito, the company's vice president of business development, is our guest this week on The Weekly Driver Podcast. The episode is particularly timely since Monterey Auto Week, now nearly two weeks long, begins unofficially on Aug. 5 and ends on Aug. 18.

A 1961 (23-window) Volkswagen Van is part of the vintage car fleet available for rent at Monterey Touring Vehicles. It's popular for children's birthday parties. All images © Bruce Aldrich/2019.










Monterey Touring Vehicles is the creation of Heather and Rob Gardner, a husband-wife team who live in Carmel Valley. Rob Gardner is a physician; Heather is a research scientist. And they decided their private vintage car fleet is best served as a driveable museum of individual works of art. It's better known as a vintage car rental company.

The Gardners don’t host a rally, auction or concours. But they could and they are involved with their vehicles as sponsors of various component of the gathering of all things automotive on the peninsula.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the varied vintage car fleet with Sollecito. Muscle cars to kit cars and classic convertibles to a more than 80-year-old Mercedes limousine fill the 10,000 square-foot showroom. We discuss the rental process, insurance to vehicles that may be added to the fleet and some in the current stable that may be sold.

We also talk about what vehicles renters' favorites: a 1965 Shelby Cobra Tribute, 1965 Mustang GT (blue), 1961 VW 23-window Bus, 1965 Camaro SS (teal and white) or a 1957 Porsche Speedster Tribute?

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.
Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episodes are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 25:02
#95, Mecum Auctions defines fun during Monterey Auto Week https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/07/95-mecum-auctions-defines-fun-during-monterey-auto-week/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=95-mecum-auctions-defines-fun-during-monterey-auto-week Fri, 19 Jul 2019 21:46:39 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31740 Somewhere on the spectrum between the Concours d'LeMons and Concours d'Elegance, the three-day Mecum Auctions during Monterey Auto Week is perfectly positioned. Attainable daily drivers to rarities, it's an automotive whirlwind of buying and selling. The country's largest automotive auction, Mecum annually progresses to 13 stops around the country, January through December and Kissimmee, Fla. to Louisville, Ky., to Monterey. Its offerings include seven-figure works of art on wheels, family heirlooms, celebrity-owned cars, oddities and cars of infamous pedigree. A 1954/1959 Ferrari 0432M from the collection of Dana Patti Mecum will be auctioned during Mecum Auctions' three-day auction during Monterey Auto Week. Image courtesy of Mecum Auctions. "I call it a car show with a pulse," said John Kraman, Mecum's long-time director of consignments and a television commentator's during the auction's extensive television broadcasts on NBCSN. "I think that's accurate." Kraman is our guest on episode #95 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Kraman, the mix of cars and motorcycles included in this year's event. The Mecum Auction in Monterey, scheduled Aug. 14-16, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency and Old Del Monte Golf Course in Monterey, California, has some of both extremes and everything between. "We all go to car shows, and it's great," said Kraman. "But there's something a little bit extra, a little magic about the cars moving on the runway, the grumbling and the auction environment itself." Mecum's Auction, the only daytime auction during Monterey Auto Week, is expected to sell about 600 vehicles during its three-day run. Thursday, as Kraman relates, is an open day. A 1968 Oldsmobile worth $15,000 is more than welcome. "We like entry-level, normal traditional Mecum customers, seeking affordable cars," Kraman said. Friday and Saturday auctions are "catalog days" featuring vehicles are with reserve pricing set at least $50,000. The catalog days are closed for sellers; the Thursday auction remains open for sellers. "Come out, buy or sell a car or spectate; it doesn't matter," said Kraman. "We invite everybody and then give them time to do other things in the evening." In recent years, Mecum Auctions' selling trends in Monterey have included vintage pickups, muscle cars and certain varieties of Volkswagen vans. This year, the emphasis will be on individuals' collections. "We are dependent on what consigners want to bring to our auction," said Kraman. "It's not like we pick and choose what we want to come to our auction. This year, it's collections. "We have nine separate collections from some of the top collectors. We're talking, pre-war classics to modern exotics. An eclectic mix of collections is going to be the headline news." Dana Mecum, the company founder, and his wife Patti are selling vehicles from their private collection including a 1954/1959 Ferrari 0432 and a 1965 Shelby 289 Cobra CSX2588. The latter was the last of its kind sold to the public. Mecum Auctions also has a second-chance auction. It's called "bid goes on." It comprises about 10 percent of vehicle sales. "Your best opportunity to get it sold is still while the vehicle is up on the red carpet," Kraman said. "That's our business model. But four full-timers are working in the bid-goes-on process. We will try to get a deal that way for about 50-60 cars." Mecum Auctions' haul of cars and motorcycles in this year's event and well as schedule details and television broadcast times are available on www.mecum.com. Tickets are $20 in advance, $30 at the auction. Somewhere on the spectrum between the Concours d'LeMons and Concours d'Elegance, the three-day Mecum Auctions during Monterey Auto Week is perfectly positioned. Attainable daily drivers to rarities, it's an automotive whirlwind of buying and selling.
The country's largest automotive auction, Mecum annually progresses to 13 stops around the country, January through December and Kissimmee, Fla. to Louisville, Ky., to Monterey. Its offerings include seven-figure works of art on wheels, family heirlooms, celebrity-owned cars, oddities and cars of infamous pedigree.

A 1954/1959 Ferrari 0432M from the collection of Dana Patti Mecum will be auctioned during Mecum Auctions' three-day auction during Monterey Auto Week. Image courtesy of Mecum Auctions.

"I call it a car show with a pulse," said John Kraman, Mecum's long-time director of consignments and a television commentator's during the auction's extensive television broadcasts on NBCSN. "I think that's accurate."

Kraman is our guest on episode #95 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Kraman, the mix of cars and motorcycles included in this year's event.

The Mecum Auction in Monterey, scheduled Aug. 14-16, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency and Old Del Monte Golf Course in Monterey, California, has some of both extremes and everything between.

"We all go to car shows, and it's great," said Kraman. "But there's something a little bit extra, a little magic about the cars moving on the runway, the grumbling and the auction environment itself."

Mecum's Auction, the only daytime auction during Monterey Auto Week, is expected to sell about 600 vehicles during its three-day run. Thursday, as Kraman relates, is an open day. A 1968 Oldsmobile worth $15,000 is more than welcome.

"We like entry-level, normal traditional Mecum customers, seeking affordable cars," Kraman said.

Friday and Saturday auctions are "catalog days" featuring vehicles are with reserve pricing set at least $50,000. The catalog days are closed for sellers; the Thursday auction remains open for sellers.

"Come out, buy or sell a car or spectate; it doesn't matter," said Kraman. "We invite everybody and then give them time to do other things in the evening."

In recent years, Mecum Auctions' selling trends in Monterey have included vintage pickups, muscle cars and certain varieties of Volkswagen vans. This year, the emphasis will be on individuals' collections.

"We are dependent on what consigners want to bring to our auction," said Kraman. "It's not like we pick and choose what we want to come to our auction. This year, it's collections.

"We have nine separate collections from some of the top collectors. We're talking, pre-war classics to modern exotics. An eclectic mix of collections is going to be the headline news."

Dana Mecum, the company founder, and his wife Patti are selling vehicles from their private collection including a 1954/1959 Ferrari 0432 and a 1965 Shelby 289 Cobra CSX2588. The latter was the last of its kind sold to the public.

Mecum Auctions also has a second-chance auction. It's called "bid goes on." It comprises about 10 percent of vehicle sales.

"Your best opportunity to get it sold is still while the vehicle is up on the red carpet," Kraman said. "That's our business model. But four full-timers are working in the bid-goes-on process. We will try to get a deal that way for about 50-60 cars."

Mecum Auctions' haul of cars and motorcycles in this year's event and well as schedule details and television broadcast times are available on www.mecum.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 29:44
#94, West Sacramento truck company helps Paradise Fire cleanup https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/07/94-west-sacramento-truck-company-helps-paradise-fire-cleanup/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=94-west-sacramento-truck-company-helps-paradise-fire-cleanup Sun, 14 Jul 2019 20:52:18 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31689 Not too long ago, I overheard a conversation in a Starbucks in Sacramento. The barista asked the woman in front of me what she does for a living. The response: "My husband and I own a dump truck." It turns out, the Maricela and Adam Fry, husband and wife, own Big Country Restoration and Transport in West Sacramento. They own three massive dump trucks and have one of many contracts to help the cleanup of The Camp Fire in Paradise, California. Adam Fry and his crew from Big Country Restoration and Transport in West Sacramento are part of the massive cleanup project from the devastating Paradise Fire last November. Images courtesy of Adam Fry. Adam Fry is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Drive Podcast. The fire started in Paradise on Nov. 9 2018 and was the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history. It was also the deadliest wildfire in the United States since the Cloquet fire in 1918. The fire covered 153,336 acres. More than 18,000 buildings were destroyed and at least 85 people died. Fry discusses with co-hosts James Raia and Bruce Aldrich what his crews are doing in the cleanup. He repeatedly states the top priority of the project is safety. He also discusses at length the stress the workers on hundreds of trucks have endured. He talks openly about companies on the project that have not adhered to rules. Although it's been about eight months since the fire, Paradise remains a disaster area. Fry notes phase 1 of the cleanup and restoration may be complete in October. He talks about animal remains his crews have discovered and how the aftermath of the tragedy remains raw and complicated. Please join us for a fascinating episode. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher iheartradio   Not too long ago, I overheard a conversation in a Starbucks in Sacramento. The barista asked the woman in front of me what she does for a living. The response: "My husband and I own a dump truck." - It turns out, the Maricela and Adam Fry,
It turns out, the Maricela and Adam Fry, husband and wife, own Big Country Restoration and Transport in West Sacramento. They own three massive dump trucks and have one of many contracts to help the cleanup of The Camp Fire in Paradise, California.

Adam Fry and his crew from Big Country Restoration and Transport in West Sacramento are part of the massive cleanup project from the devastating Paradise Fire last November. Images courtesy of Adam Fry.







Adam Fry is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Drive Podcast. The fire started in Paradise on Nov. 9 2018 and was the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history.

It was also the deadliest wildfire in the United States since the Cloquet fire in 1918. The fire covered 153,336 acres. More than 18,000 buildings were destroyed and at least 85 people died.

Fry discusses with co-hosts James Raia and Bruce Aldrich what his crews are doing in the cleanup. He repeatedly states the top priority of the project is safety. He also discusses at length the stress the workers on hundreds of trucks have endured. He talks openly about companies on the project that have not adhered to rules.

Although it's been about eight months since the fire, Paradise remains a disaster area. Fry notes phase 1 of the cleanup and restoration may be complete in October. He talks about animal remains his crews have discovered and how the aftermath of the tragedy remains raw and complicated.

Please join us for a fascinating episode.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.
All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
iheartradio

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 23:13
#92, Vintage firetruck converted into Ohio mobile pub https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/07/92-vintage-firetruck-converted-into-ohio-mobile-pub/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=92-vintage-firetruck-converted-into-ohio-mobile-pub Mon, 01 Jul 2019 22:33:02 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31464   Kevin Mullan is an easy guy to like, particularly if you appreciate beer, vintage firetrucks and the entrepreneurial spirit. Mullan owns a 1987 E-One pumper first E-One pumper firetruck converted into a mobile brewpub. Mullan, 38, of Toledo, Ohio, purchased the truck, had a walk-in cooler with 10 beer taps installed,  and named the business-on- wheels Ladder 419 beer truck. The name is a nod to the city's area code. Kevin Mullan has converted a vintage firetruck into a mobile pub. As co-hosts of The Weekly Driver Podcast, Bruce Aldrich and I are now bonafide members of the Mullan's fan club. He's our guest on Episode #92 of our weekly discussion of all things automotive. The beer truck, which debuted in late June in Blissfield, Michigan, is unique. Its walk-in cooler was installed after the 1,500-gallon water tank was removed. There's room for onboard C02 and a capacity for 15 kegs. Beer seems like the best choice. But the taps can be used for wine, soft drinks or coffee. During the podcast, Mullan details his ownership trials, tribulations, alcohol licensing, experiences with the new business and the vast potential for his mobile beverage operation. The firetruck, Mullan explains, was purchased at a surprisingly reasonable price in Leonidas Township in Michigan. It looks, according to its new owner, like what might be expected — an old firetruck. Levers and hookups are still intact, as are the words "Emergency 911." Rental for Ladder 419 is $450 for four hours. Additional details are available on the company's website, www.tapped419.com The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners and viewers. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. Please also consider reposting the links from the podcast episodes to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is now also available on iHeart Radio. SPONSOR THANKS  The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.     Kevin Mullan is an easy guy to like, particularly if you appreciate beer, vintage firetrucks and the entrepreneurial spirit. Mullan owns a 1987 E-One pumper first E-One pumper firetruck converted into a mobile brewpub. Mullan, 38, of Toledo, Ohio, Kevin Mullan is an easy guy to like, particularly if you appreciate beer, vintage firetrucks and the entrepreneurial spirit. Mullan owns a 1987 E-One pumper first E-One pumper firetruck converted into a mobile brewpub.
Mullan, 38, of Toledo, Ohio, purchased the truck, had a walk-in cooler with 10 beer taps installed,  and named the business-on- wheels Ladder 419 beer truck. The name is a nod to the city's area code.


Kevin Mullan has converted a vintage firetruck into a mobile pub.









As co-hosts of The Weekly Driver Podcast, Bruce Aldrich and I are now bonafide members of the Mullan's fan club. He's our guest on Episode #92 of our weekly discussion of all things automotive.
The beer truck, which debuted in late June in Blissfield, Michigan, is unique. Its walk-in cooler was installed after the 1,500-gallon water tank was removed. There's room for onboard C02 and a capacity for 15 kegs. Beer seems like the best choice. But the taps can be used for wine, soft drinks or coffee.
During the podcast, Mullan details his ownership trials, tribulations, alcohol licensing, experiences with the new business and the vast potential for his mobile beverage operation.
The firetruck, Mullan explains, was purchased at a surprisingly reasonable price in Leonidas Township in Michigan. It looks, according to its new owner, like what might be expected — an old firetruck. Levers and hookups are still intact, as are the words "Emergency 911."
Rental for Ladder 419 is $450 for four hours. Additional details are available on the company's website, www.tapped419.com
The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners and viewers. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. Please also consider reposting the links from the podcast episodes to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play

iTunes

Spotify

Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is now also available on iHeart Radio.

SPONSOR THANKS 

]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 37:53
#91, Sacramento vintage car collector Andy Harris https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/06/91-sacramento-vintage-car-collector-andy-harris/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=91-sacramento-vintage-car-collector-andy-harris Mon, 24 Jun 2019 19:02:15 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31327 Andy Harris lives and works in Sacramento, California. He's owned United Attorneys' Services for many years, and he shares two of the same pastimes as the co-hosts of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Harris is a veteran long-distance runner and he's a vintage car collector. Harris is our guest on Episode #91 of our weekly conversations about all things in the automotive industry. Bruce Aldrich and James Raia host another episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Harris the particulars of the four vastly different cars he owns. How about a 1959 Crown Imperial? Or consider Harris' 1973 Citroen SM or his 1991 Mazda Miata. And for a daily driver, how about Harris'choice of a 2013 Fiat 500 Abarth? While all of his cars attract attention, the behemoth Chrysler Crown Imperial gets the largest share of onlookers and curiosity seekers. "Even if you're just going to get a tank of gas, you had better not be in a hurry," says Harris of the vehicle he inherited from his grandmother. "The Imperial is 19 1/2 feet long and 7 1/2-feet wide. It's spent its entire life in Sacramento. People who are in their 70s and 80s will walk up and know the car. I have to open the hood. It's a conversation piece. I always get surrounded." The recently 1973 Citroen SM is Harris' fourth Citroen. With its 6-cylinder 3.0-liter, 185-horsepower engine, the Citroen SM is among the most polarizing cars of its time. "You either think they look hideous or you think they're the most beautiful car you've ever seen," Harris says. "They're really polarizing. I really love the car. I am a lover of all things quirky and unusual and nothing is more unusual and quirkier than a Citroen? Harris also owns a 1991 Mazda Miata and a 2013 Fiat 500 Abarth. Being a vintage car collector has sspecific requirement. We discuss with Harris his cars' legacies — maintenance to insurance, history to the overall enjoyment of driving vintage cars. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Andy Harris lives and works in Sacramento, California. He's owned United Attorneys' Services for many years, and he shares two of the same pastimes as the co-hosts of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Harris is a veteran long-distance runner and he's a vintag...
Harris is our guest on Episode #91 of our weekly conversations about all things in the automotive industry.

Bruce Aldrich and James Raia host another episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Harris the particulars of the four vastly different cars he owns. How about a 1959 Crown Imperial? Or consider Harris' 1973 Citroen SM or his 1991 Mazda Miata. And for a daily driver, how about Harris'choice of a 2013 Fiat 500 Abarth?

While all of his cars attract attention, the behemoth Chrysler Crown Imperial gets the largest share of onlookers and curiosity seekers.

"Even if you're just going to get a tank of gas, you had better not be in a hurry," says Harris of the vehicle he inherited from his grandmother. "The Imperial is 19 1/2 feet long and 7 1/2-feet wide. It's spent its entire life in Sacramento. People who are in their 70s and 80s will walk up and know the car. I have to open the hood. It's a conversation piece. I always get surrounded."

The recently 1973 Citroen SM is Harris' fourth Citroen. With its 6-cylinder 3.0-liter, 185-horsepower engine, the Citroen SM is among the most polarizing cars of its time.

"You either think they look hideous or you think they're the most beautiful car you've ever seen," Harris says. "They're really polarizing. I really love the car. I am a lover of all things quirky and unusual and nothing is more unusual and quirkier than a Citroen?

Harris also owns a 1991 Mazda Miata and a 2013 Fiat 500 Abarth.

Being a vintage car collector has sspecific requirement. We discuss with Harris his cars' legacies — maintenance to insurance, history to the overall enjoyment of driving vintage cars.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast
Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 37:33
#90 The Weekly Driver podcast gets USA Today car karma https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/06/90-the-weekly-driver-podcast-gets-usa-today-car-karma/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=90-the-weekly-driver-podcast-gets-usa-today-car-karma Fri, 21 Jun 2019 17:52:23 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31271 USA Today has 10 Best lists, including several in the automotive field. The Weekly Driver and the site's podcast was contacted by the newspaper to give my opinion in four categories — car show, NASCAR track, motorsports, favorite experience — for a contest. I hadn't thought about the topics much, but it’s one of several areas, Bruce Aldrich and I discuss during episode No. 90 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Bruce Aldrich and James Raia host another episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. My choices in the various areas included: The Los Angeles Auto Show, Monterey Auto Week and Pacific Coast Dream Machines among auto shows as well as watching MotoGP and reviewing two Bentleys. Bruce had similar answers but also cited Daytona Motor Speedway and Talladega Superspeedway. While I was on assignment, Bruce hosts the show from our base in Sacramento. I contribute from Pebble Beach, California, during a break from reporting on the recent U.S. Open golf tournament. Additionally, Bruce and I discuss the recently announced innovation from Rivian, the pending all-electric sport utility vehicle and pickup. Its latest innovation is vehicle-to-vehicle recharging and auxiliary battery packs. Both ideas are among the manufacturer's marketing initiatives while the much-touted vehicles are still pending. And Bruce and I also discuss a few other trends in the automotive industry. The Weekly Driver podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support us by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. USA Today has 10 Best lists, including several in the automotive field. The Weekly Driver and the site's podcast was contacted by the newspaper to give my opinion in four categories — car show, NASCAR track, motorsports, I hadn't thought about the topics much, but it’s one of several areas, Bruce Aldrich and I discuss during episode No. 90 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.


Bruce Aldrich and James Raia host another episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.
My choices in the various areas included: The Los Angeles Auto Show, Monterey Auto Week and Pacific Coast Dream Machines among auto shows as well as watching MotoGP and reviewing two Bentleys. Bruce had similar answers but also cited Daytona Motor Speedway and Talladega Superspeedway.
While I was on assignment, Bruce hosts the show from our base in Sacramento. I contribute from Pebble Beach, California, during a break from reporting on the recent U.S. Open golf tournament.
Additionally, Bruce and I discuss the recently announced innovation from Rivian, the pending all-electric sport utility vehicle and pickup. Its latest innovation is vehicle-to-vehicle recharging and auxiliary battery packs. Both ideas are among the manufacturer's marketing initiatives while the much-touted vehicles are still pending.
And Bruce and I also discuss a few other trends in the automotive industry.
The Weekly Driver podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.
Support us by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play

iTunes

Spotify

Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 28:41
#88, Moving a space shuttle, other big stuff on roads https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/06/88-moving-a-space-shuttle-other-big-stuff-on-roads/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=88-moving-a-space-shuttle-other-big-stuff-on-roads Thu, 06 Jun 2019 00:03:30 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31196 If you want to transport the Endeavor Space Shuttle or a similarly large object, there's a good chance Commercial Truck Trader will be involved. The Virginia-based company rents vehicles of all shapes and sizes, particularly when the task involves moving something on the road that requires special needs. Moving The Endeavor Space Shuttle was challenge met by Commercial Truck and Equipment Trader. Amanda Ayala, vice president Commercial Truck & Equipment Trader, is our guest in Episode 88 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview Ayala and examine what's involved moving the famous shuttle. It's only 12 miles from the Los Angles International Airport to the California Science Center. But as Ayala explained, the move required the uses of six freeway lanes. The moving crew was also required to trim trees as the move progressed. Ayala, whose father owned a trucking company, provides insight into how Commercial Truck Trader makes recommendations to companies for their moving needs. In addition to the Endeavor, Commercial Truck Trader has been involved in transporting projects from moving 340-ton boulders to wind turbine blades and a power station transformer to a custom-built trailer with 192 wheels. Ayala fills us in on all of the details of the company's massive projects in a wide-ranging episode. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. If you want to transport the Endeavor Space Shuttle or a similarly large object, there's a good chance Commercial Truck Trader will be involved. - The Virginia-based company rents vehicles of all shapes and sizes,
The Virginia-based company rents vehicles of all shapes and sizes, particularly when the task involves moving something on the road that requires special needs.

Moving The Endeavor Space Shuttle was challenge met by Commercial Truck and Equipment Trader.

Amanda Ayala, vice president Commercial Truck & Equipment Trader, is our guest in Episode 88 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview Ayala and examine what's involved moving the famous shuttle.

It's only 12 miles from the Los Angles International Airport to the California Science Center. But as Ayala explained, the move required the uses of six freeway lanes. The moving crew was also required to trim trees as the move progressed.

Ayala, whose father owned a trucking company, provides insight into how Commercial Truck Trader makes recommendations to companies for their moving needs.

In addition to the Endeavor, Commercial Truck Trader has been involved in transporting projects from moving 340-ton boulders to wind turbine blades and a power station transformer to a custom-built trailer with 192 wheels.

Ayala fills us in on all of the details of the company's massive projects in a wide-ranging episode.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 24:08
Episode 87, Cars, bikes mix in cycling caravan https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/05/episode-87-cars-bikes-mix-in-cycling-caravan/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-87-cars-bikes-mix-in-cycling-caravan Fri, 17 May 2019 22:22:43 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31160 For every cyclist competing in a professional bike race, there's seemingly a corresponding vehicle. But it's not an exact parallel. In fact, in top-level races, there are several times more team, organization, media and sponsor vehicles, equipment trucks, fans' motorhomes and police cars and motorcycles than competitors. Like the cyclists, race vehicles get down time at hotels, but otherwise, they're all almost always on the move, climbing mountains, negotiating narrow roads and descending at top speeds. The USA Cycling National Team has a new relationship with Volvo during the 2019 Amgen Tour of California. Its team cars during the 14th annual event are 2019 Volvo V60s. All images © James Raia/2019. Volvo saw an opportunity at this year's event and provided three V60 AWD T6 Inscription trim wagons for the seven-rider team. Team managers Michael Sayers and Michael Creed are driving the cars during every stage. Scott Schnitzspahn, USA Cycling's vice president of Elite Athletics, has often piloted the third vehicle. Several European manufacturers, including Fiat, Citroën, Peugeot and Renault, have also had partnerships with the Tour de France and other international cycling events. All of the vehicles' drivers enthusiastically praised the Volvo V60s as ideal vehicles in bike racing caravans but simultaneously as luxury wagons. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and I discuss the Volvo and my vehicle during the 14th annual event, a 2019 Volkswagen GLI, in Episode #87 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. I've driven from start to finish during the race's editions, this year from Sacramento to South Lake Tahoe and then on a North to South route toward the finish in Pasadena on May 18. I've driven about 900 miles so far in the Jetta GLI, and it has performed admirably as a four-door sedan with a sports car persona. For example, it's rated at 32 mph on the freeway. I've averaged 35.6 mpg. Bruce, who hosts the episode from Sacramento, and I also talk about the history of vehicles in the Tour de France. I'm reporting from during a morning break before continuing to the end of stage 4 in Morro Bay, California. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify  Stitcher  The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.   For every cyclist competing in a professional bike race, there's seemingly a corresponding vehicle. But it's not an exact parallel. In fact, in top-level races, there are several times more team, organization, media and sponsor vehicles,
Like the cyclists, race vehicles get down time at hotels, but otherwise, they're all almost always on the move, climbing mountains, negotiating narrow roads and descending at top speeds.

The USA Cycling National Team has a new relationship with Volvo during the 2019 Amgen Tour of California. Its team cars during the 14th annual event are 2019 Volvo V60s. All images © James Raia/2019.








Volvo saw an opportunity at this year's event and provided three V60 AWD T6 Inscription trim wagons for the seven-rider team. Team managers Michael Sayers and Michael Creed are driving the cars during every stage.

Scott Schnitzspahn, USA Cycling's vice president of Elite Athletics, has often piloted the third vehicle. Several European manufacturers, including Fiat, Citroën, Peugeot and Renault, have also had partnerships with the Tour de France and other international cycling events.

All of the vehicles' drivers enthusiastically praised the Volvo V60s as ideal vehicles in bike racing caravans but simultaneously as luxury wagons.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and I discuss the Volvo and my vehicle during the 14th annual event, a 2019 Volkswagen GLI, in Episode #87 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

I've driven from start to finish during the race's editions, this year from Sacramento to South Lake Tahoe and then on a North to South route toward the finish in Pasadena on May 18.

I've driven about 900 miles so far in the Jetta GLI, and it has performed admirably as a four-door sedan with a sports car persona. For example, it's rated at 32 mph on the freeway. I've averaged 35.6 mpg.

Bruce, who hosts the episode from Sacramento, and I also talk about the history of vehicles in the Tour de France. I'm reporting from during a morning break before continuing to the end of stage 4 in Morro Bay, California.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play

iTunes

Spotify

 Stitcher 

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.  ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 32:38
#85, Donald Farr debuts new book, BOSS Mustang: 50 Years https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/05/85-donald-farr-debuts-new-book-boss-mustang-50-years/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=85-donald-farr-debuts-new-book-boss-mustang-50-years Thu, 09 May 2019 06:08:07 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31125 Historian Donald Farr likely doesn't have many equals when the topic has anything to do with the Ford Mustang. But he doesn't see it that way, and he's too humble. He cites others as all-knowing experts when the topic is the famous sports car. Farr, a Mustang owner, journalist and author, is our guest on Episode #85 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Farr his new book "BOSS Mustang: 50 Years." Donald Farr has written a new book about the iconic edition of the BOSS Mustang on its 50rh anniversary. The book includes the complete history of the most iconic pony car ever made. It details racing and street histories of the 302 and 429 models. Photography and interviews feature BOSS Mustang designers, engineers and racers and provide a comprehensive study of the powerful machine. Farr also discusses his family history with car brand and his enduring passion for the legendary car and how it influenced the launch of several now also iconic sports cars. He also details the Mustang's successes and failures in Trans-Am racing. He writes the firsthand accounts from the people who created the original Boss, as well as the team that resurrected Ford’s most iconic Mustang. Mustang owners as passionate as car enthusiasts. Farr, a Mustang owner since 1970 and the current editor of Mustang Monthly exemplifies the consummate enthusiast. It's clearly evident in our interview with the author, and it should be. Farr has been writing about the famous vehicle for more than 30 years. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episode are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Historian Donald Farr likely doesn't have many equals when the topic has anything to do with the Ford Mustang. But he doesn't see it that way, and he's too humble. He cites others as all-knowing experts when the topic is the famous sports car. - Ford Mustang. But he doesn't see it that way, and he's too humble. He cites others as all-knowing experts when the topic is the famous sports car.

Farr, a Mustang owner, journalist and author, is our guest on Episode #85 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Farr his new book "BOSS Mustang: 50 Years."

Donald Farr has written a new book about the iconic edition of the BOSS Mustang on its 50rh anniversary.

The book includes the complete history of the most iconic pony car ever made. It details racing and street histories of the 302 and 429 models. Photography and interviews feature BOSS Mustang designers, engineers and racers and provide a comprehensive study of the powerful machine.

Farr also discusses his family history with car brand and his enduring passion for the legendary car and how it influenced the launch of several now also iconic sports cars. He also details the Mustang's successes and failures in Trans-Am racing. He writes the firsthand accounts from the people who created the original Boss, as well as the team that resurrected Ford’s most iconic Mustang.

Mustang owners as passionate as car enthusiasts. Farr, a Mustang owner since 1970 and the current editor of Mustang Monthly exemplifies the consummate enthusiast. It's clearly evident in our interview with the author, and it should be. Farr has been writing about the famous vehicle for more than 30 years.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All podcast episode are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play

iTunes

Spotify

Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 31:43
#84, David Ankin, ToyMakerz hit season 3 finale https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/04/84-david-ankin-toymakerz-hit-season-3-finale/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=84-david-ankin-toymakerz-hit-season-3-finale Thu, 25 Apr 2019 21:21:03 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31104 The  finale of Season 3 of ToyMakerz, the increasingly popular automotive reality television program  hosted by David Ankin, will be broadcast on April 28. It will feature a guest appearance by Dean Cain, the actor who portrayed Superman/Clark Kent on the television series Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman. Ankin is a repeat guest on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia, talk in Episode #84 with Ankin about his three years on the show and his plans for future seasons. We also discuss his friendship with Cain, the veteran movie actor. David Ankin (center) and his colleagues from the automotive reality show, ToyMakerz. The final episode's challenge is building a "completely out-of-the-box, over-the-top" exhibition car based on a 1941 Willys Coupe. The customized vehicle is described as being able to "make tracks like no other car." Cain arrives for a visit as do the show's top 3, "Show Us Your Ride" finalists. ToyMakerz is broadcast on the HISTORY Channel and FYI, in partnership with A+E Networks. The last episode of the show's third season will lead into the rerun season, with the series featuring Ankin's wild creations repeated often. The episodes are also available via social media. Ankin's boundless energy is a highlight of the series, and he spoke with the same enthusiasm about the pending Season 4. He couldn't reveal many details, but he shared one of his upcoming creations will be unlike anything anyone has ever seen. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on  www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Here's the link to our first interview with ToyMakerz from February. Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher  The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. The  finale of Season 3 of ToyMakerz, the increasingly popular automotive reality television program  hosted by David Ankin, will be broadcast on April 28. It will feature a guest appearance by Dean Cain, the actor who portrayed Superman/Clark Kent on ...
Ankin is a repeat guest on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia, talk in Episode #84 with Ankin about his three years on the show and his plans for future seasons. We also discuss his friendship with Cain, the veteran movie actor.

David Ankin (center) and his colleagues from the automotive reality show, ToyMakerz.

The final episode's challenge is building a "completely out-of-the-box, over-the-top" exhibition car based on a 1941 Willys Coupe. The customized vehicle is described as being able to "make tracks like no other car."

Cain arrives for a visit as do the show's top 3, "Show Us Your Ride" finalists.

ToyMakerz is broadcast on the HISTORY Channel and FYI, in partnership with A+E Networks.

The last episode of the show's third season will lead into the rerun season, with the series featuring Ankin's wild creations repeated often. The episodes are also available via social media.

Ankin's boundless energy is a highlight of the series, and he spoke with the same enthusiasm about the pending Season 4. He couldn't reveal many details, but he shared one of his upcoming creations will be unlike anything anyone has ever seen.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on  www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Here's the link to our first interview with ToyMakerz from February.

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play

iTunes

Spotify

Stitcher 

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 24:40
#83 GIG one-way rental car debuts in Sacramento https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/04/83-gig-one-way-rental-car-debuts-in-sacramento/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=83-gig-one-way-rental-car-debuts-in-sacramento Tue, 23 Apr 2019 20:11:37 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31081 Tony Bizjak, the long-time transportation writer for the Sacramento Bee, recently wrote an article and was the driver in the publication's online video about GIG. It's the new on-demand, one-way rental car service available in Sacramento and other select cities. Bizjak is the first of our two guests on Episode #83 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Our second guest is Mike Blasky, the Media Relations Specialist of AAA for Northern California, Nevada and Utah. He's based in Walnut Creek, California. GIG, the one-way car rental service, recently made its Sacramento debut. GIG (Get In, Go) is working in conjunction with AAA on the project. GIG relies on the Toyota Prius hybrids in San Francisco Bay Area, but the Sacramento region is using all-electric Chevrolet Bolts. An estimated 260 Bolts will be positioned around Sacramento's main neighborhoods and central district of the city by the end of April Bizjak shares his experience using the GIG app to find the closest vehicle and then takes it for a drive. He also explains the different options of rental time frames and their corresponding payments. Sacramento is the first city selected by Electrify America for its investment in electric vehicle usage. Blasky explains AAA's involvement in GIG, details of the program, how the public has reacted to the project. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher  The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Tony Bizjak, the long-time transportation writer for the Sacramento Bee, recently wrote an article and was the driver in the publication's online video about GIG. It's the new on-demand, one-way rental car service available in Sacramento and other sele...
Bizjak is the first of our two guests on Episode #83 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Our second guest is Mike Blasky, the Media Relations Specialist of AAA for Northern California, Nevada and Utah. He's based in Walnut Creek, California.

GIG, the one-way car rental service, recently made its Sacramento debut.

GIG (Get In, Go) is working in conjunction with AAA on the project. GIG relies on the Toyota Prius hybrids in San Francisco Bay Area, but the Sacramento region is using all-electric Chevrolet Bolts. An estimated 260 Bolts will be positioned around Sacramento's main neighborhoods and central district of the city by the end of April

Bizjak shares his experience using the GIG app to find the closest vehicle and then takes it for a drive. He also explains the different options of rental time frames and their corresponding payments.

Sacramento is the first city selected by Electrify America for its investment in electric vehicle usage.

Blasky explains AAA's involvement in GIG, details of the program, how the public has reacted to the project.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play

iTunes

Spotify

Stitcher 

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 40:05
#81 Author Libby Edelman on women who love cars https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/04/81-author-libby-edelman-on-women-who-love-cars/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=81-author-libby-edelman-on-women-who-love-cars Mon, 22 Apr 2019 23:58:22 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31066 Libby Edelman spent years raising a family, living in several locations around the United States and working as a fashion editor for national magazines. She also spent a lot of time thinking about women who love their cars, a curiosity prompted by a headline in The National Enquirer. While waiting in line at a grocery store one day, Edelman read in the supermarket tabloid about a woman who loved her car so much, she was buried with it. Lovin' My Car: Women in the Driver's Seati is written by Libby Edelman. The result, while less bizarre but equally dramatic, is the new book Lovin' My Car: Women in the Driver's Seat. Edelman is our guest this week on Episode #81 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with the author the stories and images of women who love driving and love their cars. The book features a range of car styles, fancy to quirky, as well as mundane models uniquely customized.< The women featured in the book all have compelling stories. It's a diverse community, all united through their passion for their cars. The owners of the vehicles are as elegant and quirky as their vehicles. Edelman spent nearly 20 years writing the book, although she had extended writing breaks. The finished product, as the book's notations describe, are "Snapshots celebrating the proud female owner and her motor vehicle paired with an anecdote about the vehicle’s history." While possessing different ages, personalities and life experiences, the women in the book are connected. Edelman believes their cars provide something they may not have known they were missing. In some instances, Edelman explained, the women who bought a great car purchased it because their husbands had a great car. They experienced the enjoyment their spouse had for a vehicle and now were similarly pleased. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. (Lovin' My Car: Women in the Driver's Seat, Libby Edelman; powerHouse Cultural Entertainment, Incorporated; ISBN: 978-1-57687-917-7; 128 pages, $24.95). Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. The book is available on Amazon.com here: Lovin' My Car: Women in the Driver's Seat       Libby Edelman spent years raising a family, living in several locations around the United States and working as a fashion editor for national magazines. She also spent a lot of time thinking about women who love their cars,
While waiting in line at a grocery store one day, Edelman read in the supermarket tabloid about a woman who loved her car so much, she was buried with it.

Lovin' My Car: Women in the Driver's Seati is written by Libby Edelman.

The result, while less bizarre but equally dramatic, is the new book Lovin' My Car: Women in the Driver's Seat.

Edelman is our guest this week on Episode #81 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with the author the stories and images of women who love driving and love their cars. The book features a range of car styles, fancy to quirky, as well as mundane models uniquely customized.<

The women featured in the book all have compelling stories. It's a diverse community, all united through their passion for their cars. The owners of the vehicles are as elegant and quirky as their vehicles.

Edelman spent nearly 20 years writing the book, although she had extended writing breaks. The finished product, as the book's notations describe, are "Snapshots celebrating the proud female owner and her motor vehicle paired with an anecdote about the vehicle’s history."

While possessing different ages, personalities and life experiences, the women in the book are connected. Edelman believes their cars provide something they may not have known they were missing.

In some instances, Edelman explained, the women who bought a great car purchased it because their husbands had a great car. They experienced the enjoyment their spouse had for a vehicle and now were similarly pleased.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

(Lovin' My Car: Women in the Driver's Seat, Libby Edelman; powerHouse Cultural Entertainment, Incorporated; ISBN: 978-1-57687-917-7; 128 pages, $24.95).

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play

iTunes

Spotify

Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.

The book is available on Amazon.com here: Lovin' My Car: Women in the Driver's Seat
]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 31:01
#80, Elon Musk, Toyota Camry and WeatherTech Raceway https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/04/80-elon-musk-toyota-camry-and-weathertech-raceway/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=80-elon-musk-toyota-camry-and-weathertech-raceway Fri, 05 Apr 2019 23:54:35 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31049 There's never a dull moment in the automotive industry — recalls to new technology, debuting vehicles to car shows. In many ways, the world revolves around transportation.  Co-hosts Bruch Aldrich and James Raia discuss several issues on Episode #80 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. The Tu Simple autonomous truck was displayed the GTU conference in San Jose, Calif. Image © James Raia/2019 As a weekly automotive columnist for Bay Area News Group (the San Jose Mercury and East Bay Times in Walnut Creek), I periodically receive letters from readers. Last week, two letters referenced my recent review of the 2019 Toyota Camry. Another reader emailed asking advice about her ailing more than 20-year-old Ford Escort. Bruce has the perfect answers. We also discuss several other topics: * The latest maneuverings of Elon Musk, the always controversial founder of Tesla; * The new automotive season at WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca. (It will conclude in September with the return of IndyCar racing; * A recap of our recent visit to the GTU Technology Conference in San Jose, California. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.   There's never a dull moment in the automotive industry — recalls to new technology, debuting vehicles to car shows. In many ways, the world revolves around transportation.  Co-hosts Bruch Aldrich and James Raia discuss several issues on Episode #80 of...  Co-hosts Bruch Aldrich and James Raia discuss several issues on Episode #80 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.


The Tu Simple autonomous truck was displayed the GTU conference in San Jose, Calif. Image © James Raia/2019
As a weekly automotive columnist for Bay Area News Group (the San Jose Mercury and East Bay Times in Walnut Creek), I periodically receive letters from readers. Last week, two letters referenced my recent review of the 2019 Toyota Camry. Another reader emailed asking advice about her ailing more than 20-year-old Ford Escort. Bruce has the perfect answers.
We also discuss several other topics:
* The latest maneuverings of Elon Musk, the always controversial founder of Tesla;
* The new automotive season at WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca. (It will conclude in September with the return of IndyCar racing;
* A recap of our recent visit to the GTU Technology Conference in San Jose, California.
The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.  ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 35:41
#79 Autonomous future featured at GPU Technology Conference https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/03/79-autonomous-future-featured-at-gpu-technology-conference/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=79-autonomous-future-featured-at-gpu-technology-conference Thu, 28 Mar 2019 23:09:41 +0000 https://theweeklydriver.com/?p=31037 The huge truck cab couldn't have been any more conspicuous. It dominated the back of the main showroom at the recent GPU Technology Conference in San Jose, California, and attracted plenty of attention. The all-electric prototype from TuSimple is aimed at providing cheaper, more-efficient long-hauling trucking. TuSimple, with offices in China and the United States, is among numerous startups working to automate parts of the long-haul trucking and parcel delivery industries. The Chinese electric car XPENG was part of the recent GPU Technolgy Conference in San Jose. As part of the technology, semi-trucks would be allowed to operate beyond the 11-hour daily restriction for human drivers. Bruce Aldrich and James Raia, co-hosts of The Weekly Driver Podcast, interview with Xiaodi Hou, the chief technology officer of TuSimple, as our second guest on our latest episode. With another company representative, we conduct the interview inside the cavernous TuSimple cab. We discuss the future of the autonomous truck industry and the company’s experiences testing its technology. During the episode, all recorded at the conference held at the San Jose Convention Center, will also speak with Robert Liu of XPENG Motors and first guest Cameron Gieda from AutonomouStuff. Liu is the director of program management for the Chinese electric vehicle and technology company based in Beijing but with an office in San Jose. Gieda, the regional sales manager of the AutonomouStuff, discusses the San Jose-based company’s position as a supplier R&D platforms, products, software and engineering services for the advancement of robotics and autonomy systems. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.   The huge truck cab couldn't have been any more conspicuous. It dominated the back of the main showroom at the recent GPU Technology Conference in San Jose, California, and attracted plenty of attention. -
The all-electric prototype from TuSimple is aimed at providing cheaper, more-efficient long-hauling trucking. TuSimple, with offices in China and the United States, is among numerous startups working to automate parts of the long-haul trucking and parcel delivery industries.

The Chinese electric car XPENG was part of the recent GPU Technolgy Conference in San Jose.

As part of the technology, semi-trucks would be allowed to operate beyond the 11-hour daily restriction for human drivers.

Bruce Aldrich and James Raia, co-hosts of The Weekly Driver Podcast, interview with Xiaodi Hou, the chief technology officer of TuSimple, as our second guest on our latest episode. With another company representative, we conduct the interview inside the cavernous TuSimple cab.

We discuss the future of the autonomous truck industry and the company’s experiences testing its technology.

During the episode, all recorded at the conference held at the San Jose Convention Center, will also speak with Robert Liu of XPENG Motors and first guest Cameron Gieda from AutonomouStuff.

Liu is the director of program management for the Chinese electric vehicle and technology company based in Beijing but with an office in San Jose.

Gieda, the regional sales manager of the AutonomouStuff, discusses the San Jose-based company’s position as a supplier R&D platforms, products, software and engineering services for the advancement of robotics and autonomy systems.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play

iTunes

Spotify

Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 24:54
#78 Futurist Mark Pesce discusses the next billion cars https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/03/78-futurist-mark-pesce-discusses-the-next-billion-cars/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=78-futurist-mark-pesce-discusses-the-next-billion-cars Tue, 19 Mar 2019 01:46:34 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=31018 The automotive industry manufactures two cars a second. Never have so many had access to motorized transportation. In the next 15 years — the time it will take to build the next billion cars — the automobile expectations and the experience they provide will transform completely. It's the focus of a new podcast series called The Next Billion Cars, hosted by futurist Mark Pesce. He’s our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Futurist Mark Pesce hosts the podcast The New Billion Cars Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Pesce, reached in Australia via Skype, the premise of the 10-part podcast, which debuted in February. It's produced with innovator Sally Domingue, a Wheels Car of the Year judge, and auto industry insider Drew Smith. An American now living in Australia, Pesce is a futurist, inventor, writer, entrepreneur, educator and podcaster. Pesce co-invented VRML, a 3D interface for the internet, in 1994. The podcast surveys the landscape of electrification, autonomy, mobility — and an automotive future that looks nearly nothing like the past. Dominguez is a multi-award-winning product designer and architect of the Adventurous Thinking innovation strategy which she has implemented at organizations including NASA, Stanford and Breville. Drew is visiting lecturer at the Royal College of Art, advising automotive design Masters and Ph.D. students. He founded the Automobility Group, a global community exploring the future of urbanism, design and software. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.   The automotive industry manufactures two cars a second. Never have so many had access to motorized transportation. In the next 15 years — the time it will take to build the next billion cars — the automobile expectations and the experience they provide...
It's the focus of a new podcast series called The Next Billion Cars, hosted by futurist Mark Pesce. He’s our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Futurist Mark Pesce hosts the podcast The New Billion Cars

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Pesce, reached in Australia via Skype, the premise of the 10-part podcast, which debuted in February. It's produced with innovator Sally Domingue, a Wheels Car of the Year judge, and auto industry insider Drew Smith.

An American now living in Australia, Pesce is a futurist, inventor, writer, entrepreneur, educator and podcaster. Pesce co-invented VRML, a 3D interface for the internet, in 1994.

The podcast surveys the landscape of electrification, autonomy, mobility — and an automotive future that looks nearly nothing like the past.

Dominguez is a multi-award-winning product designer and architect of the Adventurous Thinking innovation strategy which she has implemented at organizations including NASA, Stanford and Breville.

Drew is visiting lecturer at the Royal College of Art, advising automotive design Masters and Ph.D. students. He founded the Automobility Group, a global community exploring the future of urbanism, design and software.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:
Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 27:39
#77, Peugeot president discusses iconic car’s return https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/03/77-peugeot-president-discusses-iconic-cars-return/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=77-peugeot-president-discusses-iconic-cars-return Tue, 12 Mar 2019 17:15:07 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30993 Groupe PSA is the multinational manufacturer of automobiles and motorcycles sold under the Peugeot, Citroën, DS, Opel and Vauxhall brands. In late February, the French company announced it will soon re-introduce Peugeot to the North American market. Larry Dominique, President and CEO, PSA North America, Inc., is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Dominique reasons for the iconic vehicle's return after nearly a three-decade absence. Peugeot will soon return to the North American market Dominique cites facts and figures and industry and trends. He explains that after China, the United States is the world's second-largest car market. The industry is extraordinarily competitive, but Dominique explains Peugeot again realizes it must be sold in North America to correctly be identified as a global brand. With the announcement, Jean-Philippe Imparato, Peugeot Brand Chief Executive Officer, said: “With more than 208 years of history, including two early victories of the Indianapolis 500, Peugeot's international adventure continues with new territories and new challenges. Our clear positioning as the best high-end generalist brand is based on a solid and coherent strategy, which all the teams are eager and proud to bring to the North American customers, with this promise always kept and renewed, to include Peugeot’s Excellence, Allure and Emotion in each of our cars." Dominique didn't offer a time frame or specific vehicles Peugeot will offer in North America. But he did say it will follow industry trends, which likely means an SUV and a hybrid or and electric vehicle. With its pending North America re-entry, Peugeot will be offered in approximately 160 countries on five continents. The brand sold more than 1.7 million vehicles in 2018. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Groupe PSA is the multinational manufacturer of automobiles and motorcycles sold under the Peugeot, Citroën, DS, Opel and Vauxhall brands. In late February, the French company announced it will soon re-introduce Peugeot to the North American market.
Larry Dominique, President and CEO, PSA North America, Inc., is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Dominique reasons for the iconic vehicle's return after nearly a three-decade absence.

Peugeot will soon return to the North American market

Dominique cites facts and figures and industry and trends. He explains that after China, the United States is the world's second-largest car market. The industry is extraordinarily competitive, but Dominique explains Peugeot again realizes it must be sold in North America to correctly be identified as a global brand.

With the announcement, Jean-Philippe Imparato, Peugeot Brand Chief Executive Officer, said:

“With more than 208 years of history, including two early victories of the Indianapolis 500, Peugeot's international adventure continues with new territories and new challenges. Our clear positioning as the best high-end generalist brand is based on a solid and coherent strategy, which all the teams are eager and proud to bring to the North American customers, with this promise always kept and renewed, to include Peugeot’s Excellence, Allure and Emotion in each of our cars."

Dominique didn't offer a time frame or specific vehicles Peugeot will offer in North America. But he did say it will follow industry trends, which likely means an SUV and a hybrid or and electric vehicle.

With its pending North America re-entry, Peugeot will be offered in approximately 160 countries on five continents. The brand sold more than 1.7 million vehicles in 2018.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play

iTunes

Spotify

Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 23:24
#76, Alex Guberman, YouTube electric vehicle maverick https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/03/76-alex-guberman-youtube-electric-vehicle-maverick/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=76-alex-guberman-youtube-electric-vehicle-maverick Fri, 01 Mar 2019 19:07:59 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30941 Alex Guberman is as passionate as anyone about the electric vehicle industry. A recent transplant from the Silicon Valley in the San Francisco Bay Area to Sacramento, California, Guberman runs E For Electric on YouTube. Guberman, now driving his third Tesla, is prolific. He produces three videos per day for his channel. He breaks electric vehicle news. He discusses trends in the industry. And he provides strong opinions. Alex Guberman, EV master on the YouTube channel E for Electric. A new business friend, Guberman is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Guberman, a native of Moscow, Russia, who moved to the United States with his parents in 1992, his success in the electric vehicle industry. Guberman is often a guest at electric vehicle debuts around the world and other industry functions. According to his channel, Guberman provides: "LIVE daily scoop and analysis of what's happening now in the world of electric cars and the exciting technologies around them. "I cover Tesla and Elon Musk with their best hits of Model S, Model X and Model 3, as well as Chevy Bolt, Lucid Air, Nissan Leaf, BMW i3 and many other EVs that are coming out this year!" Among many other topics, we talk with Guberman about Musk and his unique recent behavior. We examine Byton and Rivian, new international start-ups in the electric vehicle industry with connections to Northern California. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher Please also visit The Weekly Driver's You Tube Channel, here The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Alex Guberman is as passionate as anyone about the electric vehicle industry. A recent transplant from the Silicon Valley in the San Francisco Bay Area to Sacramento, California, Guberman runs E For Electric on YouTube. - Guberman,
Guberman, now driving his third Tesla, is prolific. He produces three videos per day for his channel. He breaks electric vehicle news. He discusses trends in the industry. And he provides strong opinions.

Alex Guberman, EV master on the YouTube channel E for Electric.

A new business friend, Guberman is our guest on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Guberman, a native of Moscow, Russia, who moved to the United States with his parents in 1992, his success in the electric vehicle industry.

Guberman is often a guest at electric vehicle debuts around the world and other industry functions.

According to his channel, Guberman provides:

"LIVE daily scoop and analysis of what's happening now in the world of electric cars and the exciting technologies around them.

"I cover Tesla and Elon Musk with their best hits of Model S, Model X and Model 3, as well as Chevy Bolt, Lucid Air, Nissan Leaf, BMW i3 and many other EVs that are coming out this year!"

Among many other topics, we talk with Guberman about Musk and his unique recent behavior. We examine Byton and Rivian, new international start-ups in the electric vehicle industry with connections to Northern California.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play

iTunes

Spotify

Stitcher

Please also visit The Weekly Driver's You Tube Channel, here

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 46:08
#75, Rivian gearing up for electric SUV, pick-up debuts https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/02/75-rivian-gearing-up-for-electric-suv-pick-up-debuts/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=75-rivian-gearing-up-for-electric-suv-pick-up-debuts Fri, 22 Feb 2019 20:20:31 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30929 Rivian debuted two concepts last November at the Los Angeles Auto Show and attracted as much attention as any vehicle at the automotive industry's first major show of the year. The all-electric concepts, the R1T pick-up and R1S SUV, have gained substantial attention since. The vehicles' debut is scheduled for late 2020 through direct sales. The Rivian concept is an all-electric SUV with 0-60 mph speed in 3.0 seconds and a 400-mile range. Image © James Raia/2018 Michael McHale, the company's director of communications, is our guest on this week's episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with McHale the pending debut of the vehicles and how the innovated truck and SUV could change the automotive landscape. The company has been touted as a competitor to Tesla, a proposition it welcomes. Rivian was founded nearly 10 years ago by Mainstream Motors in Florida. Its name was changed to Avera and now Rivian. The SUV and pick-up have beautiful futuristic designs and impressive specs, including a 400-plus mile range and 0-60 miles per hour acceleration in 3.0 seconds. Among other topics, we also discuss with McHale, how Rivian was named, its eco-friendly mission, level 3 autonomy, pricing and available deposit reservations. Rivian also has a brand partner relationship with Alex Honnold. The Las Vegas-based mountain climber whose ascent of El Capitan in Yosemite is subject of the move Free Solo has an environmental-based foundation. Honnold is a past guest on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Listen here. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Rivian debuted two concepts last November at the Los Angeles Auto Show and attracted as much attention as any vehicle at the automotive industry's first major show of the year. - The all-electric concepts, the R1T pick-up and R1S SUV,
The all-electric concepts, the R1T pick-up and R1S SUV, have gained substantial attention since. The vehicles' debut is scheduled for late 2020 through direct sales.

The Rivian concept is an all-electric SUV with 0-60 mph speed in 3.0 seconds and a 400-mile range. Image © James Raia/2018

Michael McHale, the company's director of communications, is our guest on this week's episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with McHale the pending debut of the vehicles and how the innovated truck and SUV could change the automotive landscape. The company has been touted as a competitor to Tesla, a proposition it welcomes.

Rivian was founded nearly 10 years ago by Mainstream Motors in Florida. Its name was changed to Avera and now Rivian. The SUV and pick-up have beautiful futuristic designs and impressive specs, including a 400-plus mile range and 0-60 miles per hour acceleration in 3.0 seconds.

Among other topics, we also discuss with McHale, how Rivian was named, its eco-friendly mission, level 3 autonomy, pricing and available deposit reservations.

Rivian also has a brand partner relationship with Alex Honnold. The Las Vegas-based mountain climber whose ascent of El Capitan in Yosemite is subject of the move Free Solo has an environmental-based foundation. Honnold is a past guest on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Listen here.

The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 34:23
#74, National Transportation Safety Board Most Wanted https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/02/74-national-transportation-safety-board-most-wanted/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=74-national-transportation-safety-board-most-wanted Sat, 16 Feb 2019 05:58:20 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30897 The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) began in 1966 and since 1990 it has announced a Most Wanted List of Transportation Safety Improvements. Its recently released list for 2019-2020 includes 46 recommendations. Bruce Landsberg, the board's vice chairman, is our special guest on this week's episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Bruce Landsberg, Vice Chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board in Washington, D.C., is our special guest on episode #74 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Landsberg, the former president of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, was confirmed last summer to his position as one of five board members of the independent investigative agency based in Washington, D.C. A former co-chairman of the runway safety program for the Federal Aviation Administration, Landsberg, will serve a five-year term. He was nominated to the position by the current White House administration. During The Weekly Driver Podcast's 35-minute interview, co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Landsberg many of the top-10 recommendations that affect the automotive industry. We also talk with Landsberg about other current important issues facing the automotive industry. Here's the Most Wanted List, among the 267 changes, 46 in the next two years, the NTSB is seeking: * Eliminating distractions; * Ending alcohol and drug impairment; * Ensuring the safe shipment of hazardous materials; * Fully implementing positive train control; * Implementing a comprehensive strategy to reduce speeding-related crashes; * Improving the safety of Part 135 aircraft flight operations; * Increasing implementation of collision avoidance systems in all new highway vehicles; * Reducing fatigue-related accidents; * Requiring medical fitness screening for and treating obstructive sleep apnea, and Strengthening occupant protection; The NTSB's biennial list serves an agency’s primary advocacy tool to help save lives, prevent injuries, and reduce property damage resulting from transportation accidents. To learn more about the NTSB’s current transportation safety improvements or the NTSB safety recommendations associated with the list, visit: https://go.usa.gov/xEXR8. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) began in 1966 and since 1990 it has announced a Most Wanted List of Transportation Safety Improvements. Its recently released list for 2019-2020 includes 46 recommendations. - Bruce Landsberg,
Bruce Landsberg, the board's vice chairman, is our special guest on this week's episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Bruce Landsberg, Vice Chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board in Washington, D.C., is our special guest on episode #74 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Landsberg, the former president of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, was confirmed last summer to his position as one of five board members of the independent investigative agency based in Washington, D.C.

A former co-chairman of the runway safety program for the Federal Aviation Administration, Landsberg, will serve a five-year term. He was nominated to the position by the current White House administration.

During The Weekly Driver Podcast's 35-minute interview, co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Landsberg many of the top-10 recommendations that affect the automotive industry. We also talk with Landsberg about other current important issues facing the automotive industry.

Here's the Most Wanted List, among the 267 changes, 46 in the next two years, the NTSB is seeking:

* Eliminating distractions;
* Ending alcohol and drug impairment;
* Ensuring the safe shipment of hazardous materials;
* Fully implementing positive train control;
* Implementing a comprehensive strategy to reduce speeding-related crashes;
* Improving the safety of Part 135 aircraft flight operations;
* Increasing implementation of collision avoidance systems in all new highway vehicles;
* Reducing fatigue-related accidents;
* Requiring medical fitness screening for and treating obstructive sleep apnea, and
Strengthening occupant protection;

The NTSB's biennial list serves an agency’s primary advocacy tool to help save lives, prevent injuries, and reduce property damage resulting from transportation accidents.

To learn more about the NTSB’s current transportation safety improvements or the NTSB safety recommendations associated with the list, visit: https://go.usa.gov/xEXR8.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast
Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 34:15
#73, Saving teenage drivers’ lives with Xbox Driving Essentials https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/02/73-saving-teenage-drivers-lives-with-xbox-driving-essentials/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=73-saving-teenage-drivers-lives-with-xbox-driving-essentials Sun, 10 Feb 2019 19:59:11 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30883 Driving Essentials XE is an interactive and engaging driver training simulation made specifically for Xbox. It teaches new, teenage drivers how to deal with dangerous situations without actually being in danger. The vast majority of all serious teen crashes are due to critical (and preventable) mistakes — lack of judgment, lack of experience and driving distracted. Bob Davis, the Founder & Chief Executive Officer of Virtual Driver Interactive, Inc., the manufacturer of the new product, is our guest on The Weekly Driver Podcast. Driving Essentials XE is a new product to help save teenage drivers' lives. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Davis the soon-to-be-available product and how believes teenaged drivers' lives will be saved. With its 10-lesson course, the goal Driving XE is to change driving behavior and foster better judgment rapidly. First responders, pilots and surgeons use simulators to improve their skills. Now, teenagers can, too. And we reach them where they are (first driver training simulation designed for a gaming console). Virtual Driving Essentials and Driving XE, Davis says, is the answer to a sobering statistic. Sixteen-year-olds are three times more like to be in traffic accidents than other groups and eleven teens die every day as a result of texting and driving. According to Davis, the company's teenage driver training products, have real-time "life bars" running across the top of the monitors. Safe driving earns you more time and making any errors that increase your likelihood of a crash deduct from your bar as they happen. Kids don't care about a score after they are done. They care about their score as they drive. Plus, our company cares about keeping teens safe so the "life bar" holds great meaning to all of us. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Driving Essentials XE is an interactive and engaging driver training simulation made specifically for Xbox. It teaches new, teenage drivers how to deal with dangerous situations without actually being in danger.
Bob Davis, the Founder & Chief Executive Officer of Virtual Driver Interactive, Inc., the manufacturer of the new product, is our guest on The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Driving Essentials XE is a new product to help save teenage drivers' lives.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Davis the soon-to-be-available product and how believes teenaged drivers' lives will be saved.

With its 10-lesson course, the goal Driving XE is to change driving behavior and foster better judgment rapidly. First responders, pilots and surgeons use simulators to improve their skills. Now, teenagers can, too.

And we reach them where they are (first driver training simulation designed for a gaming console).

Virtual Driving Essentials and Driving XE, Davis says, is the answer to a sobering statistic. Sixteen-year-olds are three times more like to be in traffic accidents than other groups and eleven teens die every day as a result of texting and driving.

According to Davis, the company's teenage driver training products, have real-time "life bars" running across the top of the monitors. Safe driving earns you more time and making any errors that increase your likelihood of a crash deduct from your bar as they happen.

Kids don't care about a score after they are done. They care about their score as they drive. Plus, our company cares about keeping teens safe so the "life bar" holds great meaning to all of us.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast
Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 25:33
#72 The Weekly Driver Podcast: David Ankin/ToyMakerz https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/02/72-the-weekly-driver-podcast-david-ankin-toymakerz/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=72-the-weekly-driver-podcast-david-ankin-toymakerz Sun, 03 Feb 2019 02:24:27 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30867 More than 40 years ago, Top Gear debuted as a monthly, 30-minute magazine-style, automotive-related program on the British Broadcasting Corporation. It was based in Birmingham, England, and the initial episode’s topics included speed traps, fuel economy and strange road signs. A year later, the program expanded to a weekly format and it was broadcast for nearly a quarter century. David Ankin (center) and his colleagues from the automotive reality show, ToyMakerz. Simultaneously, much has changed and not much has changed in automotive programming. Enthusiasts are still as passionate about cars and truck and driving. Speed, fuel usage and bizarre things on the road are all still topics for automotive reality television programs. Shows like the rekindled version of Top Gear, American Chopper and Monster Garage brought the concept to greater prominence in the early 2000s with the unique personalities of hosts such as Jeremy Clarkson, Paul Teutul, and Jesse James. Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee and Jay Leno’s Garage have captured mainstream audiences with little interest in automobiles. Nearly every network now has an automotive reality show. At least one program, ToyMakerz, has a star who had no desire to be on television. Which is why, in part, the show is increasingly popular. The host is David Ankin, a former stuntman, motorcycle racer, fabricator and customizer, and former restaurant owner. He’s catapulted the small city of Reidsville, N.C., where his ToyMakers, Inc. company shop is located, into the national spotlight. The show follows Ankin and his team, including teenage son, as it builds a one-off custom vehicle or enhances an original car. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview Ankin on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. “In the big scheme of things, I never wanted to do a TV, ever,” said Ankin. “It was never in my plans. I have friends who have TV shows, but I wasn’t interested, at all. But I had a guy one time tell what a great avenue it is to advertise your business. I started thinking about it for a couple of years, and he was right.” The third season of ToyMakerz, featuring eight episodes, will debut March 10 on its new network affiliation, DRIVE. It’s a programming block on A+E Networks’ FYI and HISTORY channels. DRIVE will be broadcast on HISTORY on Sunday mornings from 7 a.m. to noon and Saturday on FYI from 5 p.m. to midnight. The networks are available throughout the extended San Francisco Bay Area. As the program’s moniker declares: It’s unique toys for big boys. Ankin drives the creations he makes to extremes. Unlike other reality shows, drama isn’t infused into ToyMakerz. Each episode unfolds with plenty. The reality? The show is real. “There a lot of guys who build things as a piece of art and that’s exactly what it is for me,” said Ankin. “But if you can’t drive it, what good is it? I want to drive everything I have. I build them to drive them. I don’t enter car shows. I don’t care about any of that stuff. I want to drive the cars and I want to drive them hard.” Episodes in season three will include a twin-seat, front-engine dragster for the street, custom racing drones, and a Willys exhibition car. Legendary NASCAR driver and car owner Richard Petty and actor Dean Cain will be among the guests. “I live, eat and breath the show,” said Ankin, whose brand includes a sizable social media following, merchandise sales and public appearances. “You're constantly taking care of your brands, your fans. You’re taking care of the shop, your family life, and you’re taking care of employees. We have 35 of 45 people who work for us. I love what I do. It’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done and probably the most rewarding.” The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media account... More than 40 years ago, Top Gear debuted as a monthly, 30-minute magazine-style, automotive-related program on the British Broadcasting Corporation. It was based in Birmingham, England, and the initial episode’s topics included speed traps,
A year later, the program expanded to a weekly format and it was broadcast for nearly a quarter century.

David Ankin (center) and his colleagues from the automotive reality show, ToyMakerz.

Simultaneously, much has changed and not much has changed in automotive programming. Enthusiasts are still as passionate about cars and truck and driving. Speed, fuel usage and bizarre things on the road are all still topics for automotive reality television programs.

Shows like the rekindled version of Top Gear, American Chopper and Monster Garage brought the concept to greater prominence in the early 2000s with the unique personalities of hosts such as Jeremy Clarkson, Paul Teutul, and Jesse James. Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee and Jay Leno’s Garage have captured mainstream audiences with little interest in automobiles.

Nearly every network now has an automotive reality show. At least one program, ToyMakerz, has a star who had no desire to be on television. Which is why, in part, the show is increasingly popular.

The host is David Ankin, a former stuntman, motorcycle racer, fabricator and customizer, and former restaurant owner. He’s catapulted the small city of Reidsville, N.C., where his ToyMakers, Inc. company shop is located, into the national spotlight. The show follows Ankin and his team, including teenage son, as it builds a one-off custom vehicle or enhances an original car.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview Ankin on this episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

“In the big scheme of things, I never wanted to do a TV, ever,” said Ankin. “It was never in my plans. I have friends who have TV shows, but I wasn’t interested, at all. But I had a guy one time tell what a great avenue it is to advertise your business. I started thinking about it for a couple of years, and he was right.”

The third season of ToyMakerz, featuring eight episodes, will debut March 10 on its new network affiliation, DRIVE. It’s a programming block on A+E Networks’ FYI and HISTORY channels.

DRIVE will be broadcast on HISTORY on Sunday mornings from 7 a.m. to noon and Saturday on FYI from 5 p.m. to midnight. The networks are available throughout the extended San Francisco Bay Area.

As the program’s moniker declares: It’s unique toys for big boys. Ankin drives the creations he makes to extremes. Unlike other reality shows, drama isn’t infused into ToyMakerz. Each episode unfolds with plenty. The reality? The show is real.

“There a lot of guys who build things as a piece of art and that’s exactly what it is for me,” said Ankin. “But if you can’t drive it, what good is it? I want to drive everything I have. I build them to drive them. I don’t enter car shows. I don’t care about any of that stuff. I want to drive the cars and I want to drive them hard.”

Episodes in season three will include a twin-seat, front-engine dragster for the street, custom racing drones, and a Willys exhibition car. Legendary NASCAR driver and car owner Richard Petty and actor Dean Cain will be among the guests.

“I live, eat and breath the show,” said Ankin, whose brand includes a sizable social media following, merchandise sales and public appearances.

“You're constantly taking care of your brands, your fans. You’re taking care of the shop, your family life, and you’re taking care of employees. We have 35 of 45 people who work for us. I love what I do.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 39:30
#71 WalletHub’s best, worst cities, states to drive in https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/01/71-wallethubs-best-worst-cities-states-to-drive-in/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=71-wallethubs-best-worst-cities-states-to-drive-in Tue, 29 Jan 2019 01:01:56 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30845 WalletHub.com does studies, and it does them well. It makes sense because it’s a personal finance website that relies on facts and figures and number crunching for consumers. In the automotive field, WalletHub has a series of studies, the most recent on the 2019 Best & Worst Cities to Drive in. The numbers are revealing. WalletHub reports California is among the worst states to driven in. WalletHub determined that congestion costs the average driver in the United States more than $1,400 per year. The U.S. is ranked 10th in the world in road quality in the recently released study. The Weekly Driver Podcast is produced in Sacramento, so co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia were particularly interested in how California ranks in different areas. Consider California’s numbers (1=Best; 25=Ave.): • 42nd – Share of Rush-Hour Traffic Congestion • 47th – Car Theft Rate • 49th – Avg. Gas Prices • 40th – Auto-Maintenance Costs • 47th – Road Quality To determine the most driver-friendly states in the U.S., WalletHub compared the 50 states across 30 key metrics. The data set ranges from average gas prices to share of rush-hour traffic congestion to road quality. The full study lists the results for all states Jill Gonzalez, a WalletHub analyst, discusses the website’s latest study and how it relates to consumers. WalletHub also has automotive studies on the following topics: • Best & Worst Cities to Drive in • Best & Worst States for Teen Drivers • Best & Worst Cities for Staycations • Credit Score & Car Insurance Report • Strictest And Most Lenient States On DUI To read the complete results, visit: WalletHub.com The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. WalletHub.com does studies, and it does them well. It makes sense because it’s a personal finance website that relies on facts and figures and number crunching for consumers. - In the automotive field, WalletHub has a series of studies,
In the automotive field, WalletHub has a series of studies, the most recent on the 2019 Best & Worst Cities to Drive in. The numbers are revealing.

WalletHub reports California is among the worst states to driven in.

WalletHub determined that congestion costs the average driver in the United States more than $1,400 per year. The U.S. is ranked 10th in the world in road quality in the recently released study.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is produced in Sacramento, so co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia were particularly interested in how California ranks in different areas.

Consider California’s numbers (1=Best; 25=Ave.):

• 42nd – Share of Rush-Hour Traffic Congestion
• 47th – Car Theft Rate
• 49th – Avg. Gas Prices
• 40th – Auto-Maintenance Costs
• 47th – Road Quality

To determine the most driver-friendly states in the U.S., WalletHub compared the 50 states across 30 key metrics. The data set ranges from average gas prices to share of rush-hour traffic congestion to road quality. The full study lists the results for all states

Jill Gonzalez, a WalletHub analyst, discusses the website’s latest study and how it relates to consumers.

WalletHub also has automotive studies on the following topics:

• Best & Worst Cities to Drive in
• Best & Worst States for Teen Drivers
• Best & Worst Cities for Staycations
• Credit Score & Car Insurance Report
• Strictest And Most Lenient States On DUI

To read the complete results, visit: WalletHub.com

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast
Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 29:06
#70, Journalist, photographer John Lamm’s new supercar book https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/01/70-journalist-photographer-john-lamms-new-supercar-book/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=70-journalist-photographer-john-lamms-new-supercar-book Fri, 18 Jan 2019 01:41:04 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30822 John Lamm is a journalist and photographer who has worked for decades for many of the automotive industry's most prestigious magazines. He's also the author of several books, including the new release, Supercar Revolution: The Fastest Cars Of All Time. Sub-titled "The one-stop guide to world-class supercar and their battle for ultimate performance and supremacy," Lamm's coffeetable-sized volume is essential for anyone who admires, dreams of, or owns a supercar of their own. Journalist, photographer John Lamm has a new book, Supercar Revolution. The veteran journalist is our guest on episode #70 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. It's also our first episode on video. It will be posted separately. Hamm's book is cleverly organized by decades but also m.p.h. “Section 1: The First Wave, 1967-1978” features the first supercars in the 150-190 m.p.h range., including the Lamborghini Miura and Countach. “Section 2: The Group B Connection, 1983-1991” includes supercars that can run 163-220 m.p.h and features the likes of the Ferrari F40, Acura NSX and The Vector. “Section 3: The Modern Supercar Era 1992-Present” features the fastest of all, supercars that go 190-250 m.p.h., and includes the McLaren F1, Bugatti Veyron, Ford GT, Pagani Huayra and more. Bruce and I discuss with Hamm the book-writing process and his long tenure as an automotive journalist and photographer. We also discuss his relationships with icons of the automotive world, including comedian Jay Leno. The book includes a feature on Leno, host of Jay Leno’s Garage and one of the world's best-known automotive collectors and enthusiasts. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. All podcast episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Support our podcast by shopping for Hamm's book or any other purchase on our affiliate program on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. John Lamm is a journalist and photographer who has worked for decades for many of the automotive industry's most prestigious magazines. He's also the author of several books, including the new release, Supercar Revolution: The Fastest Cars Of All Time....
Sub-titled "The one-stop guide to world-class supercar and their battle for ultimate performance and supremacy," Lamm's coffeetable-sized volume is essential for anyone who admires, dreams of, or owns a supercar of their own.

Journalist, photographer John Lamm has a new book, Supercar Revolution.

The veteran journalist is our guest on episode #70 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. It's also our first episode on video. It will be posted separately.

Hamm's book is cleverly organized by decades but also m.p.h.

“Section 1: The First Wave, 1967-1978” features the first supercars in the 150-190 m.p.h range., including the Lamborghini Miura and Countach.

“Section 2: The Group B Connection, 1983-1991” includes supercars that can run 163-220 m.p.h and features the likes of the Ferrari F40, Acura NSX and The Vector.

“Section 3: The Modern Supercar Era 1992-Present” features the fastest of all, supercars that go 190-250 m.p.h., and includes the McLaren F1, Bugatti Veyron, Ford GT, Pagani Huayra and more.

Bruce and I discuss with Hamm the book-writing process and his long tenure as an automotive journalist and photographer. We also discuss his relationships with icons of the automotive world, including comedian Jay Leno. The book includes a feature on Leno, host of Jay Leno’s Garage and one of the world's best-known automotive collectors and enthusiasts.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

All podcast episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.

Support our podcast by shopping for Hamm's book or any other purchase on our affiliate program on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 31:41
#69 Ford Edge ST debuts as carmaker’s performance SUV https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/01/69-ford-edge-st-debuts-as-carmakers-performance-suv/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=69-ford-edge-st-debuts-as-carmakers-performance-suv Tue, 15 Jan 2019 05:26:41 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30802 Tyler Swedensky is the new car manager at Future Ford in Sacramento, California, and he's good at what he does. With co-host Bruce Aldrich driving and me observing as a back- seat passenger, Swedensky recently took us for a test drive and preview of the 2019 Ford Edge ST. The 2019 Ford Edge ST is the manufacturer's new performance SUV. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2019 Ford is marketing the new vehicle as its first performance SUV, and Swedensky is our guest on this week's episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. After our ride, Bruce and I asked our guest about the Edge ST from the offices of the Sacramento dealership. He explained the SUV's innovative Co-Pilot 360. It's a suite of standard driver- assist technologies. Features include a blind spot information system, lane keeping system, enhanced active park assist and automatic emergency braking with Pedestrian Detection. Ford motto's for the SUV: "The Edge ST has the feel of an SUV with the heart of a sports car." We also discussed with our guest the future of Ford as one of several manufacturers, emphasizing their SUV and truck lineups and shrinking or eliminating the sale of sedans. And we also discussed some of Ford's vehicles and what the manufacturer may do next. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Tyler Swedensky is the new car manager at Future Ford in Sacramento, California, and he's good at what he does. - With co-host Bruce Aldrich driving and me observing as a back- seat passenger, Swedensky recently took us for a test drive and preview of...
With co-host Bruce Aldrich driving and me observing as a back- seat passenger, Swedensky recently took us for a test drive and preview of the 2019 Ford Edge ST.

The 2019 Ford Edge ST is the manufacturer's new performance SUV. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2019

Ford is marketing the new vehicle as its first performance SUV, and Swedensky is our guest on this week's episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

After our ride, Bruce and I asked our guest about the Edge ST from the offices of the Sacramento dealership. He explained the SUV's innovative Co-Pilot 360. It's a suite of standard driver- assist technologies. Features include a blind spot information system, lane keeping system, enhanced active park assist and automatic emergency braking with Pedestrian Detection.

Ford motto's for the SUV: "The Edge ST has the feel of an SUV with the heart of a sports car."

We also discussed with our guest the future of Ford as one of several manufacturers, emphasizing their SUV and truck lineups and shrinking or eliminating the sale of sedans.

And we also discussed some of Ford's vehicles and what the manufacturer may do next.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 22:38
#68, Driven to Drive, 2018 podcast year in review https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/01/68-driven-to-drive-2018-podcast-year-in-review/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=68-driven-to-drive-2018-podcast-year-in-review Mon, 07 Jan 2019 20:59:55 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30786 Max Mack has owned his share of vehicles. Like other car enthusiasts, he appreciates fast cars and automobile history, and he likes to associate with like-minded individuals. It's why the Sacramento businessman began Driven to Drive. Mack organizes social meet-ups among car enthusiasts and businesses around Northern California — wineries to urban locales. It a great way to mix and share automobiles stories and with support from regional businesses. Max Mack is the owner of Driven to Drive in Sacramento. Mack is our guest on episode #68 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia talk with Mack about his new business, his long-time interest in cars, membership in the organization and plans for Driven to Drive in 2019. Driven to Drive’s mission statement: “We love cars. We love driving cars. We are Driven to Drive! Whether you roll a brand new performance or luxury whip or sport a rare, exotic or vintage pony,  join us at cool, memorable venues throughout the region. We aim to introduce valued business partners to support your automobile, personal and professional lifestyles. Start your engines and let's go!” In our second segment, we review 2018 and our varied podcast subjects. We broadcast every week (with a few exceptions) and we've interviewed athletes, industry experts, manufacturer representatives and innovators. Bruce and I revisit one podcast for every month of last year. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Max Mack has owned his share of vehicles. Like other car enthusiasts, he appreciates fast cars and automobile history, and he likes to associate with like-minded individuals. - It's why the Sacramento businessman began Driven to Drive.
It's why the Sacramento businessman began Driven to Drive. Mack organizes social meet-ups among car enthusiasts and businesses around Northern California — wineries to urban locales. It a great way to mix and share automobiles stories and with support from regional businesses.

Max Mack is the owner of Driven to Drive in Sacramento.

Mack is our guest on episode #68 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia talk with Mack about his new business, his long-time interest in cars, membership in the organization and plans for Driven to Drive in 2019.

Driven to Drive’s mission statement: “We love cars. We love driving cars. We are Driven to Drive! Whether you roll a brand new performance or luxury whip or sport a rare, exotic or vintage pony,  join us at cool, memorable venues throughout the region. We aim to introduce valued business partners to support your automobile, personal and professional lifestyles. Start your engines and let's go!”

In our second segment, we review 2018 and our varied podcast subjects. We broadcast every week (with a few exceptions) and we've interviewed athletes, industry experts, manufacturer representatives and innovators. Bruce and I revisit one podcast for every month of last year.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:
Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 34:31
67, 2018 automotive world recap, cars of the year https://theweeklydriver.com/2019/01/67-2018-automotive-world-recap-cars-of-the-year/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=67-2018-automotive-world-recap-cars-of-the-year Thu, 03 Jan 2019 21:40:40 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30784 With the end of one year and the beginning of another, it's always a good time to look back at what happened in the automotive world in the past 12 months and pick cars of the year. It was an ideal time to be part of an industry in 2018. Alternative fuels, ride-sharing platforms, alternative fuel, and the increasing interest in vintage cars and trucks. It was a whirlwind year. The Genesis G80 and G90 are among TheWeeklyDriver.com's Cars of the Year. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia recap the year in Episode #67 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. We focus on the top-10 cars of the year I selected as editor and publisher of www.theweeklydriver.com. Most industry publications and organizations select vehicles of the year in the preceding calendar year. At the Los Angeles Auto Show in November, the 2019 Genesis G70 received several car-of-the-year awards. Genesis is deserving of praise, but its accolades follow the long-time practice of honoring cars too early. We discuss the best cars of the year at the end of the year. It seems more logical to have time to consider all vehicles and add perspective to the selections. My selections for 2018 were chosen from estimated 40 cars and trucks I reviewed in 2018. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Please support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Prices are the same as shopping directly from Amazon, and we receive a small commission to help defray the costs of the podcast. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. With the end of one year and the beginning of another, it's always a good time to look back at what happened in the automotive world in the past 12 months and pick cars of the year. - It was an ideal time to be part of an industry in 2018.
It was an ideal time to be part of an industry in 2018. Alternative fuels, ride-sharing platforms, alternative fuel, and the increasing interest in vintage cars and trucks. It was a whirlwind year.

The Genesis G80 and G90 are among TheWeeklyDriver.com's Cars of the Year.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia recap the year in Episode #67 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. We focus on the top-10 cars of the year I selected as editor and publisher of www.theweeklydriver.com.

Most industry publications and organizations select vehicles of the year in the preceding calendar year. At the Los Angeles Auto Show in November, the 2019 Genesis G70 received several car-of-the-year awards. Genesis is deserving of praise, but its accolades follow the long-time practice of honoring cars too early.

We discuss the best cars of the year at the end of the year. It seems more logical to have time to consider all vehicles and add perspective to the selections. My selections for 2018 were chosen from estimated 40 cars and trucks I reviewed in 2018.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Please support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Prices are the same as shopping directly from Amazon, and we receive a small commission to help defray the costs of the podcast.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 37:26
#66, On demand insurance, year-end car deals https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/12/66-on-demand-insurance-year-end-car-deals/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=66-on-demand-insurance-year-end-car-deals Mon, 31 Dec 2018 18:43:41 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30755 Welcome to another episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast, our last broadcast in 2018 and our 66th episode. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview Ian Sweeney and Julie Blackley. The Weekly Driver Podcast #66 reports on on-demand insurance and best end-of-the-year new car deals. Sweeney is General Manager of Trov Mobility based in Danville, California. He explains the company's motto: "Insurance billed by second, day, mile, event. . . . whatever you need." The on-demand insurance company found that 56 percent of 2,000 respondents in a recent survey believe it’s more economical to use shared transportation than own a vehicle. Not surprisingly Millennials, ages 22-37, (39 percent) are more likely to be willing to make the sacrifice than their Gen X, ages 38-53, (30 percent) and Boomer, ages 54-72, (15 percent) counterparts. Men (31 percent) are slightly more likely to be willing to give up their vehicle than women (22 percent). Blackley is an analyst for iseecars.com, the online automotive search engine and research website. She's our second guest on this week's episode. As she was during her first appearance, Blackley is whirlwind of automotive statistics. This time, as she details, “the site looked at the used cars that have the most year-end deals, and also did a deeper analysis to include SUVs, pickups and discontinued/soon-to-be discontinued cars." To find out, iSeeCars analyzed more 2.4 million one-to five-year-old used cars sold to determine which cars are most likely to offer savings of at least 5 percent (or $1,000 on the average used car price of $20,243) during the month of December. Blackley details that sedans are most likely to be discounted by at least 5 percent at the end of the year. Eight of the 10 vehicles on the list are a sedan, with six compact cars. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Welcome to another episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast, our last broadcast in 2018 and our 66th episode. - Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview Ian Sweeney and Julie Blackley. - The Weekly Driver Podcast #66 reports on on-demand insurance...
Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview Ian Sweeney and Julie Blackley.

The Weekly Driver Podcast #66 reports on on-demand insurance and best end-of-the-year new car deals.

Sweeney is General Manager of Trov Mobility based in Danville, California. He explains the company's motto:

"Insurance billed by second, day, mile, event. . . . whatever you need."

The on-demand insurance company found that 56 percent of 2,000 respondents in a recent survey believe it’s more economical to use shared transportation than own a vehicle.

Not surprisingly Millennials, ages 22-37, (39 percent) are more likely to be willing to make the sacrifice than their Gen X, ages 38-53, (30 percent) and Boomer, ages 54-72, (15
percent) counterparts.

Men (31 percent) are slightly more likely to be willing to give up their vehicle than women (22 percent).

Blackley is an analyst for iseecars.com, the online automotive search engine and research website. She's our second guest on this week's episode. As she was during her first appearance, Blackley is whirlwind of automotive statistics.

This time, as she details, “the site looked at the used cars that have the most year-end deals, and also did a deeper analysis to include SUVs, pickups and discontinued/soon-to-be discontinued cars."

To find out, iSeeCars analyzed more 2.4 million one-to five-year-old used cars sold to determine which cars are most likely to offer savings of at least 5 percent (or $1,000 on the average used car price of $20,243) during the month of December.

Blackley details that sedans are most likely to be discounted by at least 5 percent at the end of the year. Eight of the 10 vehicles on the list are a sedan, with six compact cars.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 37:59
#65, GOFAR driving data, holiday driving hazards https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/12/65-gofar-driving-data-holiday-driving-hazards/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=65-gofar-driving-data-holiday-driving-hazards Thu, 13 Dec 2018 22:34:22 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30703 Welcome to the latest episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. We have a two-part broadcast with an entrepreneur from Australia and a discussion with an insurance industry analyst about driving hazards during holiday travel. Our first guest is Ian Davidson, the co-founder of GOFAR. It's a telematics device that connects vehicles to the cloud. Winter weather increases potential driving hazards. Named one of the "Top 10 Coolest things in the world" by GQ magazine, we reach Davidson in Sydney. He discusses with co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia how the product works and its global appeal in dozens of countries. It’s available on Amazon here: GOFAR - The easiest way to log business mileage Davidson shares his experiences with the product, public feedback and upgrades planned for the device the help drivers collect data about their driving habits. Our second guest is Jason Hargraves an analyst and managing editor of InsuranceQuotes.com in Austin, Texas. According to the company's new data in its Holiday Hazards study, many Americans report increased risks during the holiday season, including more potential hazards while driving. We discuss with Hargraves precautionary tips for drivers during the holiday season as well as insurance rules reminders for those who have experienced car thefts of holiday packages and other problems. Hargraves also details travel tips for drivers traveling during the holidays in inclement weather. “The holiday season is a time of year filled with joy as we gather with loved ones—but unfortunately, it’s also a time filled with risk," said Hargraves. “Taking preventative steps in advance, like using the Amazon Key, is a simple way to keep burglars at bay while avoiding the headache of losing holiday gifts.” The study was conducted in November for insuranceQuotes.com among a sample of 1,001 respondents. The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Welcome to the latest episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. We have a two-part broadcast with an entrepreneur from Australia and a discussion with an insurance industry analyst about driving hazards during holiday travel. -
Our first guest is Ian Davidson, the co-founder of GOFAR. It's a telematics device that connects vehicles to the cloud.

Winter weather increases potential driving hazards.

Named one of the "Top 10 Coolest things in the world" by GQ magazine, we reach Davidson in Sydney. He discusses with co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia how the product works and its global appeal in dozens of countries. It’s available on Amazon here:

GOFAR - The easiest way to log business mileage
Davidson shares his experiences with the product, public feedback and upgrades planned for the device the help drivers collect data about their driving habits.

Our second guest is Jason Hargraves an analyst and managing editor of InsuranceQuotes.com in Austin, Texas.

According to the company's new data in its Holiday Hazards study, many Americans report increased risks during the holiday season, including more potential hazards while driving.

We discuss with Hargraves precautionary tips for drivers during the holiday season as well as insurance rules reminders for those who have experienced car thefts of holiday packages and other problems.

Hargraves also details travel tips for drivers traveling during the holidays in inclement weather.

“The holiday season is a time of year filled with joy as we gather with loved ones—but unfortunately, it’s also a time filled with risk," said Hargraves. “Taking preventative steps in advance, like using the Amazon Key, is a simple way to keep burglars at bay while avoiding the headache of losing holiday gifts.”

The study was conducted in November for insuranceQuotes.com among a sample of 1,001 respondents.

The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.

Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com.

Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.

All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast

Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:

Google Play

iTunes

Spotify

Stitcher

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 35:52
#64, LA Auto Show, holiday driving habits https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/12/64-la-auto-show-holiday-driving-habits/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=64-la-auto-show-holiday-driving-habits Tue, 11 Dec 2018 00:02:05 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30687 Welcome to another episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. In this week's two-part presentation, we recap the recently concluded LA Auto Show and we discuss drivers' habits during the holidays with Laura Adams of DriversEd.com. As the first major auto show of the year, the LA Auto Show is always chock-full of innovation. This year was no different. Two concept vehicles, Byton and Rivian, both soon scheduled for their public debuts, attracted a lot of attention. The Rivian concept is an all-electric SUV with 0-60 mph speed in 3.0 seconds and a 400-mile range. The new company also has an all-electric pickup. Image © James Raia/2018. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the Byton and its building reputation as a potential rival for Tesla. And we also exchange ideas on Rivian. It plans on debuting the first electric pick-up truck as well as an SUV with the next year. The Rivian models are being touted with 0-60 mph acceleration in 3.0 second and in higher-priced trims with respective ranges of 400 miles.In the second half go the episode, Bruce and James  discuss with Adams the results of the online driving school's recent survey drivers' habits during the holiday season. A repeat guest, Adams is a statistical whirlwind. We discuss some of the surprising and not-so-surprising statistics covering a range of driving situations during the holidays — office parties to New's Years and Uber to marijuana use while driving. A few key numbers from the company's latest survey: 67 percent of Americans said they feel less safe on the road during the holiday season. And 23 percent of those who responded to the survey admit to drinking more alcohol during the holiday season than they do during other times of the year. “The unfortunate reality is that every year come holiday time, there’s more drinking, and there’s more drinking and driving—which leads to more accidents and more deaths,” said Adams, a safety and education analyst. “The solution is actually simple: if you’re drinking, arrange for someone else to drive or call for an Uber, Lyft or taxi. Period. Any death caused by drinking and driving is a death that was entirely preventable.” The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform: Google Play iTunes Spotify Stitcher The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Welcome to another episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. In this week's two-part presentation, we recap the recently concluded LA Auto Show and we discuss drivers' habits during the holidays with Laura Adams of DriversEd.com. DriversEd.com.
As the first major auto show of the year, the LA Auto Show is always chock-full of innovation. This year was no different. Two concept vehicles, Byton and Rivian, both soon scheduled for their public debuts, attracted a lot of attention.

The Rivian concept is an all-electric SUV with 0-60 mph speed in 3.0 seconds and a 400-mile range. The new company also has an all-electric pickup. Image © James Raia/2018.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the Byton and its building reputation as a potential rival for Tesla. And we also exchange ideas on Rivian. It plans on debuting the first electric pick-up truck as well as an SUV with the next year. The Rivian models are being touted with 0-60 mph acceleration in 3.0 second and in higher-priced trims with respective ranges of 400 miles.In the second half go the episode, Bruce and James  discuss with Adams the results of the online driving school's recent survey drivers' habits during the holiday season.
A repeat guest, Adams is a statistical whirlwind. We discuss some of the surprising and not-so-surprising statistics covering a range of driving situations during the holidays — office parties to New's Years and Uber to marijuana use while driving.
A few key numbers from the company's latest survey: 67 percent of Americans said they feel less safe on the road during the holiday season. And 23 percent of those who responded to the survey admit to drinking more alcohol during the holiday season than they do during other times of the year.
“The unfortunate reality is that every year come holiday time, there’s more drinking, and there’s more drinking and driving—which leads to more accidents and more deaths,” said Adams, a safety and education analyst. “The solution is actually simple: if you’re drinking, arrange for someone else to drive or call for an Uber, Lyft or taxi. Period. Any death caused by drinking and driving is a death that was entirely preventable.”
The Weekly Driver encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friend and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts.
Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com.
All episodes of the podcast are archived on www.theweeklydriver.com/podcast
Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform:
Google Play
iTunes
Spotify
Stitcher
The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 33:01
Episode 63, LA Auto Show, Day 3: Genesis, Rivian https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/11/episode-63-la-auto-show-day-3-genesis-rivian/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-63-la-auto-show-day-3-genesis-rivian Sat, 01 Dec 2018 02:29:13 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30623 Day 3 of the LA Auto Show was the last of the Media Days. The public show opened its 10-day run today (Nov. 30) and will continue through Dec. 9. A handful of vehicles attracted a vast amount of attention, and representatives of two of those companies are our guests on Episode #63 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. The Rivian Concept pick-up truck and SUV are potential competitors for Tesla and were featured at the LA Auto Show. Images © James Raia/2018 Bruce Aldrich produced the show remotely from interviews I had from the show. Our guests are Kevin Smith, a Senior Group Manager of Public Relations and Corporate Social Responsibility for Genesis, and Sethu Gopal, Senior Director of Connected Car and Digital Experience for Rivian. A third guest, a communications director for Polaris, did not make his scheduled interview. A huge sign on the front of Los Angeles Convention announced the 2019 Genesis G70 as the MotorTrend Car of the Year. The entry-level luxury sedan has received several honors and it's likely to receive several more. Smith and I discuss the reasons for the debut vehicle's success. He provides details of the two additional sedans in the Genesis lineup and plans for the now three-year-old brand's future vehicles. Rivian, the concept all-electric pick-up truck and sport utility vehicle, has often been touted as a pending competitor to Tesla. The company was founded nearly 10 years ago by Mainstream Motors in Florida. Its name was changed to Avera and now Rivian. It has two concepts at the LA Auto Show, the R1T pickup truck and R1S SUV. Gopal discusses the company's plans for the production of the vehicle. He also details some of the specs for the uniquely designed machines — a 400-plus mile range, 0-60 miles per hour times in 3.0 seconds and 11,000-pound towing capacities. Revisit our earlier podcasts from this year's LA Auto Show via the links below: Day 1: Byton Concept, Airstream Day 2: Cadillac, Baja 1000, Prestone In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes. All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues and reposting on social media platforms. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Day 3 of the LA Auto Show was the last of the Media Days. The public show opened its 10-day run today (Nov. 30) and will continue through Dec. 9. - A handful of vehicles attracted a vast amount of attention,
A handful of vehicles attracted a vast amount of attention, and representatives of two of those companies are our guests on Episode #63 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

The Rivian Concept pick-up truck and SUV are potential competitors for Tesla and were featured at the LA Auto Show. Images © James Raia/2018

Bruce Aldrich produced the show remotely from interviews I had from the show. Our guests are Kevin Smith, a Senior Group Manager of Public Relations and Corporate Social Responsibility for Genesis, and Sethu Gopal, Senior Director of Connected Car and Digital Experience for Rivian.

A third guest, a communications director for Polaris, did not make his scheduled interview.

A huge sign on the front of Los Angeles Convention announced the 2019 Genesis G70 as the MotorTrend Car of the Year. The entry-level luxury sedan has received several honors and it's likely to receive several more.

Smith and I discuss the reasons for the debut vehicle's success. He provides details of the two additional sedans in the Genesis lineup and plans for the now three-year-old brand's future vehicles.

Rivian, the concept all-electric pick-up truck and sport utility vehicle, has often been touted as a pending competitor to Tesla.

The company was founded nearly 10 years ago by Mainstream Motors in Florida. Its name was changed to Avera and now Rivian. It has two concepts at the LA Auto Show, the R1T pickup truck and R1S SUV.

Gopal discusses the company's plans for the production of the vehicle. He also details some of the specs for the uniquely designed machines — a 400-plus mile range, 0-60 miles per hour times in 3.0 seconds and 11,000-pound towing capacities.

Revisit our earlier podcasts from this year's LA Auto Show via the links below:

Day 1: Byton Concept, Airstream

Day 2: Cadillac, Baja 1000, Prestone

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes.

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues and reposting on social media platforms.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 18:49
#62, LA Auto Show, Day 2: Cadillac SUV, Baja 1000, Prestone https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/11/62-la-auto-show-day-2-cadillac-suv-baja-1000-prestone/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=62-la-auto-show-day-2-cadillac-suv-baja-1000-prestone Thu, 29 Nov 2018 05:40:57 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30611 Welcome to Day 2 of The Weekly Driver Podcast's special coverage of AutoMobility LA and the LA Auto Show. Today (Nov. 28) was the opening day for media previews of new car debuts, and it didn't disappoint. While co-host Bruce Aldrich produced Episode No. 62 remotely, James Raia (your other co-host) was reporting from the showroom halls of the Los Angeles Convention Center. Cadillac showcased its new SUV, the XT4, at LA Auto Show. Image © James Raia/2018. We have three guests. Phil Zak is the exterior designer for Cadillac. He explains the enduring brand's continuing transition into the SUV segment, particularly the new XT4. We also discuss Cadillac's continuing pursuit to appeal to younger buyers. And we also talk about the recent announcement of GM's decision to shut down several production plants and discontinue a half-dozen cars, including two Cadillac models. Our second guest is Josh McGuckin. With a team of more than 20 people and a co-driver, McGuckin completed the Baja 1,000 in 2017 and plans to do it again next year. The Volkswagen Beetle McGuckin's drove in the event was part of the homage to Volkswagen in the Technology Pavillion during AutoMobility LA. Several dozen vintage VW Beetles were on display during Beetles & Breakfast, a celebration of the iconic brand. The 2019 model is the last production year for the Beetle. And in the closing segment, The Weekly Driver Podcast talks with Steven Clancy, the president of Prestone. It's the more than 90-year company famous for its anti-freeze and coolant. Clancy and I discuss the company's new product and how the company has adapted to new needs in the automotive industry. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes. All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues and reposting on social media platforms. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Welcome to Day 2 of The Weekly Driver Podcast's special coverage of AutoMobility LA and the LA Auto Show. - Today (Nov. 28) was the opening day for media previews of new car debuts, and it didn't disappoint.
Today (Nov. 28) was the opening day for media previews of new car debuts, and it didn't disappoint. While co-host Bruce Aldrich produced Episode No. 62 remotely, James Raia (your other co-host) was reporting from the showroom halls of the Los Angeles Convention Center.

Cadillac showcased its new SUV, the XT4, at LA Auto Show. Image © James Raia/2018.

We have three guests. Phil Zak is the exterior designer for Cadillac. He explains the enduring brand's continuing transition into the SUV segment, particularly the new XT4. We also discuss Cadillac's continuing pursuit to appeal to younger buyers. And we also talk about the recent announcement of GM's decision to shut down several production plants and discontinue a half-dozen cars, including two Cadillac models.

Our second guest is Josh McGuckin. With a team of more than 20 people and a co-driver, McGuckin completed the Baja 1,000 in 2017 and plans to do it again next year. The Volkswagen Beetle McGuckin's drove in the event was part of the homage to Volkswagen in the Technology Pavillion during AutoMobility LA.

Several dozen vintage VW Beetles were on display during Beetles & Breakfast, a celebration of the iconic brand. The 2019 model is the last production year for the Beetle.

And in the closing segment, The Weekly Driver Podcast talks with Steven Clancy, the president of Prestone. It's the more than 90-year company famous for its anti-freeze and coolant.

Clancy and I discuss the company's new product and how the company has adapted to new needs in the automotive industry.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes.

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues and reposting on social media platforms.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 28:59
#61, LA Auto Show, Day 1: Byton concept, new Airstream https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/11/61-la-auto-show-day-1-byton-concept-new-airstream/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=61-la-auto-show-day-1-byton-concept-new-airstream Wed, 28 Nov 2018 21:43:00 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30603 Welcome to our special podcast episodes from AutoMobility LA and the Los Angeles Auto Show. For the past few years, AutoMobility LA has showcased the ever-advancing technology in the automotive world. Our first episode is direct from the technology tent on the eve of the opening day of the traditional show. The Byton concept SUV has a 49-inch touchscreen interface. Image © James Raia/2018 Co-host Bruce Aldrich is producing the show remotely, but James Raia (that's me) will be reporting live from the showroom floor for three days. We'll start with two diverse guests, Florian Bauer from the concept electric vehicle Byton and Jeremy Levi, a sales consultant for Airstream. Bauer is director of product management for Byton. It's considered a pending top competitor for Tesla and it's about year from its debut in China, where its financial backing is located. If Byton's future advances as planned, the M-Byte crossover and E-Byte sedan will debut to the American public via its U.S. base in Santa Clara, California in June 2020. Bauer and I discuss the unique Byton features. With an advertised base price of $45,000, the Byton is marketed for drivers and passenger to operate the vehicle or controls some of its features with Amazon Alexa voice commands or hand gestures. The command operation is a touchscreen that extends the entire length of the dash. It’s 49 inches long and 10 inches high. The seats in the spacious SUV swivel so passengers can face each other. Levi discusses the new fully connected Airstream Classic. With all-new Smart Control Technology, the Airstream Classic’s most important features and amenities can be monitored and controlled from anywhere. Travelers can stay connected to the comforts of home, even when far from it. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes. All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues and reposting on social media platforms. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Welcome to our special podcast episodes from AutoMobility LA and the Los Angeles Auto Show. - For the past few years, AutoMobility LA has showcased the ever-advancing technology in the automotive world. Our first episode is direct from the technology ...
For the past few years, AutoMobility LA has showcased the ever-advancing technology in the automotive world. Our first episode is direct from the technology tent on the eve of the opening day of the traditional show.

The Byton concept SUV has a 49-inch touchscreen interface. Image © James Raia/2018

Co-host Bruce Aldrich is producing the show remotely, but James Raia (that's me) will be reporting live from the showroom floor for three days. We'll start with two diverse guests, Florian Bauer from the concept electric vehicle Byton and Jeremy Levi, a sales consultant for Airstream.

Bauer is director of product management for Byton. It's considered a pending top competitor for Tesla and it's about year from its debut in China, where its financial backing is located.

If Byton's future advances as planned, the M-Byte crossover and E-Byte sedan will debut to the American public via its U.S. base in Santa Clara, California in June 2020.

Bauer and I discuss the unique Byton features. With an advertised base price of $45,000, the Byton is marketed for drivers and passenger to operate the vehicle or controls some of its features with Amazon Alexa voice commands or hand gestures.

The command operation is a touchscreen that extends the entire length of the dash. It’s 49 inches long and 10 inches high. The seats in the spacious SUV swivel so passengers can face each other.

Levi discusses the new fully connected Airstream Classic. With all-new Smart Control Technology, the Airstream Classic’s most important features and amenities can be monitored and controlled from anywhere. Travelers can stay connected to the comforts of home, even when far from it.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes.

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues and reposting on social media platforms.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 22:20
#60, Bay Area tow truck driver videos interstate idiots https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/11/60-bay-area-tow-truck-driver-videos-interstate-idiots/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=60-bay-area-tow-truck-driver-videos-interstate-idiots Sat, 24 Nov 2018 06:27:18 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30459 Ray Elliott of Los Gatos, California has been a tow truck driver in the Silicon Valley for more 20 years. He witnesses stupidity on the freeway daily. Elliott has arrived on the scene of every kind of accident imaginable, sometimes before law enforcement personnel or first responders. He has seen fender benders and death. Ray Elliott, a veteran tow truck driver in the San Francisco Bay Area, filming the accident in which he's about to be involved. Video image courtesy of Ray Elliott. As a former paramedic, Elliott has helped saved lives at accidents. He's seen so much go wrong, he decided years ago to document much of his daily work life on a website titled. idiotsontheinterstate.com. Elliott is our guest on Episode #60 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Elliott his website and its varied video content. The videos are raw and done with Elliott's smartphone. Elliott's opinions often criticize the poor habits of drivers, the public to police officers. Some of the videos are less than one minute in length. Other videos last several minutes. One video shows Elliott's tow truck colliding with a van after the latter makes an illegal right-hand turn. Elliott's reaction is "priceless." The story behind the accident is explained in the podcast episode. The Weekly Driver Podcast became aware of Elliott when he sent me a letter after reading one of my Sunday columns in the San Jose Mercury. The letter began: "I am a exceptionally experienced tow truck driver in Silicon Valley, and I am the publisher of the website idiotsontheinterstate.com. I see and write about all the crappy engineering that comes my way every day." In another section, while commenting on the smart keys/fobs, electric brakes and the overall poor quality of engineering, Elliott wrote: "I could go on and on about the piss-poor engineering I see on a daily basis.  Much of it actually can endanger my life.  I have to figure out how to disengage or override theses gizmos in the most dangerous of situations in the most dangerous places. Things that were once simple are now overly complicated and can become very dangerous for both me, the tow driver, and the occupants of the vehicle." Elliott doesn't have advertising on his website. He said he created the site as a public service. And it also provides a way for a veteran tow truck driver to vent. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes. All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues and reposting on social media platforms. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Ray Elliott of Los Gatos, California has been a tow truck driver in the Silicon Valley for more 20 years. He witnesses stupidity on the freeway daily. - Elliott has arrived on the scene of every kind of accident imaginable,
Elliott has arrived on the scene of every kind of accident imaginable, sometimes before law enforcement personnel or first responders. He has seen fender benders and death.

Ray Elliott, a veteran tow truck driver in the San Francisco Bay Area, filming the accident in which he's about to be involved. Video image courtesy of Ray Elliott.

As a former paramedic, Elliott has helped saved lives at accidents. He's seen so much go wrong, he decided years ago to document much of his daily work life on a website titled. idiotsontheinterstate.com.

Elliott is our guest on Episode #60 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Elliott his website and its varied video content. The videos are raw and done with Elliott's smartphone.

Elliott's opinions often criticize the poor habits of drivers, the public to police officers. Some of the videos are less than one minute in length. Other videos last several minutes.

One video shows Elliott's tow truck colliding with a van after the latter makes an illegal right-hand turn. Elliott's reaction is "priceless." The story behind the accident is explained in the podcast episode.

The Weekly Driver Podcast became aware of Elliott when he sent me a letter after reading one of my Sunday columns in the San Jose Mercury.

The letter began:

"I am a exceptionally experienced tow truck driver in Silicon Valley, and I am the publisher of the website idiotsontheinterstate.com. I see and write about all the crappy engineering that comes my way every day."

In another section, while commenting on the smart keys/fobs, electric brakes and the overall poor quality of engineering, Elliott wrote:

"I could go on and on about the piss-poor engineering I see on a daily basis.  Much of it actually can endanger my life.  I have to figure out how to disengage or override theses gizmos in the most dangerous of situations in the most dangerous places. Things that were once simple are now overly complicated and can become very dangerous for both me, the tow driver, and the occupants of the vehicle."

Elliott doesn't have advertising on his website. He said he created the site as a public service. And it also provides a way for a veteran tow truck driver to vent.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes.

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues and reposting on social media platforms.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 26:36
#59, Technology, Chinese influence on tap for LA Auto Show https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/11/59-technology-chinese-influence-on-tap-for-la-auto-show/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=59-technology-chinese-influence-on-tap-for-la-auto-show Fri, 16 Nov 2018 06:33:47 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30412 The LA Auto Show began more 100 years ago and it's always changed with trends in the automotive industry — pick-up trucks to alternative fuel vehicles. This year's show, scheduled Nov. 29-Dec. 10 at the Los Angeles Convention Center, will be no different. More than 60 vehicles are confirmed to make their North American or global debuts. Manufacturer specialists, once known as Sirens, are an enduring tradition of the LA Auto Show. Lefteris "Lefty" Tsironis, the show's marketing and communications director, is our guest on episode #59 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Tsironis takes co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia through the show, concepts to the increase of Chinese manufacturers to the enduring tradition of manufacturers' ambassadors, once known as sirens. One of the most prominent components of the industry — the advancing importance of technology in the industry — will be the focus of AutoMobility LA. It's the preceding press and trade portion of the show, beginning Nov. 26. Manufacturers' continued emphasis on technology, autonomous driving and alternative fuel vehicles will be feature in the the four-day show. Toyota plans to launch five new vehicles, including special editions and hybrid models. Volkswagen has confirmed both global and North American unveilings, including an electric concept and GTI and Beetle special editions. Toyota is launching five new vehicles, including hybrid and special edition models. Subaru will also have multiple introductions, including a plug-in hybrid. Hyundai, Jeep, Kia, Nissan, Porsche, Volvo and several other marques have confirmed model introductions for AutoMobility LA. Carmakers debuting vehicles at AutoMobility LA will also have their new vehicles available during the public show. Tickets, parking availability, confirmed manufacturers and other details of the show are available via the web site, www.laautoshow.com. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes. All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues and reposting on social media platforms. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. The LA Auto Show began more 100 years ago and it's always changed with trends in the automotive industry — pick-up trucks to alternative fuel vehicles. - This year's show, scheduled Nov. 29-Dec. 10 at the Los Angeles Convention Center,
This year's show, scheduled Nov. 29-Dec. 10 at the Los Angeles Convention Center, will be no different. More than 60 vehicles are confirmed to make their North American or global debuts.

Manufacturer specialists, once known as Sirens, are an enduring tradition of the LA Auto Show.

Lefteris "Lefty" Tsironis, the show's marketing and communications director, is our guest on episode #59 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Tsironis takes co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia through the show, concepts to the increase of Chinese manufacturers to the enduring tradition of manufacturers' ambassadors, once known as sirens.

One of the most prominent components of the industry — the advancing importance of technology in the industry — will be the focus of AutoMobility LA. It's the preceding press and trade portion of the show, beginning Nov. 26.

Manufacturers' continued emphasis on technology, autonomous driving and alternative fuel vehicles will be feature in the the four-day show.

Toyota plans to launch five new vehicles, including special editions and hybrid models.

Volkswagen has confirmed both global and North American unveilings, including an electric concept and GTI and Beetle special editions. Toyota is launching five new vehicles, including hybrid and special edition models. Subaru will also have multiple introductions, including a plug-in hybrid.

Hyundai, Jeep, Kia, Nissan, Porsche, Volvo and several other marques have confirmed model introductions for AutoMobility LA. Carmakers debuting vehicles at AutoMobility LA will also have their new vehicles available during the public show.

Tickets, parking availability, confirmed manufacturers and other details of the show are available via the web site, www.laautoshow.com.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes.

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues and reposting on social media platforms.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 35:58
#58 Consumer Reports’ expert discusses reliability survey https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/11/58-consumer-reports-expert-discusses-reliability-survey/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=58-consumer-reports-expert-discusses-reliability-survey Thu, 08 Nov 2018 19:03:41 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30388 Mike Quincy is an expert among car experts. For nearly 20 years, he's purchased, driven and evaluated cars for Consumer Reports. The well-respected magazine and website has tested vehicles for decades, and it's considered the automotive industry's most objective resource. Lexus took the top spot in the 2018 Consumer Reports' reliability survey. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2018 Mike is our guest on episode #58 of The Weekly Driver podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Mike the publication's recently released Most Reliable and Least Reliable vehicle lists for 2018. As Mike details, Consumer Reports purchases all of its test vehicles. The publication’s annual reliability survey analyzes data in 17 areas from more than 500,000 vehicles. Areas for potential problems include interior wear-and-tear, transmission repairs and squeaky brakes. Predictable results occur in the survey, so do surprises. Volvo was the least reliable car in this year's tabulations. The reason: The Swedish-made, Chinese-owned manufacturer dropped six places from last year and had an average reliability score of 22. Tesla, which dropped six positions in the survey, had an average score of 32. The Model S had a below-average rating following suspension problems and a door handle issue. This year, Toyota and its luxury sibling Lexus, reversed positions. Lexus got the top spot, with a reliability score of 78 and had six models in the study. In addition to Consumer Reports’ results, Mike also shares with us his personal opinions about his favorite and not-so-favorite vehicles. And he also answers the question Consumer Reports receives more than any other inquiry. He tells us what happens to the vehicles after they’re evaluated. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues and reposting on social media platforms. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Mike Quincy is an expert among car experts. For nearly 20 years, he's purchased, driven and evaluated cars for Consumer Reports. - The well-respected magazine and website has tested vehicles for decades, and it's considered the automotive industry's m...
The well-respected magazine and website has tested vehicles for decades, and it's considered the automotive industry's most objective resource.

Lexus took the top spot in the 2018 Consumer Reports' reliability survey. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2018

Mike is our guest on episode #58 of The Weekly Driver podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Mike the publication's recently released Most Reliable and Least Reliable vehicle lists for 2018.

As Mike details, Consumer Reports purchases all of its test vehicles. The publication’s annual reliability survey analyzes data in 17 areas from more than 500,000 vehicles. Areas for potential problems include interior wear-and-tear, transmission repairs and squeaky brakes.

Predictable results occur in the survey, so do surprises.

Volvo was the least reliable car in this year's tabulations. The reason: The Swedish-made, Chinese-owned manufacturer dropped six places from last year and had an average reliability score of 22.

Tesla, which dropped six positions in the survey, had an average score of 32. The Model S had a below-average rating following suspension problems and a door handle issue.

This year, Toyota and its luxury sibling Lexus, reversed positions. Lexus got the top spot, with a reliability score of 78 and had six models in the study.

In addition to Consumer Reports’ results, Mike also shares with us his personal opinions about his favorite and not-so-favorite vehicles.

And he also answers the question Consumer Reports receives more than any other inquiry. He tells us what happens to the vehicles after they’re evaluated.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues and reposting on social media platforms.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 33:31
#57, Jeep gets depreciation honors, Nissan Leaf falls https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/11/57-jeep-gets-depreciation-honors-nissan-leaf-falls/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=57-jeep-gets-depreciation-honors-nissan-leaf-falls Mon, 05 Nov 2018 20:54:08 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30369 Depreciation isn't often the top priority for car buyers, but it's particularly important for consumers who keep their cars for many years. The online automotive search engine iSeeCars.com recently released its survey of vehicles with the most and least depreciation. The site analyzed more than 4.3 million new and used vehicles to identify models with the lowest and highest depreciation after five years. The Jeep Wrangler and Jeep Wrangler Limited shared top honors in the recent iSeeCars.com survey as the vehicles with the least depreciation after five years of ownership, tying with 27.3 percent. Julie Blackley, communications manager for iSeecars.com, is our guest on episode #57 of TheWeeklyDriver podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Blackley the trends of the survey's data, including result variance in different geographical areas of the country. According to iSeeCars.com, sport utility vehicle and trucks retain the most value after five years of ownership. Electric vehicles and luxury sedans depreciate the most. "While the average new vehicle loses 50.2 percent of its value after five years, some vehicles retain more of their value and depreciate less than average,” said iSeeCars CEO Phong Ly. “For consumers who buy new vehicles and sell them around the five-year mark, choosing a model that retains the most value is a smart economic decision.” The Jeep Wrangler Unlimited and Jeep Wrangler shared top honors, both with a depreciation of 27.3 percent after five years of ownership. The Nissan Leaf has the worst depreciation after five years of ownership, 71.7 percent. The average depreciation among all major manufacturers after five years is 50.2 percent. To read the complete list, visit iseecars.com. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. Social media sharing is appreciated. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.     Depreciation isn't often the top priority for car buyers, but it's particularly important for consumers who keep their cars for many years. The online automotive search engine iSeeCars.com recently released its survey of vehicles with the most and leas...
The site analyzed more than 4.3 million new and used vehicles to identify models with the lowest and highest depreciation after five years.

The Jeep Wrangler and Jeep Wrangler Limited shared top honors in the recent iSeeCars.com survey as the vehicles with the least depreciation after five years of ownership, tying with 27.3 percent.

Julie Blackley, communications manager for iSeecars.com, is our guest on episode #57 of TheWeeklyDriver podcast.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Blackley the trends of the survey's data, including result variance in different geographical areas of the country.

According to iSeeCars.com, sport utility vehicle and trucks retain the most value after five years of ownership. Electric vehicles and luxury sedans depreciate the most.

"While the average new vehicle loses 50.2 percent of its value after five years, some vehicles retain more of their value and depreciate less than average,” said iSeeCars CEO Phong Ly. “For consumers who buy new vehicles and sell them around the five-year mark, choosing a model that retains the most value is a smart economic decision.”

The Jeep Wrangler Unlimited and Jeep Wrangler shared top honors, both with a depreciation of 27.3 percent after five years of ownership. The Nissan Leaf has the worst depreciation after five years of ownership, 71.7 percent.

The average depreciation among all major manufacturers after five years is 50.2 percent.

To read the complete list, visit iseecars.com.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.
We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. Social media sharing is appreciated.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.

 

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 27:29
56, Distracted driving now includes ‘Netflixiing’ https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/10/56-distracted-driving-now-includes-netflixiing/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=56-distracted-driving-now-includes-netflixiing Tue, 16 Oct 2018 18:21:02 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30329 Laura Adams knows as much as about distracted driving as anyone. But her knowledge isn’t from experiences as a driver or passenger. She’s as an analyst who studies statistics and is shocked at what the numbers reveal. Adams, based in Austin, Texas, works for DriversEd.com. The online driving school and driving safety resource headquartered in Oakland recently released the results of its inaugural initiative detailing drivers’ habits. Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview Laura in the week’s episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), distracted driving “Is any activity that diverts attention from driving, including talking or texting on your phone, eating and drinking, talking to people in your vehicle, fiddling with the stereo, entertainment or navigation system. It’s anything that takes your attention away from the task of safe driving.” DriversEd.com’s survey analyzed the results more than 1,400 survey respondents and detailed the behavior of drivers — from texting to drinking to YouTube to Snapchat viewing to using marijuana. The results showed 73 percent of drivers admit to reading text messages driving and 54 percent admit to typing text messages while driving. About 39 percent of drivers said that while driving, they check and use their phone more often than they probably should. “Some of what’s going on behind the wheel is old-fashioned,” said Adams. “But some of it is related to technology. The big takeaway for me is texting. We know people are texting. We see it all the time. Maybe we’re even doing it. “But the numbers are pretty high and when we asked people if they thought they were using their phones more than they should and 39 percent said yes but they haven’t changed their behaviors.” In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Laura Adams knows as much as about distracted driving as anyone. But her knowledge isn’t from experiences as a driver or passenger. She’s as an analyst who studies statistics and is shocked at what the numbers reveal. - Adams, based in Austin, Texas,
Adams, based in Austin, Texas, works for DriversEd.com. The online driving school and driving safety resource headquartered in Oakland recently released the results of its inaugural initiative detailing drivers’ habits.

Bruce Aldrich and James Raia interview Laura in the week’s episode of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), distracted driving “Is any activity that diverts attention from driving, including talking or texting on your phone, eating and drinking, talking to people in your vehicle, fiddling with the stereo, entertainment or navigation system. It’s anything that takes your attention away from the task of safe driving.”

DriversEd.com’s survey analyzed the results more than 1,400 survey respondents and detailed the behavior of drivers — from texting to drinking to YouTube to Snapchat viewing to using marijuana.

The results showed 73 percent of drivers admit to reading text messages driving and 54 percent admit to typing text messages while driving. About 39 percent of drivers said that while driving, they check and use their phone more often than they probably should.

“Some of what’s going on behind the wheel is old-fashioned,” said Adams. “But some of it is related to technology. The big takeaway for me is texting. We know people are texting. We see it all the time. Maybe we’re even doing it.

“But the numbers are pretty high and when we asked people if they thought they were using their phones more than they should and 39 percent said yes but they haven’t changed their behaviors.”

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail
All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.
We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.
The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 26:49
55, Farewell manual transmissions except in collectibles https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/10/55-farewell-manual-transmissions-except-in-collectibles/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=55-farewell-manual-transmissions-except-in-collectibles Fri, 12 Oct 2018 17:23:13 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30318 Chris Warren, sales manager for Premier Financial Services in Florida, knows the vintage car market well. He works for the prominent national company that for more than 20 years has provided financing for previously owned exotic, vintage and luxury cars. What Warren has observed is an increasing renaissance among purists who want to buy vehicles with manual transmissions. New vehicles with manual transmissions are more difficult to purchase and are more desirable in vintage exotic cars. Warren is our guest on Episode 55 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the automotive industry and the increasing lack of manual transmissions in new vehicles and the increasing importance of manual transmissions in collectible cars. “It's interesting with the advent of clutchless transmissions and all of that in modern car times that purists are seeking a manual gearbox,” said Warren. “We find that the renaissance back to that and the love of it is something that fuels that classic market.” Warren uses a family story as an example of the changing industry: “My oldest nephew is now a junior in college, but when he was learning to drive, my sister made an effort to try and find a new car with a manual gearbox for him to learn to drive on,” said Warren. “That's what we learned to drive on back in the '60s. “Those cars are just really hard to get. We see people who may be inclined to purchase a newer car, but because they have a specific love for a manual transmission, they move to the vintage market. If I were to close my eyes and think about cars I know that are current year model cars available with manual transmissions, I'd struggle to think that's it even four percent.” Warren also relates the popular brands among his clients, Lamborghini, McLaren and Ferrari, are now all equipped with automatic clutches. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.   Chris Warren, sales manager for Premier Financial Services in Florida, knows the vintage car market well. He works for the prominent national company that for more than 20 years has provided financing for previously owned exotic,
What Warren has observed is an increasing renaissance among purists who want to buy vehicles with manual transmissions.

New vehicles with manual transmissions are more difficult to purchase and are more desirable in vintage exotic cars.

Warren is our guest on Episode 55 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the automotive industry and the increasing lack of manual transmissions in new vehicles and the increasing importance of manual transmissions in collectible cars.

“It's interesting with the advent of clutchless transmissions and all of that in modern car times that purists are seeking a manual gearbox,” said Warren. “We find that the renaissance back to that and the love of it is something that fuels that classic market.”

Warren uses a family story as an example of the changing industry:

“My oldest nephew is now a junior in college, but when he was learning to drive, my sister made an effort to try and find a new car with a manual gearbox for him to learn to drive on,” said Warren. “That's what we learned to drive on back in the '60s.

“Those cars are just really hard to get. We see people who may be inclined to purchase a newer car, but because they have a specific love for a manual transmission, they move to the vintage market. If I were to close my eyes and think about cars I know that are current year model cars available with manual transmissions, I'd struggle to think that's it even four percent.”

Warren also relates the popular brands among his clients, Lamborghini, McLaren and Ferrari, are now all equipped with automatic clutches.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.
We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 26:45
#54, Sacramento designer digs her 1986 Jeep Wagoneer https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/09/54-sacramento-designer-digs-her-1986-jeep-wagoneer/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=54-sacramento-designer-digs-her-1986-jeep-wagoneer Wed, 26 Sep 2018 01:59:50 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30259 Kerrie Kelly knows style. She owns a design company and works in a home office worthy of recognition in an upscale home decor magazine. Kelly also knows what style she likes in her automobiles. She and her husband own a BMW sedan, but it's a 1986 Chrysler Jeep Wagoneer she prefers to drive. The Sacramento businesswoman, formerly employed by fashion mogul Ralph Lauren, is our guest on Episode #54 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Kerrie Kelly of Sacramento owns a BMW sedan with her husband. But she prefers driving a 1986 Jeep Wagoneer. Images © Bruce Aldich/2018 and courtesy of Kerrie Kelly. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss Kelly's passion for her 32-year Jeep Wagoneer, and what she and her husband did to renovate the vehicle. We hear the story of how the couple bought the wagon and where they've driven it. Introduced in 1962, the Jeep Wagoneer was marketed as the first luxury 4x4 station wagon by Jeep and several other automakers. It became the first sport utility vehicle when Jeep used the term for the 1974 Jeep Cherokee version. With an almost unchanged body style for 29 years until its demise in 1991, the Jeep Wagoneer is the third longest-produced single generation car in U.S. automotive history. "When I worked for Ralph Lauren Home Collectio and is so many of the ads they used the navy blue Jeep Wagoneer with the back open, the dog the blanket," explains Kelly. "They used all of those design elements, and I've always been drawn to it." In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail and all major podcast flatforms. All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues as well as posting the links on your social media platforms. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Kerrie Kelly knows style. She owns a design company and works in a home office worthy of recognition in an upscale home decor magazine. Kelly also knows what style she likes in her automobiles. She and her husband own a BMW sedan,
The Sacramento businesswoman, formerly employed by fashion mogul Ralph Lauren, is our guest on Episode #54 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Kerrie Kelly of Sacramento owns a BMW sedan with her husband. But she prefers driving a 1986 Jeep Wagoneer. Images © Bruce Aldich/2018 and courtesy of Kerrie Kelly.







Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss Kelly's passion for her 32-year Jeep Wagoneer, and what she and her husband did to renovate the vehicle. We hear the story of how the couple bought the wagon and where they've driven it.

Introduced in 1962, the Jeep Wagoneer was marketed as the first luxury 4x4 station wagon by Jeep and several other automakers. It became the first sport utility vehicle when Jeep used the term for the 1974 Jeep Cherokee version.

With an almost unchanged body style for 29 years until its demise in 1991, the Jeep Wagoneer is the third longest-produced single generation car in U.S. automotive history.

"When I worked for Ralph Lauren Home Collectio and is so many of the ads they used the navy blue Jeep Wagoneer with the back open, the dog the blanket," explains Kelly. "They used all of those design elements, and I've always been drawn to it."

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail and all major podcast flatforms.

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.
We welcome your comments and episode suggestions.

Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues as well as posting the links on your social media platforms.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 25:34
Episode 53, New cars ‘mobile attack spaces on wheels’ https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/09/episode-53-new-cars-mobile-attack-spaces-on-wheels/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-53-new-cars-mobile-attack-spaces-on-wheels Tue, 18 Sep 2018 20:17:04 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30248 Steve Povolny is head of the Advanced Threat Research Lab at McAfee in Hillsboro, Oregon. He's not a fearmonger, but he has concerns about the increasing dilemma of cyber attacks on vehicles. Povolony, who uses the term "mobile attack space on wheels" to discuss the predicament, is our guest on episode #53 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Vehicle cyber attacks are an increasing concern. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the quickly evolving and potentially catastrophic phenomenon in a wide-ranging session. Povolny doesn't speak with a suggestion of an imminent driving apocalypse, but consider his opening remarks: "In the last few years alone, we've seen a pretty significant move in the attack surface for vehicles. Pretty much every new vehicle that comes out on the market now for the last has some kind of 'smart' capabilities or features." "And certainly many of them have a network component to them. If you're a Tesla owner, instead of your key, you use your key to remote start, or the unlock the doors and pretty much every other feature." "What we have seen is that as more new vehicles come on to the market and they contain additional smart features and great pieces of technology, those do come with a pretty heavy security concern." In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. Steve Povolny is head of the Advanced Threat Research Lab at McAfee in Hillsboro, Oregon. He's not a fearmonger, but he has concerns about the increasing dilemma of cyber attacks on vehicles. - Povolony, who uses the term "mobile attack space on wheel...
Povolony, who uses the term "mobile attack space on wheels" to discuss the predicament, is our guest on episode #53 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Vehicle cyber attacks are an increasing concern.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the quickly evolving and potentially catastrophic phenomenon in a wide-ranging session. Povolny doesn't speak with a suggestion of an imminent driving apocalypse, but consider his opening remarks:

"In the last few years alone, we've seen a pretty significant move in the attack surface for vehicles. Pretty much every new vehicle that comes out on the market now for the last has some kind of 'smart' capabilities or features."

"And certainly many of them have a network component to them. If you're a Tesla owner, instead of your key, you use your key to remote start, or the unlock the doors and pretty much every other feature."

"What we have seen is that as more new vehicles come on to the market and they contain additional smart features and great pieces of technology, those do come with a pretty heavy security concern."

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.
We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 21:03
Episode 52, Car driver Joey Hand talks racing, family https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/09/episode-52-car-driver-joey-hand-talks-racing-family/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-52-car-driver-joey-hand-talks-racing-family Wed, 05 Sep 2018 18:20:09 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30213 Joey Hand is among the country's most versatile race car drivers. He's competed as a solo driver on more than a half-dozen series through the years, the American LeMans Series to Formula BMW and Toyota Atlantic to Star Mazda. Like his father, Hand began his career in kart racing. Hand's son is now the family's third generation in racing and is also involved in kart racing. Sacramento race car driver Joey Hand will compete Sept. 7-9 at WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca. Hand, 39, from Sacramento, currently a Ford Factory driver, is our guest on Episode 52 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Hand his versatile victories in the 24-Hour of LeMans, Rolex 24 at Daytona and 12 Hours of Sebring. We also discuss Hand's current successful season and the season-ending finale. In what he describes as his home race course, Hand will race Sept. 7-9 in the IMSA Weather Tech SportsCar Championship series at Laguna Seca Raceway in Salinas. He’s currently in third place in the standings. When he's not competing, Hand’s supports his son Chase (age 11) when he races throughout the West Coast. Joey Hand is also an Internet phenomenon. A video showing his car crash and repeated flips during a 2006 race in Lexington, Kentucky, is viral. It’s often referenced when Hand, who suffered no major injuries in the crash, meets fans at races. Hand also discusses raising his son during the podcast episode, details participating at the highest levels of racing and discusses endurance racing when a vehicle has multiple drivers. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.offtrack.net Joey Hand is among the country's most versatile race car drivers. He's competed as a solo driver on more than a half-dozen series through the years, the American LeMans Series to Formula BMW and Toyota Atlantic to Star Mazda. - Like his father,
Like his father, Hand began his career in kart racing. Hand's son is now the family's third generation in racing and is also involved in kart racing.

Sacramento race car driver Joey Hand will compete Sept. 7-9 at WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca.

Hand, 39, from Sacramento, currently a Ford Factory driver, is our guest on Episode 52 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Hand his versatile victories in the 24-Hour of LeMans, Rolex 24 at Daytona and 12 Hours of Sebring. We also discuss Hand's current successful season and the season-ending finale.

In what he describes as his home race course, Hand will race Sept. 7-9 in the IMSA Weather Tech SportsCar Championship series at Laguna Seca Raceway in Salinas. He’s currently in third place in the standings.

When he's not competing, Hand’s supports his son Chase (age 11) when he races throughout the West Coast.

Joey Hand is also an Internet phenomenon. A video showing his car crash and repeated flips during a 2006 race in Lexington, Kentucky, is viral. It’s often referenced when Hand, who suffered no major injuries in the crash, meets fans at races.

Hand also discusses raising his son during the podcast episode, details participating at the highest levels of racing and discusses endurance racing when a vehicle has multiple drivers.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.
The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.offtrack.net]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 31:51
Episode #51, Colorado conversion man marries VW, Subaru https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/09/episode-51-colorado-conversion-man-marries-vw-subaru/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-51-colorado-conversion-man-marries-vw-subaru Mon, 03 Sep 2018 06:14:33 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30197 Vendors at the yearly Outdoor Retailer Show do an impressive job of attracting customers. But none of the companies had a better presentation than Helinox. It used a 1976 restored VW van. Helinox, which makes efficient compact lawnchairs, cots, umbrellas and other outdoor equipment used a VW restored by John Buschmann in his business called Urabus. The name is Subaru spelled in reverse, and Buschman is adapt using Subaru engines in vintage VWs. A 1976 Volkswagen Bus was used as part of the display for Helinox during Outdoor Retailer Summer Market in Denver. Image © James Raia/2018 Buschmann is our guest on Episode 51 of the Weekly Driver Podcast. Buschmann joins us from his shop Englewood, Colorado. He discusses his long interest in Volkswagen and why Subaru engines are an ideal fit for vintage vans. And he tells us about the process of converting and restoring vintage vehicles. Beyond Volkswagen, Buschmann is busy with a variety restorations: A 1969 Dodge A100, 1973 VW Beetle, 1970 Red VW camper, 1976 VW Green Bubble Top and a 1962 Tan VW Vanagon. Urabus currently has for sale: a 1980 Volkswagen Rabbit Diesel, 1977 Green Volkswagen Bus, 1969 Karmann Ghia, 1982 Burnt Orange Vanagon and a PGSG Adventure Bus As described in the company’s website, www.urabus.net. The company’s motto: “Go Forth. Your Adventure Awaits." In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com. The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from automotive/pop cuture podcast Off Track Vendors at the yearly Outdoor Retailer Show do an impressive job of attracting customers. But none of the companies had a better presentation than Helinox. It used a 1976 restored VW van. - Helinox, which makes efficient compact lawnchairs, cots,
Helinox, which makes efficient compact lawnchairs, cots, umbrellas and other outdoor equipment used a VW restored by John Buschmann in his business called Urabus. The name is Subaru spelled in reverse, and Buschman is adapt using Subaru engines in vintage VWs.

A 1976 Volkswagen Bus was used as part of the display for Helinox during Outdoor Retailer Summer Market in Denver. Image © James Raia/2018

Buschmann is our guest on Episode 51 of the Weekly Driver Podcast. Buschmann joins us from his shop Englewood, Colorado. He discusses his long interest in Volkswagen and why Subaru engines are an ideal fit for vintage vans. And he tells us about the process of converting and restoring vintage vehicles.

Beyond Volkswagen, Buschmann is busy with a variety restorations: A 1969 Dodge A100, 1973 VW Beetle, 1970 Red VW camper, 1976 VW Green Bubble Top and a 1962 Tan VW Vanagon.

Urabus currently has for sale: a 1980 Volkswagen Rabbit Diesel, 1977 Green Volkswagen Bus, 1969 Karmann Ghia, 1982 Burnt Orange Vanagon and a PGSG Adventure Bus

As described in the company’s website, www.urabus.net. The company’s motto: “Go Forth. Your Adventure Awaits."

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.
We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is presented by www.americanmuscle.com.

The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from automotive/pop cuture podcast Off Track]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 21:36
Episode 50, Pros & cons, etiquette for bidding at Classic Car Week https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/08/episode-50-pros-cons-etiquette-for-bidding-at-classic-car-week/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-50-pros-cons-etiquette-for-bidding-at-classic-car-week Sun, 19 Aug 2018 18:51:25 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30111 Car auctions are a significant component of Classic Car Week, attainable vehicles to one-of-a-kind rarities. Every auction house has its own style, and many auction attendees are veteran bidders with years of experience. Still, a refresher course for experienced car auction buyers and an introduction to proper bidding etiquette for new auction enthusiasts is a good thing. A Rolls-Royce on the auction block at the 2017 Mecum Auction during the 2017 Classic Car Week on the Monterey Peninsula. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2017 Chris Warren of Premier Financial Services, a leading provider of lease financing for exotic, vintage and luxury cars, is our guest Episode 50 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Bruce Aldrich and I have a lively discussion with Warren about proper etiquette and the ins-and-outs of car auctions. Classic Car Week includes six major auctions beginning Tuesday, Aug. 21. A vast selection of the world's finest and most expensive exotic and vintage cars, rare motorcycles and muscle cars and many attainable vehicles will be auctioned. Here are a few of the topics discussed to during the podcast: • Don't Jump in the Pool Right Away – Attend one or two auctions strictly as an observer, to gain a first-hand understanding of how they work. Pay attention to how serious buyers conduct themselves and the bidding tactics they use. • Get Pre-approval Before You Show Up – At many auctions, you'll need to apply for credentials to participate in the bidding. The auction company will likely review your financial situation. If you plan to finance or lease the car you purchase, you should obtain pre-approval from a firm that specializes in exotic and vintage cars. • Don't Follow the Herd – Bid on a vehicle that you really want to own and drive, not just because there's a lot of buzz or interest in a particular car. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com. Car auctions are a significant component of Classic Car Week, attainable vehicles to one-of-a-kind rarities. Every auction house has its own style, and many auction attendees are veteran bidders with years of experience. - Still,
Still, a refresher course for experienced car auction buyers and an introduction to proper bidding etiquette for new auction enthusiasts is a good thing.

A Rolls-Royce on the auction block at the 2017 Mecum Auction during the 2017 Classic Car Week on the Monterey Peninsula. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2017

Chris Warren of Premier Financial Services, a leading provider of lease financing for exotic, vintage and luxury cars, is our guest Episode 50 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Bruce Aldrich and I have a lively discussion with Warren about proper etiquette and the ins-and-outs of car auctions.

Classic Car Week includes six major auctions beginning Tuesday, Aug. 21. A vast selection of the world's finest and most expensive exotic and vintage cars, rare motorcycles and muscle cars and many attainable vehicles will be auctioned.

Here are a few of the topics discussed to during the podcast:

• Don't Jump in the Pool Right Away – Attend one or two auctions strictly as an observer, to gain a first-hand understanding of how they work. Pay attention to how serious buyers conduct themselves and the bidding tactics they use.

• Get Pre-approval Before You Show Up – At many auctions, you'll need to apply for credentials to participate in the bidding. The auction company will likely review your financial situation. If you plan to finance or lease the car you purchase, you should obtain pre-approval from a firm that specializes in exotic and vintage cars.

• Don't Follow the Herd – Bid on a vehicle that you really want to own and drive, not just because there's a lot of buzz or interest in a particular car.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.
We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 25:04
Episode 49, Leo Sens, age 12, expert car reviewer https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/08/episode-49-leo-sens-age-12-expert-car-reviewer/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-49-leo-sens-age-12-expert-car-reviewer Mon, 13 Aug 2018 01:10:13 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30087 Leo Sens is an outgoing 12-year-old boy with lots of interests. He's a musician and photographer. He likes automobiles, and he’s comfortable giving his opinion as a car reviewer. When his parents were shopping for a new car, Sens was in the back seat. Visiting car dealerships to purchase a vehicle isn’t often anyone’s favorite thing to do. But the younger Sens, who lives with an older sister and his parents in Oakland, California, was into it. A 2017 Audi A3 e-tron similar to the car reviewed by 12-year-old Leo Sens of Oakland, California. While his parents were in the front seat, he thought they needed the perspective of someone sitting in the back seat, a 12-year-old car reviewer. Thus, Backseat Driver, comprised of two YouTube videos, was born. Backseat Driver isn’t a novel name, but it likely is unique as the name of the auto reviews created by a grade school boy. Leo Sens is our guest on Episode 49 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-host Bruce Aldrich was on assignment, so I interviewed Leo while he was with his family in a rental car and driving near Washington, D.C. We discussed his favorite cars, the pros and cons of the car his parents purchased and the making of his YouTube videos. Josh Sens, Leo’s father, is a restaurant critic for San Francisco Magazine and a writer for Golf Magazine. I met Josh for the first time last month during a media day in advance of the U.S. Amateur Championship at Pebble Beach Golf Links and Spyglass Hill Golf Course on the Monterey Peninsula. Says the elder Sens about his son, the car reviewer: “The idea came about when my wife and I were looking for a new car. We test drove a bunch with him in the back seat and he was very opinionated about them all. He kept saying that parents don’t think about how cars drive for their kids. “He’s only done a couple of episodes but has written directed and edited them himself. He wants to do more but is also busy with guitar and a million things that kids waste time on.” Leo reiterated his father's thoughts. He said he plans to do additional car reviews when he has more time. Here’s his review of his parents’ car, a 2017 Audi A3 e-Tron. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com. Leo Sens is an outgoing 12-year-old boy with lots of interests. He's a musician and photographer. He likes automobiles, and he’s comfortable giving his opinion as a car reviewer. - When his parents were shopping for a new car,
When his parents were shopping for a new car, Sens was in the back seat. Visiting car dealerships to purchase a vehicle isn’t often anyone’s favorite thing to do. But the younger Sens, who lives with an older sister and his parents in Oakland, California, was into it.

A 2017 Audi A3 e-tron similar to the car reviewed by 12-year-old Leo Sens of Oakland, California.

While his parents were in the front seat, he thought they needed the perspective of someone sitting in the back seat, a 12-year-old car reviewer. Thus, Backseat Driver, comprised of two YouTube videos, was born.

Backseat Driver isn’t a novel name, but it likely is unique as the name of the auto reviews created by a grade school boy.

Leo Sens is our guest on Episode 49 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-host Bruce Aldrich was on assignment, so I interviewed Leo while he was with his family in a rental car and driving near Washington, D.C. We discussed his favorite cars, the pros and cons of the car his parents purchased and the making of his YouTube videos.

Josh Sens, Leo’s father, is a restaurant critic for San Francisco Magazine and a writer for Golf Magazine. I met Josh for the first time last month during a media day in advance of the U.S. Amateur Championship at Pebble Beach Golf Links and Spyglass Hill Golf Course on the Monterey Peninsula.

Says the elder Sens about his son, the car reviewer:

“The idea came about when my wife and I were looking for a new car. We test drove a bunch with him in the back seat and he was very opinionated about them all. He kept saying that parents don’t think about how cars drive for their kids.

“He’s only done a couple of episodes but has written directed and edited them himself. He wants to do more but is also busy with guitar and a million things that kids waste time on.”

Leo reiterated his father's thoughts. He said he plans to do additional car reviews when he has more time. Here’s his review of his parents’ car, a 2017 Audi A3 e-Tron.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail
All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 14:16
Episode 48, Monterey Peninsula couple rents vintage cars https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/08/episode-48-monterey-peninsula-couple-rents-vintage-cars/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-48-monterey-peninsula-couple-rents-vintage-cars Tue, 07 Aug 2018 19:44:50 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30071 Classic Car Week, the all-encompassing presentation on the Monterey Peninsula of all things automotive, including vintage cars, revitalizes itself yearly. Many auction and collection names remain the same. But newcomers, including Heather and Rob Gardner, help the collective refresh. The Gardners, who live in Carmel Valley, don't host a rally, auction or concours. But they could. A Mercedes-Benz limousine is among the vintage cars available for rent from Monterey Touring Vehicles. Image courtesy of Robbie McCay. Instead, the couple will experience their first year of the nearly two-week gathering as owners of Monterey Touring Vehicles (montereytouringvehicles.com). Rob, a physician, and Heather, a research scientist, recently decided their fleet of 36 vintage cars is best served when driven. Heather Gardner is our guest on Episode 48 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-host Bruce Aldrich and I discuss how Monterey Touring Vehicles began as well as the vintage cars the couple rents. The Gardner's collection is varied — muscle cars to kit cars and classic convertibles to an 81-year-old Mercedes limousine. The business has a new 10,000-square-foot location in Monterey so potential customers can view the fleet. Interest is expected to be strong during Classic Car Week, Aug. 17-26. And while Monterey Touring Rentals isn’t officially hosting an event, it's a sponsor of the Prancing Ponies Car Show (Aug. 22) and Legends of Auto Gala Dinner (Aug. 23). A 1965 Ford Mustang GT and 1965 Ford Shelby Cobra replica have been the most requested rentals. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com. Classic Car Week, the all-encompassing presentation on the Monterey Peninsula of all things automotive, including vintage cars, revitalizes itself yearly. Many auction and collection names remain the same. But newcomers,
The Gardners, who live in Carmel Valley, don't host a rally, auction or concours. But they could.

A Mercedes-Benz limousine is among the vintage cars available for rent from Monterey Touring Vehicles. Image courtesy of Robbie McCay.

Instead, the couple will experience their first year of the nearly two-week gathering as owners of Monterey Touring Vehicles (montereytouringvehicles.com). Rob, a physician, and Heather, a research scientist, recently decided their fleet of 36 vintage cars is best served when driven.

Heather Gardner is our guest on Episode 48 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-host Bruce Aldrich and I discuss how Monterey Touring Vehicles began as well as the vintage cars the couple rents.

The Gardner's collection is varied — muscle cars to kit cars and classic convertibles to an 81-year-old Mercedes limousine. The business has a new 10,000-square-foot location in Monterey so potential customers can view the fleet.

Interest is expected to be strong during Classic Car Week, Aug. 17-26. And while Monterey Touring Rentals isn’t officially hosting an event, it's a sponsor of the Prancing Ponies Car Show (Aug. 22) and Legends of Auto Gala Dinner (Aug. 23).

A 1965 Ford Mustang GT and 1965 Ford Shelby Cobra replica have been the most requested rentals.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.
We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 26:30
Episode 47, Simple innovation for auto travel plentiful https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/07/episode-47-simple-innovation-for-auto-travel-plentiful/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-47-simple-innovation-for-auto-travel-plentiful Mon, 30 Jul 2018 21:00:15 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30054 Based in Oakland, Helinox (www.helinox.com) was among numerous vendors at the recent Outdoor Retailer Summer Market in Denver. The annual trade show showcases a vast array of merchandise, some geared toward various automotive user groups. “We obviously come from the outdoors, but we recognize the way in which people get to the outdoors is often by automobile," said Azul Couzens, vice president of the company that also makes umbrellas and trekking poles. “More people are active in the outdoors with their cars. They’re going all-terrain; they’re going with their van and they’re going with their restored VW van or Land Cruiser.” A 1976 Volkswagen Bus was used as part of the display for Helinox during Outdoor Retailer Summer Market in Denver. Image © James Raia/2018 The Chair Zero collapses and fits into a pull-string bag the size of a water bottle. It weighs one pound and can hold a person weighing as much as 275 pounds. “People are looking for equipment knowing that space is at a premium and that’s where we come in,” said Azul. “We offer lightweight, collapsible and portable furniture that delivers on comfort when you’re away from home. It really comes down to how much comfort you want to carry and how far you have to carry it once you pull it out of your car.” Helinox displayed most of its products at Outdoor Retailer with traditional shelving. But a centerpiece of furniture was positioned around a restored 1976 Volkswagen bus. The vans are a time capsule of efficient outdoor-oriented travel, an ideal match for Helinox. Here are three more automotive-related products from the Outdoor Retailer Summer Market: * Aquabot (www.lunatecgear.com) — It's called a hydration spray bottle. It has three patterns — mist, stream and shower. It's available in several sizes and colors. According to Nick Rhea, president of Lunatec Gear, it's good to use to "cool off, clean off and hydrate." The largest and most elaborate bottle, the Comet, holds one liter (33.8 ounces) and includes a sleeve and a 36-inch long tube. It eliminates having to pick-up the bottle while driving. The Comet is also popular among golfers, backpackers and cyclists. "It just makes drinking more convenient," said Rhea. "We make innovative gear that simplifies your life, and to ease complicated adventures.” * Hi-Tec/Magnum (www.hi-tec.com) — Outdoorsmen, military and law enforcement personnel and truck drivers often make long hauls in bulky shoes with little ankle support. Magnum, the world's top-selling tactical boot, makes a six-inch and eight-high boots. The boots provide strong ankle support, but it results in drivers having difficulty articulating their feet when using gas, brake or clutch pedals. All Magnum boots have a flexible "round-up" heal for pivoting and flexibility overall comfort for daily use while driving a vehicle. The boot is uniform-oriented with a clean, rounded toe for polishing, but with a high-top portion for support. * Knockaround (www.knockaround.com) — The idea is affordability, and it’s reflected in the name. The San Diego company makes cheap sunglasses in a near-countless offering on colors and sizes. And the sunglasses include components of prominent brands, like polarization, ideal for driving. “Beat ‘em up, wear ‘em, lose, scratch ‘em, break ‘em and buy another pair for not that much,” said company vice president Ed Rainey. Knock around sunglasses range from $10-$30. The company started about 12 years ago when its founder lost his RayBans on the beach didn’t feel like spending $200 to replace them. Based in Oakland, Helinox (www.helinox.com) was among numerous vendors at the recent Outdoor Retailer Summer Market in Denver. The annual trade show showcases a vast array of merchandise, some geared toward various automotive user groups. - www.helinox.com) was among numerous vendors at the recent Outdoor Retailer Summer Market in Denver. The annual trade show showcases a vast array of merchandise, some geared toward various automotive user groups.



“We obviously come from the outdoors, but we recognize the way in which people get to the outdoors is often by automobile," said Azul Couzens, vice president of the company that also makes umbrellas and trekking poles. “More people are active in the outdoors with their cars. They’re going all-terrain; they’re going with their van and they’re going with their restored VW van or Land Cruiser.”



A 1976 Volkswagen Bus was used as part of the display for Helinox during Outdoor Retailer Summer Market in Denver. Image © James Raia/2018

The Chair Zero collapses and fits into a pull-string bag the size of a water bottle. It weighs one pound and can hold a person weighing as much as 275 pounds.

“People are looking for equipment knowing that space is at a premium and that’s where we come in,” said Azul. “We offer lightweight, collapsible and portable furniture that delivers on comfort when you’re away from home. It really comes down to how much comfort you want to carry and how far you have to carry it once you pull it out of your car.”

Helinox displayed most of its products at Outdoor Retailer with traditional shelving. But a centerpiece of furniture was positioned around a restored 1976 Volkswagen bus. The vans are a time capsule of efficient outdoor-oriented travel, an ideal match for Helinox.
Here are three more automotive-related products from the Outdoor Retailer Summer Market:

* Aquabot (www.lunatecgear.com) — It's called a hydration spray bottle. It has three patterns — mist, stream and shower. It's available in several sizes and colors. According to Nick Rhea, president of Lunatec Gear, it's good to use to "cool off, clean off and hydrate."
The largest and most elaborate bottle, the Comet, holds one liter (33.8 ounces) and includes a sleeve and a 36-inch long tube. It eliminates having to pick-up the bottle while driving. The Comet is also popular among golfers, backpackers and cyclists.

"It just makes drinking more convenient," said Rhea. "We make innovative gear that simplifies your life, and to ease complicated adventures.”

* Hi-Tec/Magnum (www.hi-tec.com) — Outdoorsmen, military and law enforcement personnel and truck drivers often make long hauls in bulky shoes with little ankle support. Magnum, the world's top-selling tactical boot, makes a six-inch and eight-high boots.

The boots provide strong ankle support, but it results in drivers having difficulty articulating their feet when using gas, brake or clutch pedals.

All Magnum boots have a flexible "round-up" heal for pivoting and flexibility overall comfort for daily use while driving a vehicle. The boot is uniform-oriented with a clean, rounded toe for polishing, but with a high-top portion for support.

* Knockaround (www.knockaround.com) — The idea is affordability, and it’s reflected in the name. The San Diego company makes cheap sunglasses in a near-countless offering on colors and sizes. And the sunglasses include components of prominent brands, like polarization, ideal for driving.

“Beat ‘em up, wear ‘em, lose, scratch ‘em, break ‘em and buy another pair for not that much,” said company vice president Ed Rainey. Knock around sunglasses range from $10-$30.

The company started about 12 years ago when its founder lost his RayBans on the beach didn’t fee...]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 22:31
Episode 46, Raleigh, Corpus Christi, best driving cities https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/07/episode-46-raleigh-corpus-christi-best-driving-cities/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-46-raleigh-corpus-christi-best-driving-cities Tue, 24 Jul 2018 18:23:44 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30039 According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, 87 percent of daily trips occur in personal vehicles. Reasons vary, but comfort and reliability are primary reasons, and they're important. Drivers spend an average of 290 hours on the road per year. The statistics are also crucial to analysts at WalletHub.com, the personal finance website that uses data-driven journalism to create best and worst lists and various surveys. The Weekly Driver Podcast in Episode #46 discusses best/worst driving cities and some unique vehicles that will be shown in August during Monterey Auto Week like the Tucker. One recent article, using 29 key indicators of driver friendliness, is a list of the top 100 cities across the United States for driver friendliness. Raleigh, N.C., gets the top honor, followed by Corpus Christi, Texas and Orlando, Florida. Dubious honors were awarded to Oakland, California, San Francisco, California and Detroit, Michigan. In episode #48 of The Weekly Driver Podcast, hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia speak with John Kiernan about WalletHub, its best and worst driving cities article and what the results mean. The annual smorgasbord of all things automotive with called Monterey Auto Week or Classic Car will be held in mid-August. In this episode, we also discuss to the unusual vehicles that will be showcased this year during the Concours d'Elegance, Citreon and Tucker. Preston Tucker and his cohorts made 51 vehicles, designed in Michigan and built in Chicago. The prototype was called the Tucker Torpedo; the production model the Tucker 48. It was manufactured in about a one-year span in 1946-47 as a 1948 model. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail . All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.   According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, 87 percent of daily trips occur in personal vehicles. Reasons vary, but comfort and reliability are primary reasons, and they're important. Drivers spend an average of 290 hours on the road per year...
The statistics are also crucial to analysts at WalletHub.com, the personal finance website that uses data-driven journalism to create best and worst lists and various surveys.

The Weekly Driver Podcast in Episode #46 discusses best/worst driving cities and some unique vehicles that will be shown in August during Monterey Auto Week like the Tucker.

One recent article, using 29 key indicators of driver friendliness, is a list of the top 100 cities across the United States for driver friendliness. Raleigh, N.C., gets the top honor, followed by Corpus Christi, Texas and Orlando, Florida.

Dubious honors were awarded to Oakland, California, San Francisco, California and Detroit, Michigan.

In episode #48 of The Weekly Driver Podcast, hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia speak with John Kiernan about WalletHub, its best and worst driving cities article and what the results mean.

The annual smorgasbord of all things automotive with called Monterey Auto Week or Classic Car will be held in mid-August. In this episode, we also discuss to the unusual vehicles that will be showcased this year during the Concours d'Elegance, Citreon and Tucker.

Preston Tucker and his cohorts made 51 vehicles, designed in Michigan and built in Chicago. The prototype was called the Tucker Torpedo; the production model the Tucker 48. It was manufactured in about a one-year span in 1946-47 as a 1948 model.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail .

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.
We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 32:03
Episode 45, Fast, furious Mecum Auctions returns to Monterey https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/07/episode-45-fast-furious-mecum-auctions-returns-to-monterey/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-45-fast-furious-mecum-auctions-returns-to-monterey Fri, 13 Jul 2018 00:37:44 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=30004 Ask John Kraman a question about automobile auctions, vintage cars, industry trends or automotive history and the answers come fast and furious from the Mecum Auctions expert. He's as enthusiastic as anyone and his knowledge flows as fast as verbal clarity allows. As the Director of Company Relations and Lead TV Commentator/Analyst Mecum Auctions, Kraman will be part of the vast staff again present at the world's largest car collectors auction during Monterey Auto Week in August. About 600 vehicles are presented about every two minutes a the Mecum Auctions during Monterey Auto Week. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2017 . The rapid-fire auction will present about 600 cars during Mecum's three-day presence during the gathering of all things automotive held on the Monterey Peninsula. Kaman is our guest on episode No. 45 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia talk with Kraman about what to expect this year when Mecum Auctions is held Aug. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency Monterey Hotel and Spa and Del Monte Golf Course. Exotics, muscle cars, sports cars, vintage vans and pick-up trucks, tractors and memorabilia will all be available to examine and then be will be auctioned in a controlled whirlwind of activity. It will Mecum Auction's ninth auction in 2018. A mechanic, pilot and car collector, Kraman keeps the banter fresh and fast-paced during the presentation of the cars, truck, tractors and motorcycles. Among the rarities for auction this year are a 2015 Ferrari LaFerrari, 2014 Pagani Huayra, 2006 Ford GT Heritage Edition and 2012 Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport 16.4. A comprehensive guide to all of the company's auctions and details of the vehicles set for auction at the Monterey auction is available on the website, www.mecum.com. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com. Ask John Kraman a question about automobile auctions, vintage cars, industry trends or automotive history and the answers come fast and furious from the Mecum Auctions expert. He's as enthusiastic as anyone and his knowledge flows as fast as verbal cla...
As the Director of Company Relations and Lead TV Commentator/Analyst Mecum Auctions, Kraman will be part of the vast staff again present at the world's largest car collectors auction during Monterey Auto Week in August.

About 600 vehicles are presented about every two minutes a the Mecum Auctions during Monterey Auto Week. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2017 .

The rapid-fire auction will present about 600 cars during Mecum's three-day presence during the gathering of all things automotive held on the Monterey Peninsula.

Kaman is our guest on episode No. 45 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia talk with Kraman about what to expect this year when Mecum Auctions is held Aug. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency Monterey Hotel and Spa and Del Monte Golf Course.

Exotics, muscle cars, sports cars, vintage vans and pick-up trucks, tractors and memorabilia will all be available to examine and then be will be auctioned in a controlled whirlwind of activity. It will Mecum Auction's ninth auction in 2018.

A mechanic, pilot and car collector, Kraman keeps the banter fresh and fast-paced during the presentation of the cars, truck, tractors and motorcycles.

Among the rarities for auction this year are a 2015 Ferrari LaFerrari, 2014 Pagani Huayra, 2006 Ford GT Heritage Edition and 2012 Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport 16.4.

A comprehensive guide to all of the company's auctions and details of the vehicles set for auction at the Monterey auction is available on the website, www.mecum.com.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 26:06
Episode 44: Expert examines Honda Clarity Fuel Cell https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/06/episode-44-expert-examines-honda-clarity-fuel-cell/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-44-expert-examines-honda-clarity-fuel-cell Fri, 29 Jun 2018 22:51:38 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29970 Driving from Northern California to Southern California and back has been routine in recent years. The 800-mile round-trip trek along Interstate 5 is always interesting, particularly when driving a 2017 Honda Clarity Fuel Cell. Six weeks ago was the most unusual trek I've taken from Sacramento to the Los Angeles region (this time to Long Beach) because I drove the sedan that runs on hydrogen. The 2017 and 2018 Honda Clarity Fuel Cell are available for lease in California. From the expediency of refueling to the performance of the Clarity and from the use of the High Occupancy Lane as a single occupant to running out of hydrogen were all part of the unique experience. The Clarity won me over quickly. I wrote my syndicated automotive for Bay Area News Group, Autopia, about my experiences with the Clarity, and I received several critical letters. Steve Ellis is the manager of fuel cell marketing for Honda, and he has also had several other responsibilities in the alternative fuel industry. Before my trip, Ellis provided a map of the hydrogen charging stations for my trip and other details. He was instrumental in helping me after I ran out of hydrogen on my return trip. Ellis is our guest on Episode 44 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-host Bruce Aldrich and I discuss the Honda Clarity and its three trims, hydrogen, electric and hybrid. We also discuss hydrogen's future in the automotive world, and I ask Steve to address the concerns of three readers of my column. I've printed their email letters below (without the authors' names). 1. I was not able to find a contact address on the True Zero website, the hydrogen source for the Honda Clarity. I think True Zero is a very misleading name for your source since two-thirds of the hydrogen provided is from fossil fuel sources. So long as this is the case, True Zero is simply false as a name for this company. We know hydrogen can be produced from water, but so long as the process depends on fossil fuels, as it does for the bulk of the hydrogen from True Zero, then it is not a solution to fossil fuel-driven climate change. A useful article would be one comparing total emissions from plug-in electric vehicles fueled by solar panels with currently available hydrogen-powered vehicles powered primarily by fossil fuels. I’ve driven a plug-in electric Ford Focus since 2012. If more of us did this, we’d see much cleaner air in the SF Bay Area and fewer children would suffer from asthma. 2. In the Drive section of the San Jose Mercury-News May 27, 2018, the headline reads "Honda Clarity Fuel Cell thrives on water." This is very wrong. It is as bad as saying that humans thrive on urine. To thrive on something should mean to do well as a result of it. This fuel cell does not use water as fuel; it uses hydrogen. It emits water as a waste product. Even if you try to justify it by saying that hydrogen is made from water, the water does not supply the energy. Something else (typically electricity) supplies the energy to make hydrogen from water. 3. I drive a (Chevy) Volt and read with interest your article which appeared today in the SJ Mercury. However, when I did the math I wondered what I was missing. You said you drove 221 miles on 3.658 kilos at a cost of $60.19. My math shows that the fuel cost was .27 per mile. Assume a Prius getting 50 miles per gallon and a fuel cost of $4.00 per gallon. That comes to $.08 per mile. The cost of the Clarity is over 3X the Prius. So while I would love to see fuel cell cars succeed, how can anyone be expected to buy a Clarity other than because she or he loves the environment and wants to make a statement? While I think the article was great on describing the vehicle, don’t you believe you need to make these points to your readers who may not think through how the economics compare? In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail . Driving from Northern California to Southern California and back has been routine in recent years. The 800-mile round-trip trek along Interstate 5 is always interesting, particularly when driving a 2017 Honda Clarity Fuel Cell. - 2017 Honda Clarity Fuel Cell.

Six weeks ago was the most unusual trek I've taken from Sacramento to the Los Angeles region (this time to Long Beach) because I drove the sedan that runs on hydrogen.

The 2017 and 2018 Honda Clarity Fuel Cell are available for lease in California.

From the expediency of refueling to the performance of the Clarity and from the use of the High Occupancy Lane as a single occupant to running out of hydrogen were all part of the unique experience. The Clarity won me over quickly.

I wrote my syndicated automotive for Bay Area News Group, Autopia, about my experiences with the Clarity, and I received several critical letters.

Steve Ellis is the manager of fuel cell marketing for Honda, and he has also had several other responsibilities in the alternative fuel industry. Before my trip, Ellis provided a map of the hydrogen charging stations for my trip and other details. He was instrumental in helping me after I ran out of hydrogen on my return trip.

Ellis is our guest on Episode 44 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-host Bruce Aldrich and I discuss the Honda Clarity and its three trims, hydrogen, electric and hybrid. We also discuss hydrogen's future in the automotive world, and I ask Steve to address the concerns of three readers of my column. I've printed their email letters below (without the authors' names).

1. I was not able to find a contact address on the True Zero website, the hydrogen source for the Honda Clarity. I think True Zero is a very misleading name for your source since two-thirds of the hydrogen provided is from fossil fuel sources. So long as this is the case, True Zero is simply false as a name for this company. We know hydrogen can be produced from water, but so long as the process depends on fossil fuels, as it does for the bulk of the hydrogen from True Zero, then it is not a solution to fossil fuel-driven climate change.

A useful article would be one comparing total emissions from plug-in electric vehicles fueled by solar panels with currently available hydrogen-powered vehicles powered primarily by fossil fuels. I’ve driven a plug-in electric Ford Focus since 2012. If more of us did this, we’d see much cleaner air in the SF Bay Area and fewer children would suffer from asthma.

2. In the Drive section of the San Jose Mercury-News May 27, 2018, the headline reads "Honda Clarity Fuel Cell thrives on water." This is very wrong. It is as bad as saying that humans thrive on urine. To thrive on something should mean to do well as a result of it. This fuel cell does not use water as fuel; it uses hydrogen. It emits water as a waste product.

Even if you try to justify it by saying that hydrogen is made from water, the water does not supply the energy. Something else (typically electricity) supplies the energy to make hydrogen from water.

3. I drive a (Chevy) Volt and read with interest your article which appeared today in the SJ Mercury. However, when I did the math I wondered what I was missing. You said you drove 221 miles on 3.658 kilos at a cost of $60.19. My math shows that the fuel cost was .27 per mile. Assume a Prius getting 50 miles per gallon and a fuel cost of $4.00 per gallon. That comes to $.08 per mile. The cost of the Clarity is over 3X the Prius.

]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 43:55
Episode 43, Don’t leave pets, children alone in vehicles https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/06/episode-43-dont-leave-pets-children-alone-in-vehicles/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-43-dont-leave-pets-children-alone-in-vehicles Fri, 22 Jun 2018 19:13:19 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29942 Tragedy strikes every summer. Children and pets die from heatstroke after being left unattended in cars and trucks. It should never happen, but it does when unknowing vehicle owners think leaving a window slightly open or parking in the shade alleviates potential problems. But it's not sufficient. Within minutes after children or animals are left in a vehicle, temperatures can drastically rise and wreak havoc. Young children and pets can’t help themselves. Never leave pets or children unattended in vehicles. In Episode #43 of The Weekly Driver Podcast, co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia speak with Dan Carron, a senior analyst for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). The animal rights organization based in Norfolk, Virginia, reports: “Every year, dogs suffer and die when their guardians make the mistake of leaving them in a parked car—even for “just a minute”—while they run an errand. Parked cars are deathtraps for dogs: On a 78-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can soar to 100 degrees in just minutes, and on a 90-degree day, the interior temperature can reach as high as 109 degrees in less than 10 minutes.” Carron provides statistics and sad examples of the animal cruelty when owners believed their pets would be okay when left in vehicles “because it was only going to be for a few minutes.” Carron also notes that PETA provides free pamphlets and posters for the public stressing the dangers of leaving animals in vehicles. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The WeeklyDriver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.   Tragedy strikes every summer. Children and pets die from heatstroke after being left unattended in cars and trucks. It should never happen, but it does when unknowing vehicle owners think leaving a window slightly open or parking in the shade alleviate...
But it's not sufficient. Within minutes after children or animals are left in a vehicle, temperatures can drastically rise and wreak havoc. Young children and pets can’t help themselves.

Never leave pets or children unattended in vehicles.

In Episode #43 of The Weekly Driver Podcast, co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia speak with Dan Carron, a senior analyst for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). The animal rights organization based in Norfolk, Virginia, reports:

“Every year, dogs suffer and die when their guardians make the mistake of leaving them in a parked car—even for “just a minute”—while they run an errand. Parked cars are deathtraps for dogs: On a 78-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can soar to 100 degrees in just minutes, and on a 90-degree day, the interior temperature can reach as high as 109 degrees in less than 10 minutes.”

Carron provides statistics and sad examples of the animal cruelty when owners believed their pets would be okay when left in vehicles “because it was only going to be for a few minutes.”

Carron also notes that PETA provides free pamphlets and posters for the public stressing the dangers of leaving animals in vehicles.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The WeeklyDriver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 24:00
Episode 42, Ford F-150 still rules, less safe cars, hydrogen https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/06/episode-42-ford-f-150-still-rules-less-safe-cars-hydrogen/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-42-ford-f-150-still-rules-less-safe-cars-hydrogen Tue, 19 Jun 2018 05:55:28 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29924 The Ford F-150 pick-up has no equals, except for its siblings. They comprise the stable of the country's best-selling pick-up trucks. The truck's legacy as the second best-selling vehicle in history as well as its pros and cons among three topics discussed in Episode 42 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia recently drove the 2018 Ford F-150 (Lariat) trim. Neither of us are pick-up enthusiasts, but the new F-150 won us over. It's powerful, comfortable, spacious, rugged and luxurious — at least as much as pick-up trucks can be luxurious. The Ford F-150 is the country's top-selling pickup and the second best-selliing vehicle in history — and for plenty of reasons. Image © James Raia/2018 The new Ford F-150 is also expensive. We review the turbo-charged diesel equipped with a 10-speed automatic transmission and 250 horsepower. It leaves little doubt why Ford pickups are increasingly popular Bruce and I also discuss a recent report that examines car features that make driving less safe. And we also revisit the Honda Clarity Fuel Cell. We review a recent interview I had with Chris White, the communications director of the California Fuel Cell Partnership. White has been leasing the Clarity fuel cell for more than 1 1/2 years. She was the first person in Northern California to lease the vehicle that operates on hydrogen. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.   The Ford F-150 pick-up has no equals, except for its siblings. They comprise the stable of the country's best-selling pick-up trucks. The truck's legacy as the second best-selling vehicle in history as well as its pros and cons among three topics discu... The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia recently drove the 2018 Ford F-150 (Lariat) trim. Neither of us are pick-up enthusiasts, but the new F-150 won us over. It's powerful, comfortable, spacious, rugged and luxurious — at least as much as pick-up trucks can be luxurious.

The Ford F-150 is the country's top-selling pickup and the second best-selliing vehicle in history — and for plenty of reasons. Image © James Raia/2018

The new Ford F-150 is also expensive. We review the turbo-charged diesel equipped with a 10-speed automatic transmission and 250 horsepower. It leaves little doubt why Ford pickups are increasingly popular

Bruce and I also discuss a recent report that examines car features that make driving less safe. And we also revisit the Honda Clarity Fuel Cell. We review a recent interview I had with Chris White, the communications director of the California Fuel Cell Partnership. White has been leasing the Clarity fuel cell for more than 1 1/2 years. She was the first person in Northern California to lease the vehicle that operates on hydrogen.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 27:37
Episode 41, Goodbye to the VW Beetle, Ford sedans https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/06/episode-41-goodbye-to-the-vw-beetle-ford-sedans/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-41-goodbye-to-the-vw-beetle-ford-sedans Wed, 13 Jun 2018 17:02:53 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29909 The automotive industry is always changing. But two of the more significant announcements in recent years — the apparent demise of the VW Beetle and the jettison of the majority of Ford sedans — is the focus of Episode 41 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the recent announcements by the respective carmakers in the news-oriented edition of our ongoing week chat about all things cars and trucks. The VW Beetle may soon no longer be made. Image © James Raia/2017 The pending loss of several Ford models and the icon Beetle came, respectively, in a press release from the former and the text of a speech by a VW executive in Europe. The Beetle was first sold in the United States in 1949. Sales of the iconic vehicle suffered in 2017, with 15,116 new units sold. It was 3.2 percent lower than 2016 sales. Also in Episode 41, we discuss Ford’s massive pending changes. The carmaker recently announced it “will transition to two vehicles.” The remaining sedans will be the iconic Mustang and an unannounced vehicle, the Focus Active. Currently, Ford sells six sedans and coupes in North America: the Fiesta, Focus, Fusion, C-Max, Mustang and Taurus. This lineup hits multiple segments, from the compact Fiesta to the mid-size Focus, C-Max and Fusion to the full-size Taurus. The Mustang stands alone as the lone coupe. It’s likely Lincoln’s sedans will also disappear, though this was not explicitly stated in today’s press release. Lincoln currently sells the mid-size MKZ and full-size Continental — both share platforms with Ford counterparts. If Ford is phasing out the development of sedan platforms, Lincoln will likely suffer, too. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com. The automotive industry is always changing. But two of the more significant announcements in recent years — the apparent demise of the VW Beetle and the jettison of the majority of Ford sedans — is the focus of Episode 41 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.
Co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the recent announcements by the respective carmakers in the news-oriented edition of our ongoing week chat about all things cars and trucks.

The VW Beetle may soon no longer be made. Image © James Raia/2017

The pending loss of several Ford models and the icon Beetle came, respectively, in a press release from the former and the text of a speech by a VW executive in Europe. The Beetle was first sold in the United States in 1949.

Sales of the iconic vehicle suffered in 2017, with 15,116 new units sold. It was 3.2 percent lower than 2016 sales.

Also in Episode 41, we discuss Ford’s massive pending changes. The carmaker recently announced it “will transition to two vehicles.” The remaining sedans will be the iconic Mustang and an unannounced vehicle, the Focus Active.

Currently, Ford sells six sedans and coupes in North America: the Fiesta, Focus, Fusion, C-Max, Mustang and Taurus. This lineup hits multiple segments, from the compact Fiesta to the mid-size Focus, C-Max and Fusion to the full-size Taurus. The Mustang stands alone as the lone coupe.

It’s likely Lincoln’s sedans will also disappear, though this was not explicitly stated in today’s press release. Lincoln currently sells the mid-size MKZ and full-size Continental — both share platforms with Ford counterparts. If Ford is phasing out the development of sedan platforms, Lincoln will likely suffer, too.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 24:13
Episode 40, Classic car owners, renters meet on DriveShare https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/06/episode-40-classic-car-owners-renters-meet-on-driveshare/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-40-classic-car-owners-renters-meet-on-driveshare Wed, 06 Jun 2018 01:14:30 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29884 Peter Zawadzki is as passionate about classic cars as any enthusiast. About four years ago, he had a keen idea to allow others to share his appreciation. He decided to rent out his 1958 MGA. A couple made it part of their wedding celebration. Fast-forward and the success of the initial transaction is the Hagerty DriveShare Program. It’s the online marketplace for owners of classic vehicles to rent their wheels to other enthusiasts. It’s worked. A 1959 Rolls-Royce is among the diverse classic rental cars available on DriveShare.com. Getaway weekends, weddings, anniversaries and pending buyers who seek to test a comparable vehicle to a classic they’re considering purchasing, are among the reasons owners and renters meet on the website. “At the time, there was really no product available that allowed you to do it, especially nothing that would handle the insurance,” said Zawadzki, our guest on Episode No. 40 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. “It’s really important especially if you’re lending your car out to someone you know or someone you don’t know, and you want to make sure that car is covered.” Relying on a business model similar to Airbnb, the Hagerty DriveShare Program provides a platform for classic car owners to market their classic vehicles and for renters to find vehicles for special occasions. Zawadzki, a former Hagerty customer, presented the idea to the classic vehicle insurance company. He's now the program's director. The site is loaded with vehicles available in nearly every state and with diverse price ranges. Details of how the program works are available on the website driveshare.com. According to the website, “DriveShare is on a mission to keep car culture alive, making damn sure that people who love cars will always have the choice to go for a drive. This is where you come in: share your car and your passion with others – help grow the next generation of car people. The road awaits.” “The response has been great,” said Zawadzki. “We have had a lot of people buy their first classic car after renting a car on the website.” In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com. Peter Zawadzki is as passionate about classic cars as any enthusiast. About four years ago, he had a keen idea to allow others to share his appreciation. He decided to rent out his 1958 MGA. A couple made it part of their wedding celebration. -
Fast-forward and the success of the initial transaction is the Hagerty DriveShare Program. It’s the online marketplace for owners of classic vehicles to rent their wheels to other enthusiasts. It’s worked.

A 1959 Rolls-Royce is among the diverse classic rental cars available on DriveShare.com.

Getaway weekends, weddings, anniversaries and pending buyers who seek to test a comparable vehicle to a classic they’re considering purchasing, are among the reasons owners and renters meet on the website.

“At the time, there was really no product available that allowed you to do it, especially nothing that would handle the insurance,” said Zawadzki, our guest on Episode No. 40 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. “It’s really important especially if you’re lending your car out to someone you know or someone you don’t know, and you want to make sure that car is covered.”

Relying on a business model similar to Airbnb, the Hagerty DriveShare Program provides a platform for classic car owners to market their classic vehicles and for renters to find vehicles for special occasions. Zawadzki, a former Hagerty customer, presented the idea to the classic vehicle insurance company. He's now the program's director.

The site is loaded with vehicles available in nearly every state and with diverse price ranges. Details of how the program works are available on the website driveshare.com.

According to the website, “DriveShare is on a mission to keep car culture alive, making damn sure that people who love cars will always have the choice to go for a drive. This is where you come in: share your car and your passion with others – help grow the next generation of car people. The road awaits.”

“The response has been great,” said Zawadzki. “We have had a lot of people buy their first classic car after renting a car on the website.”

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail
All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 29:33
Episode #39, Indy 500, Danica Patrick and a reporter’s legacy https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/05/episode-39-indy-500-danica-patrick-and-a-reporters-legacy/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-39-indy-500-danica-patrick-and-a-reporters-legacy Thu, 24 May 2018 18:24:03 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29791 Mark Glover has been a journalist for more than 40 years. He's reported on sports, news and business and with a keen interest in automobile racing, particularly the Indianapolis 500. Glover, who lives in Sacramento, will be attending the Indy 500 with his son. It's a special time, since the duo has been attending the event together for nearly 30 years. The elder Glover is well into his second half-century of witnessing what is called the "Greatest Spectacle In Racing." The Indy 500 is the "Greatest Spectacle in Racing." Sacramento Journalist Mark Glover will be attending the race for the 56th time. Glover is our guest on Episode 39 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-host Bruce Aldrich and I talk with Mark about his history at the Indy 500, the event he first attended with his father when he was a young boy. We also talk with Mark iconic drivers, four-time winner A.J. Foyt to Danica Patrick, who is competing in the last race of her career. We discuss changes in the race and the evolving cars. Bruce and I also ask Mark about his favorite drivers and memories from the event. The 102nd Indianapolis 500 is scheduled Sunday, May 27. Watching or listening to the event is available in traditions and non-traditional broadcasts. Here’s a link to IndyMotorSpeedway.com. It provides a good overview of the various methods to experience the event. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on thw website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com. Mark Glover has been a journalist for more than 40 years. He's reported on sports, news and business and with a keen interest in automobile racing, particularly the Indianapolis 500. - Glover, who lives in Sacramento,
Glover, who lives in Sacramento, will be attending the Indy 500 with his son. It's a special time, since the duo has been attending the event together for nearly 30 years. The elder Glover is well into his second half-century of witnessing what is called the "Greatest Spectacle In Racing."

The Indy 500 is the "Greatest Spectacle in Racing." Sacramento Journalist Mark Glover will be attending the race for the 56th time.

Glover is our guest on Episode 39 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Co-host Bruce Aldrich and I talk with Mark about his history at the Indy 500, the event he first attended with his father when he was a young boy.

We also talk with Mark iconic drivers, four-time winner A.J. Foyt to Danica Patrick, who is competing in the last race of her career. We discuss changes in the race and the evolving cars.

Bruce and I also ask Mark about his favorite drivers and memories from the event.

The 102nd Indianapolis 500 is scheduled Sunday, May 27.

Watching or listening to the event is available in traditions and non-traditional broadcasts. Here’s a link to IndyMotorSpeedway.com. It provides a good overview of the various methods to experience the event.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on thw website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 32:54
Episode 36, New sales for old cars, vintage car passion https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/05/episode-36-lending-tree/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-36-lending-tree Wed, 09 May 2018 05:40:01 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29762 Lending Tree, a leading online exchange based in Charlotte, N.C., connects consumers with banks, credit institutions and other lenders to negotiate the best deals. It also releases studies to provide pertinent statistics to customers. A recent study, tabulated with thousands of transactions, details the top 50 metropolitan areas whose car buyers purchased the oldest used cars. The national average age for a used car purchase is six years old. This vintage Packard, owned by Zane Buck, personifies the varied vautomobiles on display at the recent Pacific Coast Dream Machines in Half Moon Bay, California. All images © Bruce Aldrich/2018. Jen Jones, an autos writer for Lending Tree, is our first guest on episode No. 36 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Responding to co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia, Jones provides insight into the survey. She explains why it was done, what the results mean and the surprises Lending Tree discovered while analyzing used car buying preferences. In the second half of the episode, Aldrich and Raia revisit the recent Pacific Coast Dream Machines, the eccentric automotive show in Half Moon Bay, California. Raia interviews Zane Buck and Eva Waves. Buck and his friend Dante DiLallo and the young men's fathers visited the show to not only look at other vintage vehicles but to exhibit Buck's classic Packard. Waves and her family and friends were relaxing near the family's camper van, a vintage Volkswagen Westfalia. She also explain's the Westfalia's interesting background. Eva Waves owns a 1971 Volkswagen Wesfalia. It's one of the most popular vintage camper vans. Like all vintage vehicle owners, Buck and Waves have stories to tell about how they acquired their respective used cars and their reasons for attending Pacific Coast Dream Machines. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com. Lending Tree, a leading online exchange based in Charlotte, N.C., connects consumers with banks, credit institutions and other lenders to negotiate the best deals. It also releases studies to provide pertinent statistics to customers. -
A recent study, tabulated with thousands of transactions, details the top 50 metropolitan areas whose car buyers purchased the oldest used cars. The national average age for a used car purchase is six years old.

This vintage Packard, owned by Zane Buck, personifies the varied vautomobiles on display at the recent Pacific Coast Dream Machines in Half Moon Bay, California. All images © Bruce Aldrich/2018.

Jen Jones, an autos writer for Lending Tree, is our first guest on episode No. 36 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Responding to co-hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia, Jones provides insight into the survey. She explains why it was done, what the results mean and the surprises Lending Tree discovered while analyzing used car buying preferences.

In the second half of the episode, Aldrich and Raia revisit the recent Pacific Coast Dream Machines, the eccentric automotive show in Half Moon Bay, California. Raia interviews Zane Buck and Eva Waves.

Buck and his friend Dante DiLallo and the young men's fathers visited the show to not only look at other vintage vehicles but to exhibit Buck's classic Packard. Waves and her family and friends were relaxing near the family's camper van, a vintage Volkswagen Westfalia. She also explain's the Westfalia's interesting background.

Eva Waves owns a 1971 Volkswagen Wesfalia. It's one of the most popular vintage camper vans.

Like all vintage vehicle owners, Buck and Waves have stories to tell about how they acquired their respective used cars and their reasons for attending Pacific Coast Dream Machines.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

The Weekly Driver Podcast gets support from www.americanmuscle.com.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 27:09
Episode 35, Honda drives into the future with Clarity https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/04/episode-35-honda-drives-into-the-future-with-clarity/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-35-honda-drives-into-the-future-with-clarity Tue, 01 May 2018 00:31:27 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29736 William Lai of Fremont, California, and Chris White of West Sacramento, California, are among early adopters to the Honda Clarity. Lai, who has owned three electrics cars, drives the all-electric variety. Walker drives the hydrogen-powered Clarity Fuel Cell. The Honda Clarity is currently only available in California and Oregon. Chris White drives a Honda Clarity Fuel Cell. It operates on hydrogen and has a 366-mile range. A pioneer in the alternative fuel vehicles (the original Insight debuted in 2000, a few months before the Toyota Prius) Honda has also equipped its new vehicles with Honda Sensing. It’s the carmaker’s “intelligent suite of safety and driver-assistance technologies designed to alert you to things you might miss while driving.” In Episode 35 of The Weekly Driver podcast below, hosts Bruce Alert and James Raia discuss with Lai and White their experiences with their new cars. Specifically, the two guests detail one component of Honda Sensing, the Collision Mitigation Braking System. It “applies brake pressure when an unavoidable collision is determined.” William Lai drives a Honda Clarity electric. It has an 89-mile range. Lai and White believe the system stopped potential catastrophe before it occurred. The two Clarity drivers also provide insight into their driving habits and how the Clarity fits into their respective lifestyles. White, director of communications at the California Fuel Cell Partnership in Sacramento, was the first person in Northern California to have the Clarity. Lai leased the electric trim after changing his mind from his intial interest in the Chevrolet Bolt. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues. William Lai of Fremont, California, and Chris White of West Sacramento, California, are among early adopters to the Honda Clarity. Lai, who has owned three electrics cars, drives the all-electric variety. Walker drives the hydrogen-powered Clarity Fuel...
The Honda Clarity is currently only available in California and Oregon.

Chris White drives a Honda Clarity Fuel Cell. It operates on hydrogen and has a 366-mile range.

A pioneer in the alternative fuel vehicles (the original Insight debuted in 2000, a few months before the Toyota Prius) Honda has also equipped its new vehicles with Honda Sensing. It’s the carmaker’s “intelligent suite of safety and driver-assistance technologies designed to alert you to things you might miss while driving.”

In Episode 35 of The Weekly Driver podcast below, hosts Bruce Alert and James Raia discuss with Lai and White their experiences with their new cars.

Specifically, the two guests detail one component of Honda Sensing, the Collision Mitigation Braking System. It “applies brake pressure when an unavoidable collision is determined.”

William Lai drives a Honda Clarity electric. It has an 89-mile range.

Lai and White believe the system stopped potential catastrophe before it occurred. The two Clarity drivers also provide insight into their driving habits and how the Clarity fits into their respective lifestyles.

White, director of communications at the California Fuel Cell Partnership in Sacramento, was the first person in Northern California to have the Clarity. Lai leased the electric trim after changing his mind from his intial interest in the Chevrolet Bolt.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and episode suggestions. Please also consider forwarding episode links to family, friends and colleagues.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 29:45
Episode 34, Journalist Ryan Brutt: Will travel for barn finds https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/04/episode-34-ryan/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-34-ryan Mon, 23 Apr 2018 22:17:26 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29687 Ryan Brutt is a writer and photographer who exudes enthusiasm about muscle cars. His interest is overtly apparent in his new book, Muscle Car Barn Finds. It details the art of automotive scavenger hunts. Brutt, self-described as an Automotive Archaeologist, lives in Chicago. The contributing rider to Hot Rod Magazine is our guest on Episode 34 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the book and Brutt’s trials and tribulations as he travels through several states on his mission to discover hundreds of often abandoned rarities. Consider Brutt’s premise: You’re driving along a country road in Alabama and something bright orange in nearby field attracts your attention. It’s parked near an old barn and partly covered in mildew. You pull into what remains of the driveway in the abandoned lot and your hunch is correct. It’s a 1966 Mustang Fastback. It looks neglected. But a good washing later, it’s presentable, and another vintage muscle car has a new life. The same scenario could involve a station wagon in Michigan, a Mercedes-Benz in Florida or a long-forgotten pick-up truck in Texas. They’re all known by the automotive colloquialism, Barn Finds. It’s the sub-set of muscle car barn finds Brutt honors in his new book of the same name. Sub-titled “Rusty Road Runners, Abandoned AMXs and Camaros and More!” (Motorbooks, $35), the 160-page hardback details the author’s treks to uncover muscle car enthusiasts’ dream machines. “These old warriors aren’t dead, just resting,” reads a segment of the book’s promotional material. “A drive in the country or through a small-town back street will reveal them lurking under tarps, hidden behind garage doors and stashed behind fences from prying eyes.” While traveling in eastern Tennessee, Brutt finds what he had long heard about but couldn’t believe until it appeared through some roadside hedges. Past a few roads of project cars in various shapes, sizes and degrees of disarray, a storage shed was home to an array of first-generation Corvettes. “In all my travels, I had never seen such a collection of really early Corvettes,” he writes. “There were three rows of them with three or four cars per row.” Brutt also details a no-so-pleasing occasion when he faced the wrath of a husband and wife, who, let’s say, didn’t exactly provide a warm welcome. In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and  Podtail All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com. We welcome your comments and suggestions for future episodes. Please also consider forwarding the episode links to family, friends and colleagues. **** Muscle Car Barn Finds is available on Amazon.com. Support TheWeeklyDriver.com by visiting the online shopping site from the banner below. It's ideal for all of your needs — books to automotive parts, electronics to last-minute gifts. We'll earn a small commission on your purchase(s). You’ll pay the same price as clicking directly to Amazon. Ryan Brutt is a writer and photographer who exudes enthusiasm about muscle cars. His interest is overtly apparent in his new book, Muscle Car Barn Finds. It details the art of automotive scavenger hunts. - Brutt,
Brutt, self-described as an Automotive Archaeologist, lives in Chicago. The contributing rider to Hot Rod Magazine is our guest on Episode 34 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the book and Brutt’s trials and tribulations as he travels through several states on his mission to discover hundreds of often abandoned rarities.

Consider Brutt’s premise: You’re driving along a country road in Alabama and something bright orange in nearby field attracts your attention. It’s parked near an old barn and partly covered in mildew. You pull into what remains of the driveway in the abandoned lot and your hunch is correct.

It’s a 1966 Mustang Fastback. It looks neglected. But a good washing later, it’s presentable, and another vintage muscle car has a new life. The same scenario could involve a station wagon in Michigan, a Mercedes-Benz in Florida or a long-forgotten pick-up truck in Texas.

They’re all known by the automotive colloquialism, Barn Finds. It’s the sub-set of muscle car barn finds Brutt honors in his new book of the same name.

Sub-titled “Rusty Road Runners, Abandoned AMXs and Camaros and More!” (Motorbooks, $35), the 160-page hardback details the author’s treks to uncover muscle car enthusiasts’ dream machines.

“These old warriors aren’t dead, just resting,” reads a segment of the book’s promotional material. “A drive in the country or through a small-town back street will reveal them lurking under tarps, hidden behind garage doors and stashed behind fences from prying eyes.”

While traveling in eastern Tennessee, Brutt finds what he had long heard about but couldn’t believe until it appeared through some roadside hedges. Past a few roads of project cars in various shapes, sizes and degrees of disarray, a storage shed was home to an array of first-generation Corvettes.

“In all my travels, I had never seen such a collection of really early Corvettes,” he writes. “There were three rows of them with three or four cars per row.”

Brutt also details a no-so-pleasing occasion when he faced the wrath of a husband and wife, who, let’s say, didn’t exactly provide a warm welcome.

In addition to its availability on this website, the Weekly Driver Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and  Podtail

All episodes of our podcasts are also archived on this website, TheWeeklyDriver.com.

We welcome your comments and suggestions for future episodes. Please also consider forwarding the episode links to family, friends and colleagues.

****

Muscle Car Barn Finds is available on Amazon.com. Support TheWeeklyDriver.com by visiting the online shopping site from the banner below. It's ideal for all of your needs — books to automotive parts, electronics to last-minute gifts. We'll earn a small commission on your purchase(s). You’ll pay the same price as clicking directly to Amazon.



]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean
Episode 33, Ethiopia to Sacramento: An Uber Success Story https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/04/episode-33-ethiopia-to-sacramento-an-uber-success-story/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-33-ethiopia-to-sacramento-an-uber-success-story Fri, 13 Apr 2018 22:48:01 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29649 Mulugeta Gebrewahid moved to Sacramento about seven years fago rom his native Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to be closer to his older brother. Known by friends and co-workers as Mule G (Moo-Lay G), the former warehouseman is a husband and father of seven children. He's active in the Sacramento community via the congregation at Faith Presbyterian Church. Mule is university educated, but he was unable to acquire a job in his engineering field in the United States, so he worked for several years in a warehouse. About four years ago, via the recommendation of a friend, Mule began driving for Uber. He tells his story in episode 33 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Mulugeta Gebrewahid, a native of Ethiopia, has supported his family as an Uber driver for the past four years. Image © James Raia/2015 With his outgoing personality and business savvy, Mule is ideally suited for his job. He enjoys meeting and talking with his customers. Because there’s a wider customer base for riding-sharing programs in larger metropolitan areas, Mule spends several days a week driving in San Francisco. He shares an apartment near San Francisco International Airport with friends. During this episode, Mule discusses a wide range of subjects: driving on the often chaotic streets of San Francisco to his wide range of customers and how Uber has changed during his tenure with the company. He enthusiastically shares some the unusual circumstances of the rides he’s provided. Mule also openly discusses his frustration with not being able to find employment to match his education. And he discusses his appreciation for his transition from a near minimum wage, often exhausting physical labor job, to supporting his family and as an independent businessman driving for Uber. He hopes to one day find employment using his university education. The Weekly Driver Podcast receives support from AmericanTrucks.com. Every episode of the podcast is archived on TheWeeklyDriver.com/podcast. We welcome comments and suggestions for our show. We also encourage listeners to share episode links on their social media platforms.     Mulugeta Gebrewahid moved to Sacramento about seven years fago rom his native Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to be closer to his older brother. Known by friends and co-workers as Mule G (Moo-Lay G), the former warehouseman is a husband and father of seven chil...
Mule is university educated, but he was unable to acquire a job in his engineering field in the United States, so he worked for several years in a warehouse. About four years ago, via the recommendation of a friend, Mule began driving for Uber. He tells his story in episode 33 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Mulugeta Gebrewahid, a native of Ethiopia, has supported his family as an Uber driver for the past four years. Image © James Raia/2015

With his outgoing personality and business savvy, Mule is ideally suited for his job. He enjoys meeting and talking with his customers. Because there’s a wider customer base for riding-sharing programs in larger metropolitan areas, Mule spends several days a week driving in San Francisco. He shares an apartment near San Francisco International Airport with friends.

During this episode, Mule discusses a wide range of subjects: driving on the often chaotic streets of San Francisco to his wide range of customers and how Uber has changed during his tenure with the company. He enthusiastically shares some the unusual circumstances of the rides he’s provided.

Mule also openly discusses his frustration with not being able to find employment to match his education. And he discusses his appreciation for his transition from a near minimum wage, often exhausting physical labor job, to supporting his family and as an independent businessman driving for Uber. He hopes to one day find employment using his university education.

The Weekly Driver Podcast receives support from AmericanTrucks.com.

Every episode of the podcast is archived on TheWeeklyDriver.com/podcast. We welcome comments and suggestions for our show. We also encourage listeners to share episode links on their social media platforms.

 

 ]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 27:46
Episode 32, Coolest show on earth for all things engines https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/04/episode-32/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-32 Sat, 07 Apr 2018 00:40:39 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29591 The Pacific Coast Dream Machines Show is a daylong festival of engines. Rare and sentimental cars, trucks, aircraft, law enforcement vehicles, tractors, busses, military machines and motorcycles, they're all showcased. Add lives band, food and beverage vendors to its moniker as “the coolest show earth,” ideally defines the upcoming 28th annual event scheduled from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m April 29 at Half Moon Bay Airport. The six-hour gathering is a “massive celebration of mechanical ingenuity, power and style.” And it’s the best bargain and with proceeds benefitting the Coastside Adult Day Health Center in Half Moon Bay. Hundreds of vintage cars will be on display at the 28th annual Pacific Coast Dreams Show, a festival of all things with engines, scheduled 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 29 at Half Moon Bay Airport. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2017 In Episode 32 of The Weekly Driver Podcast, hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the show with event chairman Chad Hooker. As Hooker explains and event literature describes, Pacific Coast Dream Machines is “a whimsical, fascinating, amusing, curious and absolutely unique show-and-tell spectacle featuring 2,000 magnificent driving, flying and working machines from the 20th and 21st centuries. “The world's coolest cars of every era and style, model-T fire engines, vintage busses, custom motorcycles, tricked out trucks, sleek streamliners, one-of-a-kind antique engines and tractors and historic military aircraft will be among the mesmerizing displays.” Vehicles on display will include: antique horseless carriages and Ford Model T's, fanciful touring and luxury cars, powerful sports cars, custom cars and street rods, muscle cars, vintage and modern era high-performance race cars. And quirky art and pedal cars, modified street machines with cutting edge styles, exotic high-performance cars, stylish European cars, ultra cool low-riders, sporty compacts, modified imports with flashy graphics, fashionable hip-hop urban show cars, homebuilt kit cars and super-charged turbo cars. Plus, there are “green” technology/alternative fuel vehicles, streamliners, dragsters, funny cars, gassers and jet cars. Among the attractions this year are Bob Senz’ Big Cacklefest. It will honor the show founder and a mass synchronized firing-up of the engines of all the magnificent machines on display at 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m. It's one of the west coast's biggest, baddest gatherings of the world's coolest cars. Spectators will get a rare up-close look of hundreds of aviation wonders, headlined by legendary vintage warbirds like the B-25 Bomber and C-47 Skytrain plus stylish homebuilts, classics from the ‘40s and ‘50s, sport and ultralight aircraft. To show a car, truck, motorcycle, aircraft or another machine, the registration fee is $40 ($50 for entries postmarked after April 15) and includes a dash plaque and admission for two people. Spectator admission is $25 in advance ($30 at the gate) for adults (age 18-64), $15 in advance ($20 at the gate) for ages 11-17 and 65+, Free for kids age 10 and under (with paying adult). Purchase tickets here. Parking at the event is included in the admission. There is a designated area for bicycle parking at the south end of the airport/Mezza Luna gate. Half Moon Bay Airport, 9850 N. Cabrillo Highway, Half Moon Bay CA 94019 is located on Highway 1, about 20 miles south of San Francisco and 5 miles north of Highway 92. For event information, call the info-line at 650-726-2328 or visit the website www.miramarevents.com/dreammachines The Weekly Driver Podcast is supported by AmericanTrucks.com. All back issues of the podcast are archived, here: The Weekly Driver Podcast We welcome comments and episode suggestions. Please forward this episode to friends, family and colleagues. The Pacific Coast Dream Machines Show is a daylong festival of engines. Rare and sentimental cars, trucks, aircraft, law enforcement vehicles, tractors, busses, military machines and motorcycles, they're all showcased. - Add lives band,
Add lives band, food and beverage vendors to its moniker as “the coolest show earth,” ideally defines the upcoming 28th annual event scheduled from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m April 29 at Half Moon Bay Airport.

The six-hour gathering is a “massive celebration of mechanical ingenuity, power and style.” And it’s the best bargain and with proceeds benefitting the Coastside Adult Day Health Center in Half Moon Bay.

Hundreds of vintage cars will be on display at the 28th annual Pacific Coast Dreams Show, a festival of all things with engines, scheduled 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 29 at Half Moon Bay Airport. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2017

In Episode 32 of The Weekly Driver Podcast, hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the show with event chairman Chad Hooker.

As Hooker explains and event literature describes, Pacific Coast Dream Machines is “a whimsical, fascinating, amusing, curious and absolutely unique show-and-tell spectacle featuring 2,000 magnificent driving, flying and working machines from the 20th and 21st centuries.

“The world's coolest cars of every era and style, model-T fire engines, vintage busses, custom motorcycles, tricked out trucks, sleek streamliners, one-of-a-kind antique engines and tractors and historic military aircraft will be among the mesmerizing displays.”

Vehicles on display will include: antique horseless carriages and Ford Model T's, fanciful touring and luxury cars, powerful sports cars, custom cars and street rods, muscle cars, vintage and modern era high-performance race cars.

And quirky art and pedal cars, modified street machines with cutting edge styles, exotic high-performance cars, stylish European cars, ultra cool low-riders, sporty compacts, modified imports with flashy graphics, fashionable hip-hop urban show cars, homebuilt kit cars and super-charged turbo cars.

Plus, there are “green” technology/alternative fuel vehicles, streamliners, dragsters, funny cars, gassers and jet cars.

Among the attractions this year are Bob Senz’ Big Cacklefest. It will honor the show founder and a mass synchronized firing-up of the engines of all the magnificent machines on display at 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m.

It's one of the west coast's biggest, baddest gatherings of the world's coolest cars. Spectators will get a rare up-close look of hundreds of aviation wonders, headlined by legendary vintage warbirds like the B-25 Bomber and C-47 Skytrain plus stylish homebuilts, classics from the ‘40s and ‘50s, sport and ultralight aircraft.

To show a car, truck, motorcycle, aircraft or another machine, the registration fee is $40 ($50 for entries postmarked after April 15) and includes a dash plaque and admission for two people.

Spectator admission is $25 in advance ($30 at the gate) for adults (age 18-64), $15 in advance ($20 at the gate) for ages 11-17 and 65+, Free for kids age 10 and under (with paying adult). Purchase tickets here.

Parking at the event is included in the admission. There is a designated area for bicycle parking at the south end of the airport/Mezza Luna gate.

Half Moon Bay Airport, 9850 N. Cabrillo Highway, Half Moon Bay CA 94019 is located on Highway 1, about 20 miles south of San Francisco and 5 miles north of Highway 92.

For event information, call the info-line at 650-726-2328 or visit the website www.miramarevents.com/dreammachines

The Weekly Driver Podcast is supported by https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29561 The 2018 Hyundai Ioniq is the first "green car" that can infiltrate the dominance of the Toyota Prius. The Ioniq is available in three modes — a traditional hybrid, full-electric and plug-in hybrid. The entry-level Ioniq plug-in hybrid Blue Line model is rated at 57 miles per gallon in city driving, 59 miles per gallon for highway treks. Its rating is several miles per gallon higher than the best mileage in the Prius lineup. In electric mode, the Ioniq has a 27-mile range. The efficient little machine can travel nearly 700 miles using gas only. The 2018 Hyundai Ioniq has a stylish exterior. Image @ James Raia/2018 Bruce Aldrich and I discuss the Ioniq in Episode 31 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Will the public buy the vehicle? How do its specs match up against the Prius? What else does the now two-year-old nameplate have to offer? In this episode, we also discuss one of the country’s unique industry shows, Pacific Coast Dream Machines. The year’s show is scheduled April 29 at the Half Moon Bay Airport, about 20 miles south of San Francisco. Now in its 28th year, Pacific Coast Dream Machines is “a massive celebration of mechanical ingenuity, power and style,” according to an event press release. The description fits. This year's show will be the entire topic of Episode 32 of podcast, and we'll also do live podcast interviews from the show. Custom choppers are featured in the Pacific Coast Dream Machines show scheduled April 29 at the Half Moon Bay Airport. Image courtesy of Miramar Events. The recent death of a woman in Tempe, Ariz., who was hit by a Volvo SUV used as an autonomous Uber vehicle remains in the news. Arizona and California have now stopped testing robot vehicles. Bruce and I discuss the dramatic video that shows the accident and how the various companies involved in the tragedy have reacted. As always, we appreciate you listening to our podcast. In addition to its weekly distribution on TheWeeklyDrive.com, the podcast is available for free on all major podcast platforms, including iTunes. All previous episodes are available here: The Weekly Driver Podcast. Please forward this episode to friends, family and colleagues. We welcome your comments. The 2018 Hyundai Ioniq is the first "green car" that can infiltrate the dominance of the Toyota Prius. The Ioniq is available in three modes — a traditional hybrid, full-electric and plug-in hybrid. - The entry-level Ioniq plug-in hybrid Blue Line mod...
The entry-level Ioniq plug-in hybrid Blue Line model is rated at 57 miles per gallon in city driving, 59 miles per gallon for highway treks.

Its rating is several miles per gallon higher than the best mileage in the Prius lineup. In electric mode, the Ioniq has a 27-mile range. The efficient little machine can travel nearly 700 miles using gas only.

The 2018 Hyundai Ioniq has a stylish exterior. Image @ James Raia/2018

Bruce Aldrich and I discuss the Ioniq in Episode 31 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Will the public buy the vehicle? How do its specs match up against the Prius? What else does the now two-year-old nameplate have to offer?

In this episode, we also discuss one of the country’s unique industry shows, Pacific Coast Dream Machines. The year’s show is scheduled April 29 at the Half Moon Bay Airport, about 20 miles south of San Francisco.

Now in its 28th year, Pacific Coast Dream Machines is “a massive celebration of mechanical ingenuity, power and style,” according to an event press release. The description fits. This year's show will be the entire topic of Episode 32 of podcast, and we'll also do live podcast interviews from the show.

Custom choppers are featured in the Pacific Coast Dream Machines show scheduled April 29 at the Half Moon Bay Airport. Image courtesy of Miramar Events.

The recent death of a woman in Tempe, Ariz., who was hit by a Volvo SUV used as an autonomous Uber vehicle remains in the news. Arizona and California have now stopped testing robot vehicles.

Bruce and I discuss the dramatic video that shows the accident and how the various companies involved in the tragedy have reacted.

As always, we appreciate you listening to our podcast. In addition to its weekly distribution on TheWeeklyDrive.com, the podcast is available for free on all major podcast platforms, including iTunes.

All previous episodes are available here: The Weekly Driver Podcast.

Please forward this episode to friends, family and colleagues. We welcome your comments.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 30:09
Episode 30, The strange case of death by Uber in Arizona https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/03/episode-30-the-strange-case-of-death-by-uber-in-arizona/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-30-the-strange-case-of-death-by-uber-in-arizona Wed, 28 Mar 2018 00:12:35 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29513 Nearly two weeks after a woman was killed by an autonomous Uber vehicle while walking her bicycle across the street at night and outside of a crosswalk in Tempe, Ariz., much is still unknown about the accident. What is known is that the Governor of Arizona has ended the state's autonomous vehicle testing program. The Volvo SUV used as an autonomous Uber vehicle in Tempe, Arizona, that killed a woman pushing a bicycle late at night and outside of a crosswalk. The auto-parts maker that supplied the radar and camera on the Volvo SUV that killed the woman has stated they had disabled the standard collision-avoidance technology in the vehicle. The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been investigating the case since. The local police chief initially called the incident "unavoidable." But opinions changed after the release of a crash video, which depicts internal and external views of the Uber vehicle. It also shows the car's safety driver looking down away from the road as a pedestrian suddenly emerges into the headlights. Bruce Aldrich and I discuss the tragedy in Episode #30 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Bruce adds thoughtful insight into the situation, particularly his opinion on the future of autonomous driving. Also in Episode #30, we discuss the 2018 Toyota Land Cruiser and my experience driving the large SUV about 425 miles during a round-trip excursion from Sacramento to Fresno. The Land Cruiser is a gas sucker, but it's a beautiful, well-appointed small apartment on four wheels. The Weekly Driver Podcast is available for download on all major podcast formats. Please distribute this episode to friends via email and post it to your social media accounts. We would like to acknowledge our continuing upport from AmericanMuscle.com. And we look forward to hearing from our readers and listeners about our podcast. Future topic ideas are always welcomed. All previous episodes of the podcast are available here, The Weekly Driver Podcast Nearly two weeks after a woman was killed by an autonomous Uber vehicle while walking her bicycle across the street at night and outside of a crosswalk in Tempe, Ariz., much is still unknown about the accident. -
What is known is that the Governor of Arizona has ended the state's autonomous vehicle testing program.

The Volvo SUV used as an autonomous Uber vehicle in Tempe, Arizona, that killed a woman pushing a bicycle late at night and outside of a crosswalk.

The auto-parts maker that supplied the radar and camera on the Volvo SUV that killed the woman has stated they had disabled the standard collision-avoidance technology in the vehicle.

The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been investigating the case since.

The local police chief initially called the incident "unavoidable." But opinions changed after the release of a crash video, which depicts internal and external views of the Uber vehicle. It also shows the car's safety driver looking down away from the road as a pedestrian suddenly emerges into the headlights.

Bruce Aldrich and I discuss the tragedy in Episode #30 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. Bruce adds thoughtful insight into the situation, particularly his opinion on the future of autonomous driving.

Also in Episode #30, we discuss the 2018 Toyota Land Cruiser and my experience driving the large SUV about 425 miles during a round-trip excursion from Sacramento to Fresno. The Land Cruiser is a gas sucker, but it's a beautiful, well-appointed small apartment on four wheels.

The Weekly Driver Podcast is available for download on all major podcast formats. Please distribute this episode to friends via email and post it to your social media accounts.

We would like to acknowledge our continuing upport from AmericanMuscle.com.

And we look forward to hearing from our readers and listeners about our podcast. Future topic ideas are always welcomed.

All previous episodes of the podcast are available here, The Weekly Driver Podcast]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 22:56
Episode 29, Stunning new Lexus, bad tires and RV woes https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/03/episode-29-stunning-new-lexus-bad-tires-and-rv-woes/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-29-stunning-new-lexus-bad-tires-and-rv-woes Sat, 17 Mar 2018 18:25:35 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29467 The 2018 Lexus LC 500 is arguably the most attractive car made in the past several years. It turns heads in parking lots and gets stared at on the open road. Strangers point at it and give a thumb's up. The new Lexus belongs on the list of the 100 most attractive cars ever made. It would be among the few modern-day vehicles on the subjective selections automotive publications publish about every 10 years. The stunning new 2018 Lexus LC 500. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2018 Bruce Aldrich, co-host of The Weekly Driver Podcast, and I shared driving duties in the new Lexus from Sacramento to the Delta hamlet of Courtland and back last week. We were on assignment at Hemly Cider, the craft cider maker. We discuss the new top-of-the-line Lexus in Episode #29 of our podcast. Succinctly stated, the LC 500 is beautifully crafted inside and out. It's automobile design at its finest. Also in this episode: I write a weekly automotive column for Bay Area News Group in San Francisco region. I get e-mail letters from time to time and in recent weeks, a few emails were of particular interest. The new Lexus has run-flat tires. The timing was ideal because one reader of my column suggested I always include information of the type of tires included on new cars. The reader expressed her frustration with bad experiences with run-flat tires — their expense and lousy longevity. A recent column I wrote about the RV industry and its continuing problems was well-received and several readers e-mailed detailing their issues with sub-par manufacturing and difficulty getting satisfactory repairs. Thank you for listening to our podcast. All previous episodes are archived and available here . . . The Weekly Driver Podcast. If you like what we do, please forward the link to family, friends and colleagues and repost the podcast link to your social media outlets. The 2018 Lexus LC 500 is arguably the most attractive car made in the past several years. It turns heads in parking lots and gets stared at on the open road. Strangers point at it and give a thumb's up. -
The new Lexus belongs on the list of the 100 most attractive cars ever made. It would be among the few modern-day vehicles on the subjective selections automotive publications publish about every 10 years.

The stunning new 2018 Lexus LC 500. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2018

Bruce Aldrich, co-host of The Weekly Driver Podcast, and I shared driving duties in the new Lexus from Sacramento to the Delta hamlet of Courtland and back last week. We were on assignment at Hemly Cider, the craft cider maker.

We discuss the new top-of-the-line Lexus in Episode #29 of our podcast. Succinctly stated, the LC 500 is beautifully crafted inside and out. It's automobile design at its finest.

Also in this episode: I write a weekly automotive column for Bay Area News Group in San Francisco region. I get e-mail letters from time to time and in recent weeks, a few emails were of particular interest.

The new Lexus has run-flat tires. The timing was ideal because one reader of my column suggested I always include information of the type of tires included on new cars. The reader expressed her frustration with bad experiences with run-flat tires — their expense and lousy longevity.

A recent column I wrote about the RV industry and its continuing problems was well-received and several readers e-mailed detailing their issues with sub-par manufacturing and difficulty getting satisfactory repairs.

Thank you for listening to our podcast. All previous episodes are archived and available here . . . The Weekly Driver Podcast.

If you like what we do, please forward the link to family, friends and colleagues and repost the podcast link to your social media outlets.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 23:35
Episode 28, Rats eating cars, winter driving, Genesis shines https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/03/episode-28-rats-eating-cars-winter-driving-genesis-shines/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-28-rats-eating-cars-winter-driving-genesis-shines Fri, 09 Mar 2018 02:46:20 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29419 If you live near a river and your vehicle is parked outside and near trees, there's likely one more reason to be concerned about its welfare — rats. Owners of cars from several manufacturers are increasingly reporting that rodents are eating their vehicles from the inside out. Reports in several states by owners of Honda and Toyota vehicles, as well as other carmakers' models, are claiming rats are devouring the wiring in their cars and causing major costly repairs.  The problem, owners claim, is that "green car" concerns have resulted in manufacturers using soy-based engine wiring and coverings. Rats eating engine wiring is an increasing problem for vehicle owners. Several lawsuits have been filed, with Honda and Toyota stating the litigations have no merit. But several years ago, Honda introduced a rodent-deterrent tape to help with the issue. Toyota has not further commented. The soy alternative used by car companies is an eco-friendly alternative to wrapping wires and car parts in plastic. Hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the rodent problems in cars below in Episode #28 of The Weekly Driver Podcast Also in this episode, we discuss: * Winter driving can be frightening. We detail guidelines and commonsense practices while driving in inclement weather as well as the benefits of vehicles with four-wheel drive and all-wheel drive. * Bruce and his with Alene recently returned from their third time renting an RV. Bruce talks about getting more experience behind the wheel in the increasingly popular way to travel on vacation. * Genesis, new luxury brand began as a Hyundai Genesis, has been praised since its debut 2017 models. Now, the Genesis has received another top honor. It's rated as the top overall pick by Consumer Reports. Genesis has accelerated past Audi followed by BMW, Lexus and Porsche in the top 5. The remainder of the top 10 in order: Subaru, Kia, Tesla, Honda and Toyota. We invite you to listen to previous episodes here: The Weekly Driver Podcast And we welcome your comments and hope you subscribe. If you live near a river and your vehicle is parked outside and near trees, there's likely one more reason to be concerned about its welfare — rats. Owners of cars from several manufacturers are increasingly reporting that rodents are eating their vehi...
Reports in several states by owners of Honda and Toyota vehicles, as well as other carmakers' models, are claiming rats are devouring the wiring in their cars and causing major costly repairs.  The problem, owners claim, is that "green car" concerns have resulted in manufacturers using soy-based engine wiring and coverings.

Rats eating engine wiring is an increasing problem for vehicle owners.

Several lawsuits have been filed, with Honda and Toyota stating the litigations have no merit. But several years ago, Honda introduced a rodent-deterrent tape to help with the issue. Toyota has not further commented.

The soy alternative used by car companies is an eco-friendly alternative to wrapping wires and car parts in plastic.

Hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss the rodent problems in cars below in Episode #28 of The Weekly Driver Podcast

Also in this episode, we discuss:

* Winter driving can be frightening. We detail guidelines and commonsense practices while driving in inclement weather as well as the benefits of vehicles with four-wheel drive and all-wheel drive.

* Bruce and his with Alene recently returned from their third time renting an RV. Bruce talks about getting more experience behind the wheel in the increasingly popular way to travel on vacation.

* Genesis, new luxury brand began as a Hyundai Genesis, has been praised since its debut 2017 models. Now, the Genesis has received another top honor. It's rated as the top overall pick by Consumer Reports. Genesis has accelerated past Audi followed by BMW, Lexus and Porsche in the top 5. The remainder of the top 10 in order: Subaru, Kia, Tesla, Honda and Toyota.

We invite you to listen to previous episodes here: The Weekly Driver Podcast

And we welcome your comments and hope you subscribe.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 22:59
Episode 27, The legacy of one family’s 1986 Chrysler Lebaron https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/02/episode-27-karen/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-27-karen Fri, 23 Feb 2018 22:48:36 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29328 Thirty-two years ago, Karen Saylor's parents drove into a downtown Sacramento, California, car dealership and drove away in a new 1986 turbocharged Chrysler Lebaron convertible. Like the legacies of many family cars, Karen Saylor fondly recalls going shopping with mother with the Lebaron’s convertible top down. She remembers trips to the Monterey Peninsula when mother and daughter had their hair blowing in the wind. Karan Saylor is the owner of a 1986 Chrysler Lebaron convertible. All images © Bruce Aldrich/2018 A neighbor in East Sacramento, Saylor is our guest on episode #27 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. She recalls a lot about how much cars meant to her parents and to her husband with whom she owned several Ford Thunderbirds. The Lebaron has a lot of history and Saylor is happy to share it. Saylor’s parents are deceased as is her husband. The T-birds are gone, but the Chrysler Lebaron remains. It’s beautiful, and it’s homage to the craftsmanship of the cars of the era. This pristine 1986 Chrysler Lebaron is for sale in East Sacramento. While an SUV is now Saylor’s daily driver, she still drives the Lebaron. It always attracts attention. It’s in fine shape and has been driven only 48,000 miles in 32 years or about 1,500 miles per year. It has all of its original documentation and service records. Saylor has decided it’s time to sell the Lebaron. She's asking $5,000. If interested, please contact theweeklydriver.com at james@jamesraia.com and I will forward the information to the car’s owner. Thirty-two years ago, Karen Saylor's parents drove into a downtown Sacramento, California, car dealership and drove away in a new 1986 turbocharged Chrysler Lebaron convertible. - Like the legacies of many family cars,
Like the legacies of many family cars, Karen Saylor fondly recalls going shopping with mother with the Lebaron’s convertible top down. She remembers trips to the Monterey Peninsula when mother and daughter had their hair blowing in the wind.

Karan Saylor is the owner of a 1986 Chrysler Lebaron convertible. All images © Bruce Aldrich/2018









A neighbor in East Sacramento, Saylor is our guest on episode #27 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. She recalls a lot about how much cars meant to her parents and to her husband with whom she owned several Ford Thunderbirds. The Lebaron has a lot of history and Saylor is happy to share it.

Saylor’s parents are deceased as is her husband. The T-birds are gone, but the Chrysler Lebaron remains. It’s beautiful, and it’s homage to the craftsmanship of the cars of the era.

This pristine 1986 Chrysler Lebaron is for sale in East Sacramento.

While an SUV is now Saylor’s daily driver, she still drives the Lebaron. It always attracts attention. It’s in fine shape and has been driven only 48,000 miles in 32 years or about 1,500 miles per year. It has all of its original documentation and service records.

Saylor has decided it’s time to sell the Lebaron. She's asking $5,000. If interested, please contact theweeklydriver.com at james@jamesraia.com and I will forward the information to the car’s owner.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 23:05
Episode 26, picky buyer looks for 6 months, buys 2018 VW Atlas https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/02/episode-26-picky-buyer-looks-6-months-buys-2018-vw-atlas/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-26-picky-buyer-looks-6-months-buys-2018-vw-atlas Sat, 17 Feb 2018 01:34:55 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29304 Several months ago, Chris Wood decided it was time for a new vehicle. He has a family, including four grandchildren, a 50-pound dog and a 5,000-pound ski boat and equipment to haul. He had $50,000 to spend, but he was faced with a lingering dilemma. Wood, 63, of Pleasanton, a retired Silicon Valley computer salesman, looked for six months but couldn't find a new sports utility vehicle that fit his criteria and could match the quality his previous vehicle, a 1999 Ford Explorer. Chris Wood of Pleasanton, California shopped for an SUV for six months before buying a 2018 Volkswagen Altas. Images © James Raia/2018. “I had it for 19 years; I serviced it all the time,” said Wood. “I put in transmissions and took care a lot of the things and kept it running. My dad gave me enough confidence introducing me to everything. He showed me how to rebuild a carburetor on a lawn mower so could learn how to do things myself." With his long, satisfying experience with Ford, Wood could have purchased another Explorer. But for 2018 he said the carmaker charges $600 for upgraded white paint. The basic white paint option was eliminated. “I just had an aversion to paying $600 for paint,” he said. Wood looked for used vehicles, but finding a well-built trailer hitch proved futile. Third-row seating was important and a cargo area large enough for a dog cage. He didn’t want a white interior. Dodge, Honda and Toyota choices were eliminated for various reasons, including not wanting the expense and impractical issues of leather seats. The 2018 Volkswagen Atlas included 95 percent of what Chris Wood was seeking in a new sport utility vehicle for his family, dog and boat. “I really wanted an upscale cloth interior,” said Wood. “Maybe I’m the only guy on the planet who likes a cloth interior. I would have paid a leather price for a cloth interior. It’s comfortable. The 19-year-old cloth interior of my Ford Explorer was in great shape the day I sold it. Plus you can’t find five-year-old leather that looks good, in my opinion.” Wood recently purchased a 2018 Volkswagen Atlas, a debut SUV and his first VW. He provided a list of 16 pros and seven cons after driving the vehicle for 1,500 miles. He meticulously studies the owner’s manual and has about two-dozen colored tabs on various sections. He has other sections marked in red for more tabs after additional reading. Among the features Wood appreciates in his new Atlas is the standard trailer hitch and better position than after-market options. The transmission shift points are good for daily driving. The rear seat tilt with a child’s seat installed is superior. Wood is also impressed with the infotainment system, the 360-degree camera, the large navigation screen, the logical and easy-to-understand changes and settings and the automatic engine start-stop function. Expensive accessories, including the $600 side rail and the cost of installation as well and the $300 cargo cover, $320 roof rails and $300 ski rack are cons. Wood doesn’t appreciate the manufacturer's obsession with warning proclamations throughout the owner's manual. He suggests a section for owners who to do their own maintenance and repair. "Give me a break," Wood noted. "Let Darwin's laws prevail." Like many car enthusiasts, Wood’s fascination with cars began with a family vehicle from his youth. His mother and father saved their money and purchased a 1966 Buick Skylark demo model. His family took two cross-country trips in the Skylark, pulling a camper-trailer. “I tend to be pretty analytical,” Wood said. “My wife and I bought an RV a couple of years ago. We looked for a year for it. We thought about it and really studied and analyzed it. How are we going to use it? What do our friends say who've owned RVs?" With his new purchase, Wood is 95 percent satisfied. "It's an excellent vehicle," he said. "I just want people to know about it." Several months ago, Chris Wood decided it was time for a new vehicle. He has a family, including four grandchildren, a 50-pound dog and a 5,000-pound ski boat and equipment to haul. He had $50,000 to spend, but he was faced with a lingering dilemma.
Wood, 63, of Pleasanton, a retired Silicon Valley computer salesman, looked for six months but couldn't find a new sports utility vehicle that fit his criteria and could match the quality his previous vehicle, a 1999 Ford Explorer.

Chris Wood of Pleasanton, California shopped for an SUV for six months before buying a 2018 Volkswagen Altas. Images © James Raia/2018.

“I had it for 19 years; I serviced it all the time,” said Wood. “I put in transmissions and took care a lot of the things and kept it running. My dad gave me enough confidence introducing me to everything. He showed me how to rebuild a carburetor on a lawn mower so could learn how to do things myself."

With his long, satisfying experience with Ford, Wood could have purchased another Explorer. But for 2018 he said the carmaker charges $600 for upgraded white paint. The basic white paint option was eliminated. “I just had an aversion to paying $600 for paint,” he said.

Wood looked for used vehicles, but finding a well-built trailer hitch proved futile. Third-row seating was important and a cargo area large enough for a dog cage. He didn’t want a white interior. Dodge, Honda and Toyota choices were eliminated for various reasons, including not wanting the expense and impractical issues of leather seats.

The 2018 Volkswagen Atlas included 95 percent of what Chris Wood was seeking in a new sport utility vehicle for his family, dog and boat.

“I really wanted an upscale cloth interior,” said Wood. “Maybe I’m the only guy on the planet who likes a cloth interior. I would have paid a leather price for a cloth interior. It’s comfortable. The 19-year-old cloth interior of my Ford Explorer was in great shape the day I sold it. Plus you can’t find five-year-old leather that looks good, in my opinion.”

Wood recently purchased a 2018 Volkswagen Atlas, a debut SUV and his first VW. He provided a list of 16 pros and seven cons after driving the vehicle for 1,500 miles. He meticulously studies the owner’s manual and has about two-dozen colored tabs on various sections. He has other sections marked in red for more tabs after additional reading.

Among the features Wood appreciates in his new Atlas is the standard trailer hitch and better position than after-market options. The transmission shift points are good for daily driving. The rear seat tilt with a child’s seat installed is superior.

Wood is also impressed with the infotainment system, the 360-degree camera, the large navigation screen, the logical and easy-to-understand changes and settings and the automatic engine start-stop function.

Expensive accessories, including the $600 side rail and the cost of installation as well and the $300 cargo cover, $320 roof rails and $300 ski rack are cons. Wood doesn’t appreciate the manufacturer's obsession with warning proclamations throughout the owner's manual. He suggests a section for owners who to do their own maintenance and repair.

"Give me a break," Wood noted. "Let Darwin's laws prevail."

Like many car enthusiasts, Wood’s fascination with cars began with a family vehicle from his youth. His mother and father saved their money and purchased a 1966 Buick Skylark demo model. His family took two cross-country trips in the Skylark, pulling a camper-trailer.

“I tend to be pretty analytical,” Wood said. “My wife and I bought an RV a couple of years ago. We looked for a year for it. We thought about it and really studied and analyzed it. How are we going to use it?]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean
Episode 25, RV expert believes industry needs major repairs https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/02/episode-25-rv-expert-believes-industry-needs-major-repairs/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-25-rv-expert-believes-industry-needs-major-repairs Mon, 05 Feb 2018 05:01:40 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29249 Chuck Woodbury, editor and publisher of the RVTravel.com, the industry's largest and most prestigious online publication, is a full-time RVer and an industry advocate. But Woodbury says RV buyers must beware. The RV industry, with record sales in 2017, needs to better protect the best interests of buyers. The RV industry needs to better protect the interests buyers, according to Chuck Woodbury, editor and publisher of RVTravel.com. Woodbury, an author, internationally renowned RV industry expert and the host of the best-selling Better Business Bureau DVD, “Buying a Recreational Vehicle,” is the guest on episode 25 of The Weekly Driver Podcast. "There's no international organization anymore that looks out for the interest of RVers," says Woodury. "There's nobody back in Washington, D.C., or in state legislatures lobbying for lemon laws for RVers. The only lobbying that's going on is against lemon laws. The dealers and the manufacturers do not want lemon laws. It means they have to build better RVs pr take them back and they don't want to do that." According to Recreational Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA) in Reston, Va., wholesale shipments increased 17.2 percent in 2017 from the previous year. Motorhome shipments increased 14.4 percent last year from 2016 totals. But while industry sales highlight the industry's boom, it's also fostered growing concerns of decreasing manufacturing quality. "To me, it's a huge problem," says Woodbury, who frequently receives letters from readers of his website and RV Travel Newsletter about catastrophic issues. "I am probably the only voice out there who is trying to get the companies to do something more to improve their products." Woodbury, who's traveled throughout the world as an RVer for more than 30 years, believes manufacturers and dealers entice potential buyers with increasingly advanced equipment and furnishing and with low long-term financing. But it's rarely in the best interests of customers. "Many of manufacturers today do not even to do a final inspection before the RVs off to dealers," Woodbury warns. "It's up to the dealers to find problems. Some dealers will go and look through their inventory find problems. Other dealers just look the other way." Further troublesome is a lack of qualified assistance for RVers whose vehicles need repair. "There's a huge shortage of RV technicians, says Woodbury. "Generally, the dealers don't pay very well, so it can be very difficult to get an RV fixed. We hear horror stories all the time about people buying RVs riddled with defects. It can take months to get an RV repaired. I feel sorry for people who have paid $100,000 or $200,000 or a new RV and they can't use it." In addition to discussing the industry’s shortcomings, Woodbury also discusses new trends in RV industry, the increase of different groups buying RVs and other changes in the RV community. Chuck Woodbury, editor and publisher of the RVTravel.com, the industry's largest and most prestigious online publication, is a full-time RVer and an industry advocate. But Woodbury says RV buyers must beware. - The RV industry, RVTravel.com, the industry's largest and most prestigious online publication, is a full-time RVer and an industry advocate. But Woodbury says RV buyers must beware.

The RV industry, with record sales in 2017, needs to better protect the best interests of buyers.

The RV industry needs to better protect the interests buyers, according to Chuck Woodbury, editor and publisher of RVTravel.com.

Woodbury, an author, internationally renowned RV industry expert and the host of the best-selling Better Business Bureau DVD, “Buying a Recreational Vehicle,” is the guest on episode 25 of The Weekly Driver Podcast.

"There's no international organization anymore that looks out for the interest of RVers," says Woodury. "There's nobody back in Washington, D.C., or in state legislatures lobbying for lemon laws for RVers. The only lobbying that's going on is against lemon laws. The dealers and the manufacturers do not want lemon laws. It means they have to build better RVs pr take them back and they don't want to do that."

According to Recreational Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA) in Reston, Va., wholesale shipments increased 17.2 percent in 2017 from the previous year. Motorhome shipments increased 14.4 percent last year from 2016 totals.

But while industry sales highlight the industry's boom, it's also fostered growing concerns of decreasing manufacturing quality.

"To me, it's a huge problem," says Woodbury, who frequently receives letters from readers of his website and RV Travel Newsletter about catastrophic issues. "I am probably the only voice out there who is trying to get the companies to do something more to improve their products."

Woodbury, who's traveled throughout the world as an RVer for more than 30 years, believes manufacturers and dealers entice potential buyers with increasingly advanced equipment and furnishing and with low long-term financing. But it's rarely in the best interests of customers.

"Many of manufacturers today do not even to do a final inspection before the RVs off to dealers," Woodbury warns. "It's up to the dealers to find problems. Some dealers will go and look through their inventory find problems. Other dealers just look the other way."

Further troublesome is a lack of qualified assistance for RVers whose vehicles need repair.

"There's a huge shortage of RV technicians, says Woodbury. "Generally, the dealers don't pay very well, so it can be very difficult to get an RV fixed. We hear horror stories all the time about people buying RVs riddled with defects. It can take months to get an RV repaired. I feel sorry for people who have paid $100,000 or $200,000 or a new RV and they can't use it."

In addition to discussing the industry’s shortcomings, Woodbury also discusses new trends in RV industry, the increase of different groups buying RVs and other changes in the RV community.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 33:53
Episode 24, Eric Wohlberg: cycling champion, vintage Buick driver https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/01/episode-24-eric-wohlberg-cycling-champion-vintage-buick-driver/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-24-eric-wohlberg-cycling-champion-vintage-buick-driver Mon, 29 Jan 2018 19:40:29 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29230 Eric Wohlberg spent more than a decade traveling around the world to compete on two wheels. He participated in three Summer Olympics for Canada and won multiple cycling national individual time trial titles and stage races. But Wohlberg, 53, of San Jose, in his sixth year as a director for the Rally Cycling Team, now prefers four-wheel transportation. He often travels to the team's camp and its races in the United States and his native country while driving one of his two vintage cars. Eric Wohlberg and his beloved 1964 Buick LeSabre estate wagon. Images © James Raia/2018 Since 1990, Wohlberg has owned a 1965 Mustang Fastback. For his 50th birthday, he purchased a 1964 Buick LeSabre estate station wagon. “I think every man over the age 50 should be driving a Buick of some sort,” Wohlberg said recently during the team’s recent pre-season training camp along beachfront property in Oxnard. “It’s a rite of passage.” The well-worn interior of Eric Wohlberg's 1964 Buick LeSabre estate wagon. “Right now, that wagon is driving down property values. The place where it’s parked in front of is for sale, so that house is probably going for $15,000 or $20,000 less. I am sure the owner will be happy when it’s not there.” Wohlberg’s interest in vintage cars and their repairs dates to his youth. He was raised on a wheat farm in Saskatchewan where his family had to be self-sufficient. His father led the way. The creatively done, makeshift engine of the Eric Wohlberg's 1964 Buick LeSabre estate wagon. “If something broke, you had to fix it; that’s all there is to it,” said Wohlberg. “I just had that same farm-boy mentality. If something breaks, you do your best to fix it. Sometimes it might break a little worse when you are trying to fix it. But that’s how it goes. It’s a never-say-die attitude.” Wohlberg is humble. While not equipped at his home to do total rebuilds, but he knows his cars well and does most of the repairs. Monterey Auto Week, the yearly international pilgrimage in August to all things automotive is among Wohlberg’s favorite weeks of the year. He camps on the beach in the station wagon with his girlfriend and absorbs the car culture. “It’s amazing the attention my car gets down there,” Wohlberg said. “Once all the Lamborghinis and Ferraris are judged, I can score 9 1/2s and 10s with my station wagon. With my Mustang, people always want to know if it’s for sale. I’ve had a couple of offers for the wagon. It’s a beautiful wagon and they’re kind of coming back into style." Wohlberg’s description ideally defines the term, “beauty in the eye of the beholder.” The engine compartment is a collection of mismatched parts, the fodder of creative mechanics. The exterior is weathered. The interior is old and worn. The driver’s seat floor mat bears the image of a road runner. A religious figurine rest in the center of the dash, accompanied by a plastic toy rifle. What's not to like? “It’s a fun old car; it’s a little rough," Wohlbeg said. "It’s a 50 or maybe even a 100-footer. But it gets the job done. I can haul a lot of stuff in it. I beat it up; it’s perfect for the foul weather on highways 101 and 880.” Eric Wohlberg spent more than a decade traveling around the world to compete on two wheels. He participated in three Summer Olympics for Canada and won multiple cycling national individual time trial titles and stage races. - But Wohlberg, 53,
But Wohlberg, 53, of San Jose, in his sixth year as a director for the Rally Cycling Team, now prefers four-wheel transportation. He often travels to the team's camp and its races in the United States and his native country while driving one of his two vintage cars.

Eric Wohlberg and his beloved 1964 Buick LeSabre estate wagon. Images © James Raia/2018

Since 1990, Wohlberg has owned a 1965 Mustang Fastback. For his 50th birthday, he purchased a 1964 Buick LeSabre estate station wagon.

“I think every man over the age 50 should be driving a Buick of some sort,” Wohlberg said recently during the team’s recent pre-season training camp along beachfront property in Oxnard. “It’s a rite of passage.”

The well-worn interior of Eric Wohlberg's 1964 Buick LeSabre estate wagon.

“Right now, that wagon is driving down property values. The place where it’s parked in front of is for sale, so that house is probably going for $15,000 or $20,000 less. I am sure the owner will be happy when it’s not there.”

Wohlberg’s interest in vintage cars and their repairs dates to his youth. He was raised on a wheat farm in Saskatchewan where his family had to be self-sufficient. His father led the way.

The creatively done, makeshift engine of the Eric Wohlberg's 1964 Buick LeSabre estate wagon.

“If something broke, you had to fix it; that’s all there is to it,” said Wohlberg. “I just had that same farm-boy mentality. If something breaks, you do your best to fix it. Sometimes it might break a little worse when you are trying to fix it. But that’s how it goes. It’s a never-say-die attitude.”

Wohlberg is humble. While not equipped at his home to do total rebuilds, but he knows his cars well and does most of the repairs.

Monterey Auto Week, the yearly international pilgrimage in August to all things automotive is among Wohlberg’s favorite weeks of the year. He camps on the beach in the station wagon with his girlfriend and absorbs the car culture.

“It’s amazing the attention my car gets down there,” Wohlberg said. “Once all the Lamborghinis and Ferraris are judged, I can score 9 1/2s and 10s with my station wagon. With my Mustang, people always want to know if it’s for sale. I’ve had a couple of offers for the wagon. It’s a beautiful wagon and they’re kind of coming back into style."

Wohlberg’s description ideally defines the term, “beauty in the eye of the beholder.”

The engine compartment is a collection of mismatched parts, the fodder of creative mechanics. The exterior is weathered. The interior is old and worn. The driver’s seat floor mat bears the image of a road runner. A religious figurine rest in the center of the dash, accompanied by a plastic toy rifle. What's not to like?

“It’s a fun old car; it’s a little rough," Wohlbeg said. "It’s a 50 or maybe even a 100-footer. But it gets the job done. I can haul a lot of stuff in it. I beat it up; it’s perfect for the foul weather on highways 101 and 880.”]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 22:37
Episode 23, Going mobile at CES with electric bikes, scooters https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/01/episode-23-going-mobile-ces-electric-bikes-scooters/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-23-going-mobile-ces-electric-bikes-scooters Thu, 18 Jan 2018 02:43:00 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29200 Autonomous cars, trucks and helicopters, drones and virtual reality technology are at the center of the current whirlwind of technology innovation. But personal light electric vehicles (PLEVs) are also increasingly abundant. They're compact, often foldable and easily transportable in boats, planes, automobiles and RVs. They’re the scooters, simple bicycles and mopeds of yesteryear gone electric and grouped under the umbrella term “personal transporters.” And they're used as complementary transportation for travelers or stand-alone vehicles for leisure treks and short commutes. Electric bikes and other personal mobility transportation systems were prominent at the recent Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Image  © Bruce Aldricch/2018 More than a dozen domestic and international PLEV companies, and at least two with agreements with Ford Motor Company, showcased their new machines at the recent Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. Here are three examples of new mobility options, simple to futuristic-looking: Headquartered in Fremont and manufactured in Ann Arbor, Mich., GenZe electric bikes (www.genze.com) include three ride modes, travel as much as 50 miles per charge and have a removable battery for portable recharging. The Ujet electric scooter from Luxembourge has advanced technology and folds up into a case similar ro the size of a carry-on suitcased. Image © Bruce Alrdich/2018 Bike lane and public transit friendly, GenZe electric bikes are legal transportation where conventional bicycles are legal. The e-bikes have a maximum speed of 18 miles per hour and include a 345 watt-hour lithium-ion battery. A display shows riders their current speed and battery charge level. Prices range from $1,599 to $1,899 and the bikes weight 46 pounds. GenZe also has a lineup of electric scooters, starting at $2,999. Available since last June, GenZe recently collaborated with Motivate International, the operator of the Bay Area’s regional bike share system, and Ford’s GoBike program. A fleet of 250 GenZe bikes will be added in April to the current e-bike network in San Francisco. Riders can locate GenZe e-Bikes using the Ford GoBike application. Renting and returning the e-bikes from any location in San Francisco is available using Clipper smart card or mobile phone. Ojo Scooters offered a variety of retro-styes scooters. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2018 Marketed as offering clean, sustainable and silent transportation for city dwellers, Ujet (www.ujet.com) debuted its lineup of electric scooters at CES. The futuristic design includes spoke-free wheels, a stealth frame, elaborate technology an weighs 31 pounds all in an easy-to-use foldable system. Manufactured in Germany and headquartered Luxembourg, the Ujet is high-tech but easily transportable. The scooter includes a built-in HD dash camera, two USB ports as well as Bluetooth and GPS connectivity. The scooter can be paired with a smartphone using a telematics app, with wifi and 4G connectivity. The Ujet scooter can mount two separate batteries. The smaller battery has a 43-mile range, the larger battery has a 93-mile range. The top speed is 28 miles per hour. Eco, normal and sport driving modes are offered, and the Ujet has a payload of 275 pounds. Costs range from $8,900-$9,900. Technology makes the Ujet impressively user-friendly. The Android or iOS applications provide instructions for available parking. The app also monitors the scooter’s performance, including battery level, mileage and saved carbon dioxide emissions. With a range of up to 50 miles, dual suspension and an array of retro designs, the Ojo electric scooter packs a lot into its stealthy aluminum frame. Headquartered in Oxnard, Ojo scooters (www.ojoelectric.com) have a rigid construction for ride stabilization and a top speed of 20 miles per hour. An add-on battery doubles the range. There's a dashboard touchscreen and Bluetooth connectivity to use with two embedde... Autonomous cars, trucks and helicopters, drones and virtual reality technology are at the center of the current whirlwind of technology innovation. But personal light electric vehicles (PLEVs) are also increasingly abundant. They're compact,
They’re the scooters, simple bicycles and mopeds of yesteryear gone electric and grouped under the umbrella term “personal transporters.” And they're used as complementary transportation for travelers or stand-alone vehicles for leisure treks and short commutes.

Electric bikes and other personal mobility transportation systems were prominent at the recent Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Image  © Bruce Aldricch/2018

More than a dozen domestic and international PLEV companies, and at least two with agreements with Ford Motor Company, showcased their new machines at the recent Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas.

Here are three examples of new mobility options, simple to futuristic-looking:

Headquartered in Fremont and manufactured in Ann Arbor, Mich., GenZe electric bikes (www.genze.com) include three ride modes, travel as much as 50 miles per charge and have a removable battery for portable recharging.

The Ujet electric scooter from Luxembourge has advanced technology and folds up into a case similar ro the size of a carry-on suitcased. Image © Bruce Alrdich/2018

Bike lane and public transit friendly, GenZe electric bikes are legal transportation where conventional bicycles are legal. The e-bikes have a maximum speed of 18 miles per hour and include a 345 watt-hour lithium-ion battery. A display shows riders their current speed and battery charge level. Prices range from $1,599 to $1,899 and the bikes weight 46 pounds. GenZe also has a lineup of electric scooters, starting at $2,999.

Available since last June, GenZe recently collaborated with Motivate International, the operator of the Bay Area’s regional bike share system, and Ford’s GoBike program. A fleet of 250 GenZe bikes will be added in April to the current e-bike network in San Francisco.

Riders can locate GenZe e-Bikes using the Ford GoBike application. Renting and returning the e-bikes from any location in San Francisco is available using Clipper smart card or mobile phone.

Ojo Scooters offered a variety of retro-styes scooters. Image © Bruce Aldrich/2018

Marketed as offering clean, sustainable and silent transportation for city dwellers, Ujet (www.ujet.com) debuted its lineup of electric scooters at CES. The futuristic design includes spoke-free wheels, a stealth frame, elaborate technology an weighs 31 pounds all in an easy-to-use foldable system.

Manufactured in Germany and headquartered Luxembourg, the Ujet is high-tech but easily transportable. The scooter includes a built-in HD dash camera, two USB ports as well as Bluetooth and GPS connectivity. The scooter can be paired with a smartphone using a telematics app, with wifi and 4G connectivity.

The Ujet scooter can mount two separate batteries. The smaller battery has a 43-mile range, the larger battery has a 93-mile range. The top speed is 28 miles per hour. Eco, normal and sport driving modes are offered, and the Ujet has a payload of 275 pounds. Costs range from $8,900-$9,900.

Technology makes the Ujet impressively user-friendly. The Android or iOS applications provide instructions for available parking. The app also monitors the scooter’s performance, including battery level, mileage and saved carbon dioxide emissions.

With a range of up to 50 miles,]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 23:59
Episode 22, Famed climber Alex Honnold prefers life in a van https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/01/episode-22-famed-climber-alex-honnold-prefers-life-van/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-22-famed-climber-alex-honnold-prefers-life-van Sat, 13 Jan 2018 22:28:39 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29187 Last summer, Alex Honnold became the first free solo climber to ascend El Capitan in Yosemite. The accomplishment resulted in international acclaim. Honnold appeared on magazine covers, as a guest on late night talk shows, and he continues to be a speaker in demand at trade shows and corporate meetings. Despite his celebrity, Honnold prefers a simple life. He owns and shares a home in Las Vegas with his girlfriend. It’s a short distance from casino mecca and home of the Voetbalwedden headquarters. Another view from his front door highlights a favorite location, the varied, step climbing available at Red Rocks Canyon.   Climber Alex Honnold enjoys life on the road and the simplicity of traveling to train with the conveniences of portability  in his RAM ProMaster cargo van. All images © Bruce Aldrich/2018 But for six months a year, Honnold spends his life on the road in a RAM ProMaster cargo van. It’s equipped with a three-burner stove, and a horizontally positioned mattress across the back of the van. It has all the equipment necessary for the athlete often described as the world’s best mountain climber. The RAM van is Honnold’s third mobile home. He “destroyed” his family’s van during his early nomadic lifestyle. He lived in a Ford Econoline van for years while honing his climbing skills. His current road companion on wheels is parked in the driveway at the end of a street in suburban Las Vegas. Like his climbing proficiency, Honnold is expertly skilled in space management. He describes the middle of the van as a “living room.” The cabinets and draws are packed with essentials. There's a fingerboard across the inside top of the side door. It's where Honnold stretches and strengthens his fingers. The van and its simplicity are just as Honnold likes it. In episode 22 of The Weekly Driver Podcast, hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia visit Alex Honnold at his home in Las Vegas. We revisit his climbing history, his life in Las Vegas and Honnold's favorite lifestyle — life on the road in a van. Last summer, Alex Honnold became the first free solo climber to ascend El Capitan in Yosemite. The accomplishment resulted in international acclaim. Honnold appeared on magazine covers, as a guest on late night talk shows,
Despite his celebrity, Honnold prefers a simple life. He owns and shares a home in Las Vegas with his girlfriend. It’s a short distance from casino mecca and home of the Voetbalwedden headquarters. Another view from his front door highlights a favorite location, the varied, step climbing available at Red Rocks Canyon.

 

Climber Alex Honnold enjoys life on the road and the simplicity of traveling to train with the conveniences of portability  in his RAM ProMaster cargo van. All images © Bruce Aldrich/2018








But for six months a year, Honnold spends his life on the road in a RAM ProMaster cargo van. It’s equipped with a three-burner stove, and a horizontally positioned mattress across the back of the van. It has all the equipment necessary for the athlete often described as the world’s best mountain climber.

The RAM van is Honnold’s third mobile home. He “destroyed” his family’s van during his early nomadic lifestyle. He lived in a Ford Econoline van for years while honing his climbing skills. His current road companion on wheels is parked in the driveway at the end of a street in suburban Las Vegas.

Like his climbing proficiency, Honnold is expertly skilled in space management. He describes the middle of the van as a “living room.” The cabinets and draws are packed with essentials. There's a fingerboard across the inside top of the side door. It's where Honnold stretches and strengthens his fingers. The van and its simplicity are just as Honnold likes it.

In episode 22 of The Weekly Driver Podcast, hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia visit Alex Honnold at his home in Las Vegas. We revisit his climbing history, his life in Las Vegas and Honnold's favorite lifestyle — life on the road in a van.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 24:25
Episode 21, Rags to riches: The restoration of a rare Porsche 356 https://theweeklydriver.com/2018/01/episode-21-rags-riches-restoration-rare-porsche-356/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=episode-21-rags-riches-restoration-rare-porsche-356 Wed, 03 Jan 2018 06:04:11 +0000 https://www.theweeklydriver.com/?p=29165 Leigh Rutledge, a real estate executive in Sacramento, California, owns a rare Porsche — a 1956 Porsche 356 Cabriolet. The car was made in the year Rutledge was born, and the model also corresponds to the month and year she was born. In Episode 21 of The Weekly Driver Podcast, hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Rutledge her 27-year ownership of the unique Porsche. The car has had a hard-to-believe legacy. Leigh Rutledge and her 1956 Porsche 356 Cabriolet. Images © Bruce Aldrich/2018. Rutledge purchased the Porsche in 1990 after noticing it for sale on a 3x5 index card. But the Porsche wasn't much more than a collection of parts. The restoration began as a series of catastrophes, from unscrupulous “experts” to financial missteps. But through the care and concern of several friends as well as her husband, Bill Hambrick (he’s also a vintage Porsche owner), Rutledge persevered. She now has one of what may be 20 known examples of the Cabriolet remaining. Through the years, Rutledge has entered various car shows, and her Porsche has won every time. More than 350 vehicles were entered in one event. Rutledge doesn’t drive her Porsche often, but when she does, it always attracts attention. About 1 1/2 years ago, Rutledge was contacted by a wannabe owner in Germany. The discussion didn’t advance past pleasantries. Rutledge and Hambrick often attend Porsche functions in one of their vintage cars. But they’ve never driven their respective Porsches to the same event. Rutledge said the husband-wife team has discussed the possibilities, and their mini rally could happen this year. Listen to our episode as Rutledge details the trials and tribulations of her Porsche ownership. She talks about rare parts and rave reviews. She shares the appreciation she has for the friend who is largely responsible for its restoration. And she also reveals what her 1956 Porsche 356 Cabriolet is likely worth. Thank you for listening to our podcast. We welcome your comments. Leigh Rutledge, a real estate executive in Sacramento, California, owns a rare Porsche — a 1956 Porsche 356 Cabriolet. - The car was made in the year Rutledge was born, and the model also corresponds to the month and year she was born. -
The car was made in the year Rutledge was born, and the model also corresponds to the month and year she was born.

In Episode 21 of The Weekly Driver Podcast, hosts Bruce Aldrich and James Raia discuss with Rutledge her 27-year ownership of the unique Porsche. The car has had a hard-to-believe legacy.

Leigh Rutledge and her 1956 Porsche 356 Cabriolet. Images © Bruce Aldrich/2018.








Rutledge purchased the Porsche in 1990 after noticing it for sale on a 3x5 index card. But the Porsche wasn't much more than a collection of parts. The restoration began as a series of catastrophes, from unscrupulous “experts” to financial missteps.

But through the care and concern of several friends as well as her husband, Bill Hambrick (he’s also a vintage Porsche owner), Rutledge persevered. She now has one of what may be 20 known examples of the Cabriolet remaining.

Through the years, Rutledge has entered various car shows, and her Porsche has won every time. More than 350 vehicles were entered in one event.

Rutledge doesn’t drive her Porsche often, but when she does, it always attracts attention. About 1 1/2 years ago, Rutledge was contacted by a wannabe owner in Germany. The discussion didn’t advance past pleasantries.

Rutledge and Hambrick often attend Porsche functions in one of their vintage cars. But they’ve never driven their respective Porsches to the same event. Rutledge said the husband-wife team has discussed the possibilities, and their mini rally could happen this year.

Listen to our episode as Rutledge details the trials and tribulations of her Porsche ownership. She talks about rare parts and rave reviews. She shares the appreciation she has for the friend who is largely responsible for its restoration.

And she also reveals what her 1956 Porsche 356 Cabriolet is likely worth.

Thank you for listening to our podcast. We welcome your comments.]]>
James Raia and Bruce Aldrich clean 29:27